Control ability from a racquet

Hay guys,
Is it possible that a frame with 98 headsize has a better control ability and accuracy compared to the 90 or 95. Assume that these rackets have a similar spec(e.g. both hefty, close in the balance point.). Or it is the fact that a racket updated with a bigger headsize is definitely gonna lose some accuracy?

Also, please share with me that what do you think the biggest factor in the frame that affect your accuracy is?
 

SpinToWin

Talk Tennis Guru
Biggest factor affecting accuracy? Likely beam width for me. A thin beam is significantly more accurate than a thick beam. Head size generally is the least significant factor IMHO.
 
Biggest factor affecting accuracy? Likely beam width for me. A thin beam is significantly more accurate than a thick beam. Head size generally is the least significant factor IMHO.

Head size is not a big factor, IF the density of the strings remains the same.
 

SpinToWin

Talk Tennis Guru
Head size is not a big factor, IF the density of the strings remains the same.

That's what I was implying ;)

Basically, I was saying that if you list up all factors that you can change on a racquet, head size will be the least significant (unless it's a huge jump).
 

LapsedNoob

Professional
Ummm, I just don't understand your idea is in the last part.

The makers want you to think their best and newest have all the good qualities of every great stick ever all rolled into one.

Secondly, some small racquet die-hards will never allow a larger racquet to be compared to a smaller player's frame.
 

El_Yotamo

Hall of Fame
IMO this is the list of most important factors for control:
1. Beam width
2. Stiffness
3. String pattern
4. Headsize
5. Everything else (only bc that can be customized and the first 4 can't so it's not a big deal).
Respond if you disagree or have anything else to add!
 
Beam width has more to do with inherent power level with slower swings IMO. A thicker beam gives more free power that can result in a loss of control. I would say stringbed density is tops, followed by weight/swingweight (heavier racquet smoothens out the arm swing - provided you can swing it :) ). Next for me would be the type of string (poly/multi/syngut), and followed by head size.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
It is possible for accuracy to go down if the racket has too low of a TW. TW is very much dependant on the mass of the frame in the head and the dist away from the centerline of the frame. If you hit the ball off center with a low TW racket the racket may be deflected by the ball and effect accuracy. Therefore accuracy very much depends on the player and the specs of the racket.
 

JC11

New User
Great thread. Stringbed has to be the biggest factor. Sounds unanimous, but the stiffness is something I could never get a clear answer. Always heard cases from both sides.
 

SpinToWin

Talk Tennis Guru
Great thread. Stringbed has to be the biggest factor. Sounds unanimous, but the stiffness is something I could never get a clear answer. Always heard cases from both sides.

Stiffness is not a factor in this case IMHO. You have racquets that are stiff and offer huge control, especially on volleys, whereas you have soft sticks that can be quite reminiscent of a trampoline. You can argue both ways.
 
Stiffness is not a factor in this case IMHO. You have racquets that are stiff and offer huge control, especially on volleys, whereas you have soft sticks that can be quite reminiscent of a trampoline. You can argue both ways.

I think stiffness is a factor but it majorly depends on personal favor. Some people like the firm, decisive feel from the stiff racket while others may enjoy tennis balls staying a bit longer on the softer frame so that their shots won't spray like a birdshot whatsoever. It's truly arguable.

My personal favor is a stiffer racket(YouTek speed Pro, currently using) with lower tension poly stringbed which allows me to have a firm, steady feel from the frame yet a nice touch and control which pockets the ball well from the string.

With all that said, What do you guys think that the biggest advantage or specialty you could have with a mid size frame?
 

RanchDressing

Hall of Fame
RA Flex really means very little. Flex is literally a number from a machine pulling down on the top of the head... Not all that similar to how a ball impacts on a stringbed.

Composition and beam design make huge impacts on power and feel.

Twist weight although can help a ton in making a racquet more forgiving and easier to be consistent, I wouldn't say actually gives a racquet more 'control'.

What gives one player good control can give another player a headache. I love low friction soft string hybrid beds, some players love all poly beds.

I would say though, that the feel of a ~90 frame is going to be more precise than a 98... I definitely feel I have more precision with a smaller head size. But the added margin and power on a 98 is worth the loss in 'feel' to me.

Biggest advantage? Might be twistweight/stability. Having a really forgiving frame can give me loads of confidence. But that's totally subjective to the type of game you play, what you like, and just the player in general. Either twist-weight or spin/plowthrough. I lean towards spin/plowthrough but a super stable frame is pretty addicting to play with. Might be why everyone loves the smaller head pro staffs (spin+plowthrough+stability) :)
 
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