Clash

Chezbeeno

Professional
#15
In that pic the paint job looks horrible, but in others I've seen it looks decent, I guess we'll just have to wait and see how it looks in person? I'm really interested to hit with this thing at some point, since I've never hit with a flexible racquet that felt stable enough for my liking.
 

AMGF

Professional
#18
Damn I might buy one just to support Wilson for making a low RA frame. It could replace my MG Radical MP as my coaching frame.
 

dak95_00

Hall of Fame
#19
It has nothing to do with a blade at all. Its a totally different frame!!
I played with the 98 tour version. Its fantastic!
Measured RA 55 strung



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Right. Let’s look at the specs and reread what when I said, “...it’s a smaller version of the BLX Blade Team....”

NOTICE THE RA of 53!!!




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#20
Right. Let’s look at the specs and reread what when I said, “...it’s a smaller version of the BLX Blade Team....”

NOTICE THE RA of 53!!!




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Pfff reread it yourself dude.. It plays so different then the blade team. You cant compare them. Its a way better racket!


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dak95_00

Hall of Fame
#22
Pfff reread it yourself dude.. It plays so different then the blade team. You cant compare them. Its a way better racket!


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Riiiiight. Serena and Venus sure looked terrible when they played that garbage. But the Clash... The Clash will rock the cas, uh hum, ATP TOUR!

Which men have made the switch already? It must be ..... the racquet!
 

dak95_00

Hall of Fame
#24
I hope it's a success and more manufacturers start making low RA frames that feel good and nice on your arm.
Based upon experience, it seems that tennis elbow and shoulder pains are caused more by switching of equipment such as racquets and strings. TE has been around forever including the wood racquet era.

My friends who suffer seem to be the same guys who switch racquets from stiff to flexible or vice versa. The same is true of strings. I could definitely be wrong but it seems to me that one’s technique is learned to adapt to their chosen technology. I play a super heavy 13.5 oz racquet that is at least 20 points headlight and very flexible. I have very flat swings. I have extreme difficulty using lightweight stiff frames. It’s just not my cup of tea to swing that easy or to swing with a ton of spin to try to offset my power.

The only time I ever had elbow pain was when I switched to using the Head Microgel Radical OS. It had to be due to it being so lightweight. It was strung with synthetic gut too.

In summary, low flex is the most oversold thing recently. It’s nothing but a diet fad.
 
#27
Based upon experience, it seems that tennis elbow and shoulder pains are caused more by switching of equipment such as racquets and strings. TE has been around forever including the wood racquet era.

My friends who suffer seem to be the same guys who switch racquets from stiff to flexible or vice versa. The same is true of strings. I could definitely be wrong but it seems to me that one’s technique is learned to adapt to their chosen technology. I play a super heavy 13.5 oz racquet that is at least 20 points headlight and very flexible. I have very flat swings. I have extreme difficulty using lightweight stiff frames. It’s just not my cup of tea to swing that easy or to swing with a ton of spin to try to offset my power.

The only time I ever had elbow pain was when I switched to using the Head Microgel Radical OS. It had to be due to it being so lightweight. It was strung with synthetic gut too.

In summary, low flex is the most oversold thing recently. It’s nothing but a diet fad.
I think that stiffness is one part of the equation along with mass, balance, grip size, string type and technology. Saying that using a stiff racquet with harsh technology is bad.
One of the reasons why the old flexible racquets caused arm problems because many were harsh as well, in the 70's the old aluminium frames were flexible but would vibrate like tuning forks. Many would frames were like that as well. Many of today's flexible racquets are also very smooth and buttery and you could argue that some stiffer ones are as well. Pro Kennex kinetic technology does a great job of protecting the arm.
 
#28
Riiiiight. Serena and Venus sure looked terrible when they played that garbage. But the Clash... The Clash will rock the cas, uh hum, ATP TOUR!

Which men have made the switch already? It must be ..... the racquet!
Yes it plays great! But if its better then the best pro stock? No my PT57A's plays better. Just like most pro stock frames they're customized to the person. But who knows, there come a pro stock clash? More can switch. It plays very easy and feels very solid.


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Zoolander

Hall of Fame
#29
Yes it plays great! But if its better then the best pro stock? No my PT57A's plays better. Just like most pro stock frames they're customized to the person. But who knows, there come a pro stock clash? More can switch. It plays very easy and feels very solid.


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Was the 98 different from the 100? As in string pattern spacing etc? Any actual photos of it?

Interested too if the clash power level felt lower because of the flex? If Wilson can make a lighter weight flexy racquet that still feels solid and quite powerful i will be impressed.
 

MRfStop

Professional
#31
Why is Wilson trying to sell the “flexible” frame as new technology? Oh that’s right because the people who don’t know get sucked into “new” technology when Wilson has been giving pro level players low RA rated racquets for years
 
#33
Was the 98 different from the 100? As in string pattern spacing etc? Any actual photos of it?

Interested too if the clash power level felt lower because of the flex? If Wilson can make a lighter weight flexy racquet that still feels solid and quite powerful i will be impressed.
Its not much different, just smaller headsize, but had more control and feel.
You wil be impressed. But keep the stringtensio n low. Plays way better.



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#36
I saw the Clash and Clash Tour 100 in my local pro shop. It looks way better in person than the pictures show.
I never saw this frame personally, but on photos seems that it has a thicker beam(I hate this cosmetics...) like Burn or Ultra.
So,my simples question is:
-How can a thicker beam be translated in low RA?!?!Wich materials are used?
Curious...


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#39
I never saw this frame personally, but on photos seems that it has a thicker beam(I hate this cosmetics...) like Burn or Ultra.
So,my simples question is:
-How can a thicker beam be translated in low RA?!?!Wich materials are used?
Curious...


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So the low RA/High stability is because of how they lay out the graphite in the braiding process... Of course I have forgotten the explanation the rep gave on this! :laughing:
 
#44
I was wondering why on some photos, the clash has glossy black paint and on other pics it has matte black paint.

Does somebody know why?
Yes, the pro players get the glossy paint. Retail is matte. Glossy looks better on tv!
My glossy Clash 98 tour is a demo from a pro player.


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#49
am currently trying out a few rackets (vcore 98, pure aero, dr100 and pure strike 98 original) is this worth waiting for before making a decision? sound like it could be the best thing in a long time but is it all hype?
 
#50
So,my simples question is:
-How can a thicker beam be translated in low RA?!?!Wich materials are used?
Curious...
The frame is constructed in such a way that it flexes at certain points and remains stiffer at other points. Apparently the frame responds in different ways depending on the amount of force applied to the frame when it impacts with the tennis ball.

What I'm curious about is whether the frame will crack in the same place when it is abused. If it does, that will provide more information regarding the racquet's layup.
 
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