Check out these old greats on vid

There is a tennis documentary I would very much like to see. I have seen a couple of extracts of it online, but not the full documentary. It was a Tennis channel documentary (I am from the UK, we don't have Tennis channel here). First broadcast (I think) in 2016. It was called The barnstormers (about the history of pro tennis before the open era). Narrated by Robert Redford. If anyone has access to this and can find a way of sharing this with me, please let me know, as I would very much like to see it.
 
Watch the point at 1 minute 30 second mark. Ashe serves. Nastase hits return drop shot winner. Chair mis-announces score. Says 15-30. Should have been love 40. Nastase wins next point. Should have been game. You'd think Nastase would know. But, no. Blows my mind that no one seems to notice or care. Am I crazy?
 
Watch the point at 1 minute 30 second mark. Ashe serves. Nastase hits return drop shot winner. Chair mis-announces score. Says 15-30. Should have been love 40. Nastase wins next point. Should have been game. You'd think Nastase would know. But, no. Blows my mind that no one seems to notice or care. Am I crazy?
Nastase misses the return, it wasn't a drop shot winner. Looks like it bounced under the net on his side of the net(nets back then were very loose and moved a lot at the bottom , I see that sort of thing a lot in old matches, where it seems like what you describe happened, but it didn't)
Plus you can tell by ashes reaction after serve that the point was dead, it would make no sense for him not to hit that ball, it was moving so slowly and he was right there.
 
Thanks for replying. We'll agree to disagree, however. See if others chime in. (Post edit. My son agrees w/you. Maybe I'm wrong.)
 
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Watch the point at 1 minute 30 second mark. Ashe serves. Nastase hits return drop shot winner. Chair mis-announces score. Says 15-30. Should have been love 40. Nastase wins next point. Should have been game. You'd think Nastase would know. But, no. Blows my mind that no one seems to notice or care. Am I crazy?
I'm with Moose here. Seems the ball rolled onto Ashe's side under the rather loose net. Chair umpire is right over the ball as well. You'd have thought Nastase would have blown up if he thought he'd hit a return winner. It would be even more strange of he hadn't realized he had done so.
 
I was curious if anybody knows if there is any video footage (on YouTube) of tennis from the 1930's, 1940's, and 1950's? (before the open era). I would love to watch the old style of play! I always think of Farley Granger in Strangers On a Train!
 

This is a 1983 match between Mcenroe and Gene Mayer. Look at how far up Mayer is to return Mcenroe's FIRST serve. He's at or a little inside the baseline. Always said it. This guy stood as far in as anyone on Mcenroe's first serve. That was just from memory. First match of theirs I've seen on youtube. But I remember it from 35 years ago.

This was the event with the diamond trophy. You had to win the event 3 out of 5 years to get it.
 
60s pro match Laver vs. Pancho

Interesting footage of these two serve motions.

Notice how both players do not jump on the serve, but step forward smoothly into their approach to net directly from the service motion.

This is how the old serve and volley was done. No jumping, which would have disrupted the motion to net.
 

DMP

Professional
At the 15:18 point and following for a couple of minutes, check out the Hoad/Rosewall doubles team.

You can see one effect of Rosewall's relatively slow service - it allows him to get closer into the net. If you are a good volleyer, as he was, you can gain more by having an accurate,varying, serve which allows you to get closer in. Which is the opposite of the modern serve/return where the speed of both means you are usually stranded too far from the net when the return comes back.
 
You can see one effect of Rosewall's relatively slow service - it allows him to get closer into the net. If you are a good volleyer, as he was, you can gain more by having an accurate,varying, serve which allows you to get closer in. Which is the opposite of the modern serve/return where the speed of both means you are usually stranded too far from the net when the return comes back.
I see your point, and Rosewall did not serve a cannonball.

But he had great serving accuracy and would move the serve around the receiving court, this would reduce the ability of the receiver to "tee off" on Rosewall's serve.

Rosewall's overall serve-and-volley was very effective, and it had to be against his very strong opposition.

However, Gonzales and Hoad served the cannonball, among other types of serve, and also were very tough on defending their service games.
 
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