Classic Racquets vs NextGen Forehand

Smecz

Semi-Pro
Can classic rackets have a chance to survive if most players start playing NextGen Forehand?!

Most players who use this forehand do not play classic rackets.

Typical classic rackets are not easy to play with the NextGen forehand, as most of these rackets are balanced on the handle, not the head.

So far, half of the players use modern forehand and the other half use nextgen.

So do you think typical classic rackets like Dunlop CX 200, Head Prestige Tour 2021, or Babolat pure strike VS would survive if most players started playing NextGen Forehand?
 

Grafil Injection

Hall of Fame
Murray's PT57 is quite head-heavy, but I know what you mean. I always think the current Dunlop 200 and Prestiges are designed for adding weight to the hoop, so I'd be surprised if any Pros use those stock. And starting HL, means you can tailor them a bit easier.
 

tele

Professional
i certainly hope they stick around, but if they do not, i think head size and stiffness would play a bigger role than balance. dimitrov (safin too?) is another modern forehander with a pretty head heavy racquet. on the otherhand, kyrgios purportedly has a 32cm balance and seems to hit a next gen style forehand just fine
 

Smecz

Semi-Pro
Yes,You have a right,
since fewer players play at the net, and even if they play at the net, a modern racket will also decently finish the ball with a volley or smash.

It looks as if the classic frame makes it more and more difficult to play a forehand whip.

In the Daniil vs Carlos Indian wells match, I saw speed balls, the players is not focused on precise and controlled ball play, they are more interested in inflicting quick and strong blows, and taking time.

When the balls were slower, skillful placement of the ball in the court made sense, moreover, often players like Hewitt or Coria were famous for it.

Further, classic racquets such as Wilson pro staff 85 or Prince Phantom 93 do not allow you to play nextgen forehand, because the balance on the handle and the weight make it more air resistance and such rackets get stuck with such a swing!.
 
L

lazyfootwork

Guest
I think a blend of old school and new school can survive, see Rublev: low flex, very headlight, dense pattern, but more modern headsize. Hits with some of the highest racquet head speed on tour!
 

Smecz

Semi-Pro
I think a blend of old school and new school can survive, see Rublev: low flex, very headlight, dense pattern, but more modern headsize. Hits with some of the highest racquet head speed on tour!
Of course, it's true, I'm mainly into classic racquets, it's hard to play forehand Nextgen.

There are simply less classic racquets,because it's hard to make such a swing with such racquets

I have not yet seen a player who would play Nextgen forehand, e.g. Wilson Pro Staff 97 or Prince Phantom 93.

This is possible, but very ineffective, and there are no results from it.
 

vsbabolat

G.O.A.T.
Murray's PT57 is quite head-heavy, but I know what you mean. I always think the current Dunlop 200 and Prestiges are designed for adding weight to the hoop, so I'd be surprised if any Pros use those stock. And starting HL, means you can tailor them a bit easier.
I have my HEAD racquets with a head light balance.
 

Smecz

Semi-Pro
I have my HEAD racquets with a head light balance.
Most HEAD racquets will be played NextGen Forehand.
Generally now racquets have a head light balance, the era serve and volley is over.

My point is that only modern forehand is suitable for classic racquets!
 

vsbabolat

G.O.A.T.
Most HEAD racquets will be played NextGen Forehand.
Generally now racquets have a head light balance, the era serve and volley is over.

My point is that only modern forehand is suitable for classic racquets!
My 1980’s HEAD racquets all have a headlight balance. Mine are 31-31.5cm UNSTRUNG. Oh in the 80’s I served and volleyed with them and when I play doubles to this day I serve and volley on both first and second serve.
 
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vsbabolat

G.O.A.T.
I wish I could have got my Graphite Pro or Zebra MP to my usual 7-8pts HL, but that would take their total weights to about 380g+. I guess I got unlucky with slightly over-spec versions. :confused:
What’s the spec of your Graphite Pro. Early ones with AMF on them came in Light and medium
 

Grafil Injection

Hall of Fame
What’s the spec of your Graphite Pro. Early ones with AMF on them came in Light and medium
Mine's a MIA: 366g, 33cm balance. No OG or anything else. About 8g too much in the head I guess. Labeled L4. I think Austria still had military service in those days, so 350sw was easy!
 
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NicoMK

Hall of Fame
My 1980’s HEAD racquets all have a headlight balance. Mine are 31-31.5cm UNSTRUNG. Oh in the 80’s I served and volleyed with them and when I play doubles to this day I serve and volley on both first and second serve.
Mine - not Head - are all 30,5cm unstrung. Does this thread imply that you cannot play a "modern game" with classic rackets?

I cannot put a ball in court with their goddam tweeners; however I don't feel like I'm playing like an old dude... yet... :laughing:
 
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Smecz

Semi-Pro
My 1980’s HEAD racquets all have a headlight balance. Mine are 31-31.5cm UNSTRUNG. Oh in the 80’s I served and volleyed with them and when I play doubles to this day I serve and volley on both first and second serve.
Ever racquet you will voley,
It all depends on what you're going to use the racquet for.

However, a racquet that is balanced on the handle is more suitable for serve and volley.

Also a balanced racquet will be more suitable for nextgen forehand game,
the head is supposed to turn, the balance on the handle immediately blocks the speed of the head.

Swinging such a racquet hard, probably today most nextgen players, has a head balance!.
 

vsbabolat

G.O.A.T.
Ever racquet you will voley,
It all depends on what you're going to use the racquet for.

However, a racquet that is balanced on the handle is more suitable for serve and volley.

Also a balanced racquet will be more suitable for nextgen forehand game,
the head is supposed to turn, the balance on the handle immediately blocks the speed of the head.

Swinging such a racquet hard, probably today most nextgen players, has a head balance!.
A head light balance does not block the speed of the head of the racket.
 

Smecz

Semi-Pro
Mine - not Head - are all 30,5cm unstrung. Does this thread imply that you cannot play a "modern game" with classic rackets?

I cannot put a ball in court with their goddam tweeners; however I don't feel like I'm playing like an old dude... yet... :laughing:
The point is that tennis players like Jack Sock,Nick Kyrgios,Jack Draper with their forehand nextgen,they won't get much benefit from classic racquets.

How many more classic racquets will be on the market 10 years? 15 years maximum?

Modern racquet can play modern forehand and nextgen forehand,and classic racquet can play modern racquet, but play nextgen forehand will be big challenge.
 
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