Continental grip forehand pros and cons

HuusHould

Professional
I have been experimenting with an aggressive continental grip forehand when I get caught with the grip, especially on the return of serve. I hit a hybrid, where my follow through is the modern day windscreen wiper. I find this grip allows me to rebound the pace of the fast 1st serve more easily and it allows me to attack off both wings, even if I'm expecting the ball to come to the other wing. (Im using more or less the same grip from both wings) If the ball comes to my bh, I hit a Dominic Thiem drive, where my left hand stays on the throat until the racquet gets to my left hip in the forward swing.
I would say half volleys are easier with the conti grip because you're contacting the ball down so low. I also find high balls aren't as difficult with the grip as you might expect (both flattening out and hitting topspin). I think the windscreen wipe helps a lot with topspin on the high ball. Does anyone know anyone with a really good cont fh? Why is the grip extinct at the top level? Any technical recommendations for hitting the shot effectively? I was going to post this in the "multiple grips" thread, but thought I might get more responses here!
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
Great for blocking or hitting drop shots, squash shots and other Fh slice shots. Can also hit flat or mild / moderate TS with the Conti grip.

Conti grip is typically best for low or medium-high contact points. I could hit a vicious slice on a high ball but could not really hit TS on those high balls with a conti.

BTW, Conti great can also be useful for hitting the tweener, the Bucharest backfire, a behind-the-back shot, etc
 

ZanderGoga

Semi-Pro
The way you describe your shot, with a continental FH grip and modern, "windshield wiper" style follow through, is biomechanically incongruous.

That follow through is the result of the relaxed extension that comes from a lag-and-snap, rotational forehand, with relaxed arm coming through its hitting slot and rotating freely in the shoulder socket. It happens because of an open stance, and open upper body. That motion, coupled with a continental grip, opens the racquet face too much at any possible point in the contact zone to be functional as a high level forehand. To level the face, you will have to muscle it into position, which will both slow your forehand, and put undue stress on the connective tissues of the arm. Such a forehand is guaranteed to be unhealthy, both in terms of results and effects to the body.

The conti demands a neutral stance, and a hitting chain that begins with the hips opening via a forward stride. Such a motion allows you to make contact earlier in the torso's rotation, so the body isn't as open at contact as with a modern forehand. At THIS point in the swing, the arm can swing freely and the shoulder's natural rotation will have the racquet face level at contact. The contact point will still be further back than with an eastern forehand using similar stride mechanics, but the natural follow through will be to allow the racquet to roll such that the racquet fact comes horizontally across the body. Watch McEnroe on the senior tours, where he routinely hits conti against modern topspin strokes. His athleticism has always been a little herky jerky, relying on angelic eye-hand coordination rather than overt athletic skill, but the motion itself is pretty textbook. Gets neutral on the stance in a hurry, straight-back linear takeback, stride into the court (opening the hips), contact point between the front hip in the side fence, follow through that rolls horizontally across the body.


The grip is extinct at the top level because it doesn't offer nearly the spin potential or reliability for sustained, heavy strokes from the baseline all day against incoming balls spinning at thousands of RPM's, and coming in above the waist. The conti's virtue is its versatility, and versatility isn't that important at top levels any longer. It's still perfectly viable virtually anywhere below that level, however. And of course, it's always remained a fine way to strike a backhand.
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
Yeah, I can't really visualize hitting a WW Fh with a Conti grip either. Got any video footage of this unique hybrid stroke?
 

HuusHould

Professional
Yeah, I can't really visualize hitting a WW Fh with a Conti grip either. Got any video footage of this unique hybrid stroke?
I've only just started hitting it, so no footage as yet. I got the idea off a coach that I used to work for. He passed away this year, he told me that was what he did. (and watching him it looked like the conti ww combo) He got to the 600 bracket in singles in the world, back in the 80s I think it was. I have posted a video of my serve on here a while ago, I'm not very tech savvy haha, so have forgotten how to do it, but will try to post something here eventually.
 

Dragy

Legend
WW is actually final visual of how racquet head moves, and a bit misleading term, as racquet head on good stroke doesn’t wipe imaginary “surface”, but continues through that surface, while simultaneously rotating up and inward into finish... Bit it’s a common term, so let’s keep it.

More interesting is why and how to use that motion instead of/in addition to all-arm/racquet upward swing. Where the answer is - it’s powered by arm rotation (ISR) which is faster than arm swinging... Now what is the impact of such arm rotation around long axis is strongly dependent on the grip. And while with E to W FH grip it gives you different combo of “slap” + “WW brush”, with conti it’s almost pure “slap” think serving for understanding. Hence using ISR with conti grip will help close RF, but not brush the ball.

Meanwhile, trying to simulate WW brush with conti grip by wrist upward motion seems non-effective and injury-prone - as such a motion relies on small weak forearm muscles. Another alternative is using biceps - bending the elbow to produce WW brush... but such motion would likely affect the plow-through part.
 

NLBwell

Legend
As a continental grip player it is certainly possible to hit extreme topspin with a continental grip. To visualize a windshield wiper motion with a continental grip hold the racket in front of your shoulder with the racket head up vertically. Now you throw it forward like an ax. You can even get the windshield wiper motion by just moving your pinky finger back and forth and rotating the racket in that plane if the racket is tilted toward you a bit.
If you have a western grip, your wrist would be to the side of the racket and it would be very awkward to throw the racket like an ax. However, if you put the racket past the left shoulder you can rotate the wrist in a windshield motion very easily. This is close to what is taught as the windshield wiper forehand.
Adjusting contact position, wrist position, and even using the hand and fingers can give a continental grip forehand a windshield wiper motion. You just have to get used to the grip and build your muscles up to do it (usually from the time you were a child, not weightlifting, since you need a lot of flexibility for particular motions to be built up also).
Hitting extreme topspin is not a natural motion with a continental grip the way it is with a western grip, but an add-on to the stroke for the forehand (on the backhand it is the same motion as any other good one-handed backhand) and I use it as a change of pace. The natural shot is flat. Certainly all the great pros who used continental grips could hit big topspin on the forehand even if they didn't regularly do it.

The reasons the conti grip isn't used anymore are many. Biggest reason is the court surface. Continental grips are excellent for hitting balls that are low and medium height. High-bouncing courts favor western grips (back to the days of "Little Bill" Johnston). Western grips are called western because they were used on the high-bouncing cement courts of California. Eastern grips were used in the eastern U.S. where there were more grass courts and clay, while continental grips were used on "the Continent" - Europe where the courts were often grass and clay.

Also, with the slower court surfaces and balls (and now poly strings) there is not as much of a payoff for hitting aggressive flat shots and net play (things conti grips are very good at). The percentage play is to loop the ball high over the net, even though the topspin shots give your opponent much more time to react and get the ball back to you - thus many long rallies.
 

HuusHould

Professional
The reasons the conti grip isn't used anymore are many. Biggest reason is the court surface. Continental grips are excellent for hitting balls that are low and medium height. High-bouncing courts favor western grips (back to the days of "Little Bill" Johnston). Western grips are called western because they were used on the high-bouncing cement courts of California. Eastern grips were used in the eastern U.S. where there were more grass courts and clay, while continental grips were used on "the Continent" - Europe where the courts were often grass and clay.

Also, with the slower court surfaces and balls (and now poly strings) there is not as much of a payoff for hitting aggressive flat shots and net play (things conti grips are very good at). The percentage play is to loop the ball high over the net, even though the topspin shots give your opponent much more time to react and get the ball back to you - thus many long rallies.
I think you make some good points about the surfaces and the fact that more topspin on your shots than the stock continental grip fh offers seems to be the higher percentage play, certainly as far as making the shot goes. I just think that if someone can find a way to consistently hit flat penetrating groundstrokes, almost regardless of what types of balls they're receiving, then they'll be very hard to beat. I think the only way to beat Rafa at the French might be to flatten out your groundies at the first opportunity and then do it for three or four subsequent shots until you ideally win the point.
 

NLBwell

Legend
I think you make some good points about the surfaces and the fact that more topspin on your shots than the stock continental grip fh offers seems to be the higher percentage play, certainly as far as making the shot goes. I just think that if someone can find a way to consistently hit flat penetrating groundstrokes, almost regardless of what types of balls they're receiving, then they'll be very hard to beat. I think the only way to beat Rafa at the French might be to flatten out your groundies at the first opportunity and then do it for three or four subsequent shots until you ideally win the point.
Yes, this worked for Jimmy Connors for many years.. He defeated all the topspinners of his day. However, there are few (if none) who are as talented as Connors. It is not the percentage play and most players will fail most of the time. Top players are now learning to be significantly more aggressive and hit flatter (even Nadal at times) and it's starting to make tennis more interesting to watch than it was a few years ago but the go to play is still the topspin groundstroke with lots of margin despite a DelPotro dominating with flat strokes at times.
These things do ebb and flow as players learn counters to whatever strategy is dominant, so I expect to see more aggression and flatter strokes in the future even if the game will not return to what it used to be.
 

HuusHould

Professional
These things do ebb and flow as players learn counters to whatever strategy is dominant, so I expect to see more aggression and flatter strokes in the future even if the game will not return to what it used to be.
Yeah, I know an ex pro who said the pros are starting to hit flatter more often. I think someone will come along with devastating flat groundies and change the way the game is played.
 
The way you describe your shot, with a continental FH grip and modern, "windshield wiper" style follow through, is biomechanically incongruous.

That follow through is the result of the relaxed extension that comes from a lag-and-snap, rotational forehand, with relaxed arm coming through its hitting slot and rotating freely in the shoulder socket. It happens because of an open stance, and open upper body. That motion, coupled with a continental grip, opens the racquet face too much at any possible point in the contact zone to be functional as a high level forehand. To level the face, you will have to muscle it into position, which will both slow your forehand, and put undue stress on the connective tissues of the arm. Such a forehand is guaranteed to be unhealthy, both in terms of results and effects to the body.

The conti demands a neutral stance, and a hitting chain that begins with the hips opening via a forward stride. Such a motion allows you to make contact earlier in the torso's rotation, so the body isn't as open at contact as with a modern forehand. At THIS point in the swing, the arm can swing freely and the shoulder's natural rotation will have the racquet face level at contact. The contact point will still be further back than with an eastern forehand using similar stride mechanics, but the natural follow through will be to allow the racquet to roll such that the racquet fact comes horizontally across the body. Watch McEnroe on the senior tours, where he routinely hits conti against modern topspin strokes. His athleticism has always been a little herky jerky, relying on angelic eye-hand coordination rather than overt athletic skill, but the motion itself is pretty textbook. Gets neutral on the stance in a hurry, straight-back linear takeback, stride into the court (opening the hips), contact point between the front hip in the side fence, follow through that rolls horizontally across the body.


The grip is extinct at the top level because it doesn't offer nearly the spin potential or reliability for sustained, heavy strokes from the baseline all day against incoming balls spinning at thousands of RPM's, and coming in above the waist. The conti's virtue is its versatility, and versatility isn't that important at top levels any longer. It's still perfectly viable virtually anywhere below that level, however. And of course, it's always remained a fine way to strike a backhand.
Just gotta say that is a BEAUTIFUL unit turn from Johnny Mac. And watching him come to net... glorious, 99% of the tour could still learn something from his transition and net game.

Agreed about conti not having a place in the pro game today. You could be successful with it as a rec player up to the ~5.0 level, but you’d need to move well enough to take heavy spin shots as half volleys. If you want to hit with heavy topspin you need to be a contortionist.
 

HuusHould

Professional
You can even get the windshield wiper motion by just moving your pinky finger back and forth and rotating the racket in that plane if the racket is tilted toward you a bit.
I've noticed when I'm trying to hit heavy topspin with the conti grip that, manipulating the butt of the racquet in my palm using my fingers can assist greatly with generating topspin. I was doing this without realising it.
 

GuyClinch

Legend
Just gotta say that is a BEAUTIFUL unit turn from Johnny Mac. And watching him come to net... glorious, 99% of the tour could still learn something from his transition and net game.

Agreed about conti not having a place in the pro game today. You could be successful with it as a rec player up to the ~5.0 level, but you’d need to move well enough to take heavy spin shots as half volleys. If you want to hit with heavy topspin you need to be a contortionist.
Well you can hit a slice forehand from time to time in the pros. So it has a place. But why suffer with topspin shots? Johnny Mac hits a pretty good topspin forehand with it. But if he wanted that to be his bread and butter he would switch to a SW grip. He just hits a few balls back until he can get into the net..
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
Just gotta say that is a BEAUTIFUL unit turn from Johnny Mac. And watching him come to net... glorious, 99% of the tour could still learn something from his transition and net game.

Agreed about conti not having a place in the pro game today. You could be successful with it as a rec player up to the ~5.0 level, but you’d need to move well enough to take heavy spin shots as half volleys. If you want to hit with heavy topspin you need to be a contortionist.
What I'm impressed with is how every shot off McEnroe's racket comes off at the same trajectory. BH, FH, Slice... doesn't matter. Exact same trajectory. I wish i could keep my contact and racket face that consistent.
 

mcs1970

Hall of Fame
McEnroe used a modified conti. Closer to an Eastern grip. Else it is very difficult to get topspin off a full conti.
 

NLBwell

Legend
Well you can hit a slice forehand from time to time in the pros. So it has a place. But why suffer with topspin shots? Johnny Mac hits a pretty good topspin forehand with it. But if he wanted that to be his bread and butter he would switch to a SW grip. He just hits a few balls back until he can get into the net..
It depends on what your game is, of course.
Even with a semi-western grip he never would have out-rallied Borg, Wilander, Vilas, Lendl and the like. He wasn't suffering from not having a semi-western or western grip.
 

mcs1970

Hall of Fame
No, it is not difficult if you practice it.
I play with a modified conti all the time and have dabbled in pure conti as well. Not saying I am anywhere close to a high level player but most videos of players supposedly hitting topspin with conti are like the JMac one where they are using a modified conti.
 

zaph

Professional
It depends what your goal is. I have my doubts about such a grip being a good idea if you have hopes of reaching a high level but if you're an amateur hack like the most of us here, it should work. The disadvantage is you will struggle to generate as much topspin as W/SW players. You all might struggle to handle their topspin.

Though, if we are being honest, how many rec players actually generate massive topspin with their forehand?

The advantages I can see is you can pretty much play every shot with the same grip, which simplifies things.
 

HuusHould

Professional
It depends on what your game is, of course.
Even with a semi-western grip he never would have out-rallied Borg, Wilander, Vilas, Lendl and the like. He wasn't suffering from not having a semi-western or western grip.
It's a bit of a chicken or the egg scenario isn't it. Do you use the grip that suits your game or does your game evolve as a natural consequence of your grip. It has to be the former otherwise you wouldn't know what grip to select in the first place. Although sometimes a players grip when they start playing might be selected by chance or by a coach that has a bias towards a certain grip I don't think that's ideal. I'm sure some of the pros use slightly different grips on their fh (drives, slice fhs aside) depending on the situation and what they're trying to do with the ball. I've seen Wawrinka clearly use a more traditional grip when dealing with drop shots.
 

HuusHould

Professional
And while with E to W FH grip it gives you different combo of “slap” + “WW brush”, with conti it’s almost pure “slap” think serving for understanding. Hence using ISR with conti grip will help close RF, but not brush the ball.
Yeah the shot has a bit of a slappy feel to it. The timing has to be perfect and the more out of the optimal pace/height that the incoming ball is with reference to the conti grip, the more catastrophic slight errors in timing are haha

Meanwhile, trying to simulate WW brush with conti grip by wrist upward motion seems non-effective and injury-prone - as such a motion relies on small weak forearm muscles. Another alternative is using biceps - bending the elbow to produce WW brush... but such motion would likely affect the plow-through part.
How would you describe what Bernard Tomic does? I remember he beat the Djoker in Hopman Cup 6/4 6/4. I think they showed the golf style tracers or Hawkeye of some of his fhs and he's essentially fading or drawing the shot with a bitchslap that either places his hand slightly leading his wrist or slightly laid back at the wrist at contact. His grip is only as far round as Eastern at best.
 

Dragy

Legend
How would you describe what Bernard Tomic does? I remember he beat the Djoker in Hopman Cup 6/4 6/4. I think they showed the golf style tracers or Hawkeye of some of his fhs and he's essentially fading or drawing the shot with a bitchslap that either places his hand slightly leading his wrist or slightly laid back at the wrist at contact. His grip is only as far round as Eastern at best.
I think fading/drawing has its place in shot selection. You pointed it correctly - pushing handle more through the shot vs releasing the wrist more to make racquet “come around” the ball.
@5263 possesses great knowledge on the matter.
 

HuusHould

Professional
I think fading/drawing has its place in shot selection. You pointed it correctly - pushing handle more through the shot vs releasing the wrist more to make racquet “come around” the ball.
@5263 possesses great knowledge on the matter.
I look forward to 5623 expanding on the topic! Yes, I thought that was the case. Sometimes Tomic's footwork would be more suited to the golf course haha
 

5263

G.O.A.T.
I look forward to 5623 expanding on the topic! Yes, I thought that was the case. Sometimes Tomic's footwork would be more suited to the golf course haha
Most all of the top players Fade and Draw shots way more often than people realize. 2 things obscure it from the fan's eyes. First off, most of the court views hide it so that the rare times you see it, you may discount it as a fluke. If you watch more court level video from behind the players you can see it much more clearly. Tomic was a player who used it to an extent that couldn't be ignored, but even the Pro commentators didn't know how to discuss it. Historically it was loosely covered way back in early tennis yrs, but not so clear that you were likely to make the connection. The 2nd reason you often don't see it is that the harder hit pro balls normally don't curve as much as a slower ball can. Any of the grips can work.

You did an exceptional job of noticing the role of the wrist in determination of these 2 types of shot. When the contact is slightly early and the wrist is allowed to release from the 'drag position' to a more neutral position, the contact can cause one of the 'drawing type' spins and when the wrist continues to drag in more or less of a 'laid back' position, you are likely to get one of the 'fade type' spins. I have recognized and teach several common types of Fade and Draw spins for shots and developed a matching system that serves as a guide to know which to hit for a more consistent result. Based on the height of the contact as well if it is rising or falling, you can use the Fade or Draw that will help you to hit your intended Target lane more consistently with the type of spin that serves your purpose. This is a deep topic, so feel free to ask more questions about it.
 

Raul_SJ

G.O.A.T.
This is a deep topic, so feel free to ask more questions about it.
Coaches will typically advise to switch to the Continental grip when attacking the net.
Transition to your "short game" using a single grip for all shots.. So when we get a short ball that bounces inside the service box, we need to have the capability of hitting a Continental forehand while standing inside the service box?
 

Dragy

Legend
Good article to get some basic stuff about applying draw/fade spin:
 

nyta2

Professional
Coaches will typically advise to switch to the Continental grip when attacking the net.
Transition to your "short game" using a single grip for all shots.. So when we get a short ball that bounces inside the service box, we need to have the capability of hitting a Continental forehand while standing inside the service box?
that's what i try to do... my half volley from around the service line ends up being a conti grip fh/bh topspin driver or dipper (depending on where opponent is)
along with eliminating grip changes, conti grip also lets me hit the ball later in my strike zone
 

Raul_SJ

G.O.A.T.
that's what i try to do... my half volley from around the service line ends up being a conti grip fh/bh topspin driver or dipper (depending on where opponent is)
along with eliminating grip changes, conti grip also lets me hit the ball later in my strike zone
How about when there is time to set up. Waist high bounce right in the middle of service box. Switch to normal ground stroke grip or hit a Conti ground stroke?... This will happen more in Doubles. I think I switch to normal ground stroke grip without even thinking about it.... I should probably practice Conti ground strokes for these rare occasions.
 
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nyta2

Professional
How about when there is time to set up. Waist high bounce right in the middle of service box. Switch to normal ground stroke grip or hit a Conti ground stroke?... This will happen more in Doubles. I think I switch to ground stroke grip without even thinking about it.
hehe, i was going to add that part, but was too lazy...
yeah, if time (and generally if net height or higher), i'll switch to a normal baseline groundstroke grip and rip it... will even switch to hit a swinging volley on fh&bh sides too if i get a floater...
that "time" will vary from person to person (recognitionTime+gripchangeTime+movementTime+prepunitturnTime+...)... so probably not a good choice if you're new/intermediate, and struggling to find your grip when switching between fh & bh :)
Have never really practiced Conti ground strokes.
if i'm playing well, i'm getting the ball to bounce in front of you (eg. "at your feet"), so i'm gonna force you to practice it every match :) if you don't make the face more vertical, the tendency will be to float the volley back up to me
 
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HuusHould

Professional
Most all of the top players Fade and Draw shots way more often than people realize. 2 things obscure it from the fan's eyes. First off, most of the court views hide it so that the rare times you see it, you may discount it as a fluke. If you watch more court level video from behind the players you can see it much more clearly.
Yeah, court level view from behind the players I also find shows the pace of the game at pro level to be much more frenetic than it appears from the standard TV angle, which is a bit more of a bird's eye view? The main times I've noticed it is obviously Rafa Nadals banana fh up the line (draw - Sampras used to do the same with a more traditional grip), and a high proportion of the pros off fhs (fade). I also noticed Hewitt and Nalbandian were good exponents of leaning cross court and fading their off bhs the other way. On the women's side of things I think Bianca Andreescu does it well on high fhs. I noticed Konta does it as well when I watched her play Serena live, Ash Barty among others fades her off fh drive volley. Nalbandian from memory would draw his bh pass dtl sometimes, which is the equivalent of using the wind to blow your passing shot back into court after its past the player. I'll respond to the rest of your informative post after a nap as its very late here haha,
 

Raul_SJ

G.O.A.T.
if i'm playing well, i'm getting the ball to bounce in front of you (eg. "at your feet"), so i'm gonna force you to practice it every match :) if
:( This is what happens when I come to net against higher level players. Somehow they dip it right at my feet when I'm standing in the middle of the service box. Ball crosses the net and then suddenly dips. They must have grooved a ground stroke vertical swing path that makes it dip and land really short. If I stay back, they will use their normal ground stroke that lands deep.
 

5263

G.O.A.T.
Yeah, court level view from behind the players I also find shows the pace of the game at pro level to be much more frenetic than it appears from the standard TV angle, which is a bit more of a bird's eye view? The main times I've noticed it is obviously Rafa Nadals banana fh up the line (draw - Sampras used to do the same with a more traditional grip), and a high proportion of the pros off fhs (fade). I also noticed Hewitt and Nalbandian were good exponents of leaning cross court and fading their off bhs the other way. On the women's side of things I think Bianca Andreescu does it well on high fhs. I noticed Konta does it as well when I watched her play Serena live, Ash Barty among others fades her off fh drive volley. Nalbandian from memory would draw his bh pass dtl sometimes, which is the equivalent of using the wind to blow your passing shot back into court after its past the player. I'll respond to the rest of your informative post after a nap as its very late here haha,
THese are the shots that made Nalbandian so special.
 

HuusHould

Professional
The 2nd reason you often don't see it is that the harder hit pro balls normally don't curve as much as a slower ball can. Any of the grips can work.
That's true. Of course they manoeuvre their slower slice bhs with the use of fade/draw sidespin components. Any table tennis player worth their salt will shape their shots even more due to the lighter ball.

You did an exceptional job of noticing the role of the wrist in determination of these 2 types of shot. When the contact is slightly early and the wrist is allowed to release from the 'drag position' to a more neutral position, the contact can cause one of the 'drawing type' spins and when the wrist continues to drag in more or less of a 'laid back' position, you are likely to get one of the 'fade type' spins.
Thanks. From memory Tomic used a bit of a "prestretch" windup at the wrist where he would flex it initially to lever the subsequent extension and then a second flexion of his hand at the wrist through contact. Where contact lies within the second flexion determines whether he fades or draws the shot.

I have recognized and teach several common types of Fade and Draw spins for shots and developed a matching system that serves as a guide to know which to hit for a more consistent result. Based on the height of the contact as well if it is rising or falling, you can use the Fade or Draw that will help you to hit your intended Target lane more consistently with the type of spin that serves your purpose. This is a deep topic, so feel free to ask more questions about it.
I find fade/draw can help you hit a more penetrating shot (than a slice or topspin stroke), with the spin you do put on the ball helping you retain bit of safety, and shaping the shot can also help you disguise the direction -Tomic's shots are a good example of this, where subtle variations in wrist position at contact (that can be altered at the last minute) make all the difference to the direction and shape of the shot. I also find in a lot of situations you can hit a faster shot without needing to get your weight going toward your target during the shot. Eg running around a kick second serve, as a righty to attack a fh, you can fall a bit to the left as you're swinging outside in, which also makes the fade handy when cramped by a body serve as you can move out of the way of the ball and still hit with power. You were saying your method of teaching shaping shots can assist with accuracy as well?
 

5263

G.O.A.T.
You were saying your method of teaching shaping shots can assist with accuracy as well?
By not only learning the various primary shapes that a player should have, but also the teaching a 'shot matching system' that is based on matching the shapes to the elements with contact point context. By using this, it increases your ability to control the ball, therefore your accuracy should improve due to the greater control.
 
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HuusHould

Professional
By not only learning the various primary shapes that a player should have, but also the teaching a 'shot matching system' that is based on matching the shapes to the elements with contact point context. By using this, it increases your ability to control the ball, therefore your accuracy should improve due to the greater control.
I guess it's similar to golf, where if you can shape the drive against the slope of the fairway or against the wind or in the direction of the dogleg you don't have to be as precise with your placement to hit it near the centre of the fairway. (Or a rugby goalkicker who draws the penalty kick from the sideline is effectively reducing the angle of the kick, but it's very hard to fade the kick or even minimise the draw, so the same kicker increases the angle of approach from the other side of the field)
As you mention where tennis differs from the two examples of sports I gave is the varying contact points, it's an open skill and you have to adapt your response to the incoming ball. I'd be interested to see your guidelines for shot selection, you could put it on youtube, unless youre worried about people ripping off your IP!?
 

5263

G.O.A.T.
I guess it's similar to golf, where if you can shape the drive against the slope of the fairway or against the wind or in the direction of the dogleg you don't have to be as precise with your placement to hit it near the centre of the fairway. (Or a rugby goalkicker who draws the penalty kick from the sideline is effectively reducing the angle of the kick, but it's very hard to fade the kick or even minimise the draw, so the same kicker increases the angle of approach from the other side of the field)
As you mention where tennis differs from the two examples of sports I gave is the varying contact points, it's an open skill and you have to adapt your response to the incoming ball. I'd be interested to see your guidelines for shot selection, you could put it on youtube, unless youre worried about people ripping off your IP!?
Great comments and yes, we are working on getting a couple more videos out there, but but the tech side of our team is lacking right now along with how busy we all stay. We are struggling to handle the demand currently. Our book is in the edit phase now now by the Historian who wrote the history of Wimbledon. Once we have the book published, video will become a bigger priority. Also Teachestennis is speaking at the Tennis Historians next meeting.
 
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