Coaching and emotions on court

TeamOB

Professional
A trend I see almost universally in high-performance academies and junior development programs is coaches discouraging all shows of emotion on court. The standard coaching mantra seems to have become: "Turn your back to the opponent, fiddle with your strings, go through your rituals etc.". It seems like coaches are trying to turn their students into a bunch of emotionless Sharapova-clones. Students that show some emotion (talking to themselves, swearing under their breath, tossing their racquet etc.) are criticized, labeled as having a "crappy attitude", and sometimes punished with laps, pushups or other physical activity. The problem I see with this is that the poker-face ice-man attitude does not work for everyone. In fact, I think that it only works for a small minority of especially stoic people. For the average Joe it is counterproductive to keep their anger or frustration pent-up like this. I see many kids (I am one of them) that play much better after releasing some of their accumulated anger. I think that as long as they are not totally out of control, coaches should encourage their students to do whatever they need to keep their emotional balance. As long as their behavior is not a code-able offense in tournaments (ex. yelling obscenities, breaking racquets, hitting balls over the fence etc.) coaches should allow or even encourage it. What do you think about this issue?
 

newpball

Legend
I do not see the issue, you ought to behave on court, just like you ought to behave everywhere else! It is as simple as that! And I am sure that if you have good parents they tell you that as well, and so should a good coach.

If you have trouble with anger go to anger management classes or learn to meditate.
 

Ash_Smith

Legend
TeamOB

Emotional behaviour on court needs to be controlled/redirected/reframed if the athlete/coach feel that it is having a detrimental effect on performance. If it is not having a detrimental effect and is within the boundaries of fair play and the rules of the game then I have no issue with players showing emotion providing that they can can then reset and arrive emotionally ready to play the next point.

The 'sharapova-ing" is probably how most coaches are teaching their players to reset after points, which is fine, but like most things in sport, it should be unique to the individual athlete and not a one size fits all.
 

TeamOB

Professional
The 'sharapova-ing" is probably how most coaches are teaching their players to reset after points, which is fine, but like most things in sport, it should be unique to the individual athlete and not a one size fits all.
This is the main issue I was pointing out. Many coaches seem to be using this as a one-size-fits-all approach. They set Federer as a model for on-court personality and train their students to conform to it.
 

Ash_Smith

Legend
This is the main issue I was pointing out. Many coaches seem to be using this as a one-size-fits-all approach. They set Federer as a model for on-court personality and train their students to conform to it.
The thing they don't know understand about Rog is that as a junior he went through a real spell of "bratty" behaviour on court.

My favourite Rog story is how after losing to Tim in the 1/4's in Paris around 2003 he was incredibly calm and dignified in his post match interview and then preceded to utterly destroy the locker room in a rage fit! He may look calm, but that's only because he has learned how best to control and reframe his emotions.
 

LeeD

Bionic Poster
I think it's in direct response to TV WTA tennis, and sometimes, ATP tennis.
They players pump their fists after every point they didn't lose. They're yelling "C'mon" !!!, over and over again.
So, coach's respond by hoping to try something opposite.
Twas watching first round of the BerkeleyCityJunior T yesterday.
Overall, excellent behavior, quick unobtrusive fist pumps, and lots of "nice shot"'s after opponent's great shots.
 
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