Cleaning frames before stringing

afeller

New User
I coincidentally came across a Babolat video where they was cleaning the rackets before the stringing:
Babolab - Step 2: Cleaning Zone

If you jump to about 32 seconds they use a spray to clean up the frame/grommets. Does anyone know which spray the use?
Maybe a normal cockpitspray?

And how (with what) do you clean the frames?

I'm using a brush (with a little bit water) to remove the clay and sometimes Isopropanol to remove some dots frome the logo marker, but nothing more.
 

sovertennis

Professional
A guy I knew who strung a lot of rackets at a club used furniture polish. He said when he handed the racket back to the customer they usually said "Wow, look like new!"

Plus, it had a clean, lemony scent.
 

Chotobaka

Hall of Fame
I have been using Acrylsol in a spray can for a few years now. This is used in auto body/paint shops for cleaning and degreasing. Zero residue and safe for finished paint. My favorite surfactant product.
 

esgee48

Legend
I use both alcohol and mineral spirits. Removes all traces of grease and also disinfects. :twisted:

It also helps to find potential cracks in the frame (different from visual inspection) as you run the cloth over the frame. You can feel the difference sometimes and this can cause you to more closely inspect the frame in that area to see what cause the different feel. 2 cents.
 

jim e

Legend
Be careful with oily products like furniture polish, as customers may not like oily finish to get on hands (many have lemon oil) . I found best thing to do is string racquet, as that is the job requested, and let customer clean their racquet themselves if they want it clean.Some players keep their equipment maintained nice, and others just let it go.I have smelled some bad grips in past, and believe me you would not want to remove the smelly thing, so I do not volunteer to take care of gross items as well.
Then again its your business to offer what you want.
Whatever you do decide, be sure to inspect each racquet closely for any fractures, especially before you remove strings, and also check grommets out before you remove strings as well as after you remove strings, as worn/cracked grommets can effect your string job.
Some players really abuse their racquets, as I remember hitting with one person who after he threw racquet he kicked it into the fence.I really doubt that he cares how clean it is.I have no issues telling someone like that I refuse to string it if cracked, as I am not going to spend time and string price on a cracked frame that can collapse.
 
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I will take a damp cloth and wipe the frame down if it is really dirty/dusty. If any sticky residue, I use alcohol swabs. If really bad, lighter fluid. It is good every once and a while to wipe the racquet down.
 

Chotobaka

Hall of Fame
Be careful with oily products like furniture polish, as customers may not like oily finish to get on hands (many have lemon oil) . I found best thing to do is string racquet, as that is the job requested, and let customer clean their racquet themselves if they want it clean.Some players keep their equipment maintained nice, and others just let it go.I have smelled some bad grips in past, and believe me you would not want to remove the smelly thing, so I do not volunteer to take care of gross items as well.
Then again its your business to offer what you want.
Whatever you do decide, be sure to inspect each racquet closely for any fractures, especially before you remove strings, and also check grommets out before you remove strings as well as after you remove strings, as worn/cracked grommets can effect your string job.
Some players really abuse their racquets, as I remember hitting with one person who after he threw racquet he kicked it into the fence.I really doubt that he cares how clean it is.I have no issues telling someone like that I refuse to string it if cracked, as I am not going to spend time and string price on a cracked frame that can collapse.
It is also a certified dirt/dust magnet.
 
Be careful with oily products like furniture polish, as customers may not like oily finish to get on hands (many have lemon oil) . I found best thing to do is string racquet, as that is the job requested, and let customer clean their racquet themselves if they want it clean.Some players keep their equipment maintained nice, and others just let it go.I have smelled some bad grips in past, and believe me you would not want to remove the smelly thing, so I do not volunteer to take care of gross items as well.
Then again its your business to offer what you want.
Whatever you do decide, be sure to inspect each racquet closely for any fractures, especially before you remove strings, and also check grommets out before you remove strings as well as after you remove strings, as worn/cracked grommets can effect your string job.
Some players really abuse their racquets, as I remember hitting with one person who after he threw racquet he kicked it into the fence.I really doubt that he cares how clean it is.I have no issues telling someone like that I refuse to string it if cracked, as I am not going to spend time and string price on a cracked frame that can collapse.
You are exactly right. ALways ask the customer when doing anything else besides stringing ( cleaning racquet, changing grips, etc). I know never to mess with someone's grip unless I check with them or they request it.
 

esgee48

Legend
I hardly ever get frames that have been abused. If they are, I normally turn the customer down. Most of the frames I get are a little dirty and dusty, which is why I clean them. If the customer asks for a new grip, they'll get one. New grommets too if they arrange in advance to have one.
 
I probably take this to the extreme, but it's how I treat my own racquet and how I treat anyone's racquet that I string.

I'll first wash off the racquet using a soft sponge w/scrub pad, using a mild car soap & water mixture. After I've cleaned the racquet to my acceptance and have wiped it dry I'll next wipe down the racquet using a soft towel spayed with Meguiars Shine Protectant (used to use ArmorAll). Then once I've strung the racquet and placed an overgrip on it will again wipe it down with the protectant.

Have had customers state that picking up a restrung racquet from me is like picking up a new racquet. I've yet to hear anyone complaining.....more often then not they leave amazed at the transformation between what they dropped off and what they picked up.

It's amayzing how a few minutes of up-front cleaning and a little elbow power can bring out the shine on some otherwise dull old racquets.
 
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