Cost to be a Pro

sureshs

Bionic Poster
LOL overall 44% of the pros earned no prize money.


In 2013 there were 8,874 male and 4,862 female players.
Of these 3,896 male and 2,212 female players earned no
prize money
 

HipRotation

Hall of Fame
LOL overall 44% of the pros earned no prize money.


In 2013 there were 8,874 male and 4,862 female players.
Of these 3,896 male and 2,212 female players earned no
prize money
Coincidentally they seemed to have played no ATP or WTA matches either
 
V

VexlanderPrime

Guest
Thanks for posting. It boils down to the unfortunate fact that professional tennis is a sport where the barriers to entry are very high. Even the most elite athlete on the planet won't be winning slams without TONS of support from an early age and a TON of money spent in development.
 

G A S

Hall of Fame
Thanks for posting. It boils down to the unfortunate fact that professional tennis is a sport where the barriers to entry are very high. Even the most elite athlete on the planet won't be winning slams without TONS of support from an early age and a TON of money spent in development.
the travel expenses, coaching expenses, all adds up..
 

accidental

Hall of Fame
Cooincidentaly, this email was sent out to all itf registered players just yesterday. Its about the biggest prize money increase at futures level in a very long time:


Following the recent review of the ITF Pro Circuit, I am pleased to announce that the ITF Board of Directors recently approved an extensive programme of prize money increases for the ITF Pro Circuit. The increases, which will begin a phased introduction from 2016, represent the largest investment into the entry levels of professional tennis since their formation in 1976 (men) and 1984 (women).

On the ITF Men’s Circuit, $15,000 category tournaments will be increased to $25,000 in 2016, while the lower-level $10,000 tournaments will be increased to $15,000 in 2017. Additional rises are currently planned for 2018 and will be announced in due course.

The ITF Women’s Circuit, which currently includes tournaments between $10,000 and $100,000, will see the elimination of the $15,000 category in 2016 with the view that these tournaments will offer $25,000 in prize money. In 2017 prize money levels will rise to between $15,000 and $125,000, ahead of further proposed increases in 2018.

In order that that the prize money increases are as effective as possible, the ITF will look to ensure that all prize money categories are geographically spread with a set number of job opportunities each week. The phasing of the prize money increases will also allow the ITF to assess the impact of the initial rises on tournament numbers and job opportunities and to ensure that developing nations are not priced out of hosting professional events.

The full findings of the ITF Pro Circuit review can be found at: http://www.itftennis.com/procircuit/about-pro-circuit/pro-circuit-review.aspx



We will keep you updated on progress, but in the meantime if you have any questions or observations we would ask you to share them with us via the ITF Pro Circuit team: ProCircuitReview@itftennis.com

Kind Regards
ITF Pro Circuit Department
www.itftennis.com
 

Aretium

Hall of Fame
Cooincidentaly, this email was sent out to all itf registered players just yesterday. Its about the biggest prize money increase at futures level in a very long time:


Following the recent review of the ITF Pro Circuit, I am pleased to announce that the ITF Board of Directors recently approved an extensive programme of prize money increases for the ITF Pro Circuit. The increases, which will begin a phased introduction from 2016, represent the largest investment into the entry levels of professional tennis since their formation in 1976 (men) and 1984 (women).

On the ITF Men’s Circuit, $15,000 category tournaments will be increased to $25,000 in 2016, while the lower-level $10,000 tournaments will be increased to $15,000 in 2017. Additional rises are currently planned for 2018 and will be announced in due course.

The ITF Women’s Circuit, which currently includes tournaments between $10,000 and $100,000, will see the elimination of the $15,000 category in 2016 with the view that these tournaments will offer $25,000 in prize money. In 2017 prize money levels will rise to between $15,000 and $125,000, ahead of further proposed increases in 2018.

In order that that the prize money increases are as effective as possible, the ITF will look to ensure that all prize money categories are geographically spread with a set number of job opportunities each week. The phasing of the prize money increases will also allow the ITF to assess the impact of the initial rises on tournament numbers and job opportunities and to ensure that developing nations are not priced out of hosting professional events.

The full findings of the ITF Pro Circuit review can be found at: http://www.itftennis.com/procircuit/about-pro-circuit/pro-circuit-review.aspx



We will keep you updated on progress, but in the meantime if you have any questions or observations we would ask you to share them with us via the ITF Pro Circuit team: ProCircuitReview@itftennis.com

Kind Regards
ITF Pro Circuit Department
www.itftennis.com
Not sure how much difference it will make, but a step in the right direction!
 

Al Czervik

Hall of Fame
Let's take a guy who is 50-100. Do they have any expenses and costs paid by sponsors? If not, I don't think it is worth it. 1-20 obviously is. I would think 20-50 is. After that, I don't know.
 

G A S

Hall of Fame
Let's take a guy who is 50-100. Do they have any expenses and costs paid by sponsors? If not, I don't think it is worth it. 1-20 obviously is. I would think 20-50 is. After that, I don't know.
If at that level they got no sponsor financial help, I doubt the tennis level of today would be what it is.

Not sure how much difference it will make, but a step in the right direction!
Certainly.
 

donquijote

G.O.A.T.
From the research report:
"The Top 1 % of ranked male players [top 50] earned 60% of the
total prize money pool
The Top 1 % ranked female players [top 26] earned 51% of the
total prize money pool"

Sounds like better than the real economy for the poorer.
 
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