Could you win a point off a top 100 player?

andrehanderson

Semi-Pro
Assuming they are trying their best to win every point, could you win a single point off a top player in 2 sets?

For arguments sake, let's take out of the equation any total brain lapses they might experience out of boredom.
 

TennisCJC

Legend
I think 1 point would be possible. Especially if you are just playing for 1 point. I think I could possibly get 1 decent shot to force an error or more likely some defensive shot that comes off at a crazy angle for a winner. No way I could win a game.
 

ballmachineguy

Professional
I have never been on the other side of the net from that kind of talent but I’d like to think so. Crossing my fingers for a lucky net cord.
 

Kralingen

Legend
1 or 2 points yes. I feel like I could just rip shots as hard as I possibly can and eventually one might land in, plus he may make an error or two.

5 points that are honestly won and not just netcord/opponent UE/luck? Not in my wildest dreams.

A pro opponent isn’t going to DF or hit UEs, he’s going to hit a safe kick serve to your BH which will elicit a weak reply at best and then come volley one away. If you do get into a rally he doesnt have to go for anything and could happily just keep hitting the ball corner to corner with topspin. These guys could rally without errors for years on end compared to our shot tolerance.

we must remember that they only make errors bc they’re trying to win points against other professionals. Even though I’m 25 and in shape I know I would look horrendously stupid. It would be truly humiliating to play a pro, especially one my age or younger than me.
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
Yes, I believe I could win several points. I have mastered getting wickedly-framed serves & other shots into play. Impossible to read and often challenging to play. I expect to get a few freebies that way.

On cleaner shots, I would screech precisely at impact to mask the sound of my contact. I would follow this up with another screech during their forward swing. "Accidental" screeching during the upper swing of their serve as well. Possibly, a few more points from this tactic
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
Assuming they are trying their best to win every point, could you win a single point off a top player in 2 sets?

For arguments sake, let's take out of the equation any total brain lapses they might experience out of boredom.
Points will be won but games? No way.

Anecdotally, I entered a USTA 35 age bracket tournament in another Florida city about 30 years ago. No ranking so no seed, deservedly so. I just called the night before for my first match start time. Upon receiving the info I was also told I would need to play two rounds on Saturday if I won my first match.

Drove over the next morning and checked in. My opponent was right behind me and looked to be a youngish in shape 35 so I thought I might have a tussle. I won 0&0.

Returning to the desk, the TD suggested I get some rest and body fuel. My next opponent was the #1 seed.

TD was right. When he introduced himself I heard an Aussie twang so I name dropped that another Aussie teaches me in Orlando, “Do you know David Carter?” The response basically sealed my fate, “Know him? David and I won three ATP doubles titles together!”

a double bagel later (about an hour) I had learned what is like to play a pro tour quality opponent, retired from the circuit for several years. I won points in both sets and even got to deuce once on his serve with a couple of nice returns and a semi-SABR move out of desperation.

Afterwards, Paul Kronk told me to stick with David and fix that forehand but leave that sweet 2-handed backhand alone, the same advice I had received years before from Dennis van de Meer at his academy in Hilton Head.

Great learning experience! I left at exactly .500 in games won but learned so much more in the process of going from penthouse to outhouse.
 

Pass750

Rookie
People are saying they could rip a winner or two, but on the receiving end of serves, you will get aced, no return or if you do get it back it will be a weak return that will promptly be hit for a winner.

Serving would give people a better chance but I figure return will be hit for a winner or put you in an extreme defensive position not a shot down the middle that you could hit like you normally do.
 
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stringertom

Bionic Poster
People are saying they could rip a winner or two, but on the receiving end of serves, you will get aced, no return or if you do get it back it will be a weak return that will promptly be hit for a winner.

Serving would give people a better but I figure return will be hit for a winner or put you in an extreme defensive position not a shot down the middle that you could hit like you normally do.
Depends on court surface. I got waxed on clay but it wasn’t 4 aces/unreturned serves in a row at all. On hard, I might not have been able to get to deuce on his serve but I did just that on clay.
 

davced1

Hall of Fame
Probably based on that I've seen a player at my level (4.0 probably but we don't really have that system here so not sure) win several points against a player ranked just outside the top 1000, that should translate to me winning at least one point vs a top 100 player.
 

ChaelAZ

G.O.A.T.
Assuming they are trying their best to win every point, could you win a single point off a top player in 2 sets?

For arguments sake, let's take out of the equation any total brain lapses they might experience out of boredom.
Sure, it is entirely possible I can win a point.
 

Alexrb

Semi-Pro
Points will be won but games? No way.

Anecdotally, I entered a USTA 35 age bracket tournament in another Florida city about 30 years ago. No ranking so no seed, deservedly so. I just called the night before for my first match start time. Upon receiving the info I was also told I would need to play two rounds on Saturday if I won my first match.

Drove over the next morning and checked in. My opponent was right behind me and looked to be a youngish in shape 35 so I thought I might have a tussle. I won 0&0.

Returning to the desk, the TD suggested I get some rest and body fuel. My next opponent was the #1 seed.

TD was right. When he introduced himself I heard an Aussie twang so I name dropped that another Aussie teaches me in Orlando, “Do you know David Carter?” The response basically sealed my fate, “Know him? David and I won three ATP doubles titles together!”

a double bagel later (about an hour) I had learned what is like to play a pro tour quality opponent, retired from the circuit for several years. I won points in both sets and even got to deuce once on his serve with a couple of nice returns and a semi-SABR move out of desperation.

Afterwards, Paul Kronk told me to stick with David and fix that forehand but leave that sweet 2-handed backhand alone, the same advice I had received years before from Dennis van de Meer at his academy in Hilton Head.

Great learning experience! I left at exactly .500 in games won but learned so much more in the process of going from penthouse to outhouse.
Great story. I wonder if I know Paul's son, Ben Kronk (and Daughter Abby). I think his family runs Tarpon Tennis which I play out of USTA wise. Never hit with Paul, but Ben is pretty unreal.

Do you remember what city the tournament was in?
 

Fairhit

Professional
If I would seriously wager anything, I would say yes, I think I can win a few points vs a top 100 player, a complete match could possibly be 2-4 points won by me vs 48 won by him.

I'm taking a group class over here, the teaching pro just turned 40, he won some ATP points a long time ago, somo other teaching pro told me he was a good prospect that the only thing keeping him from really breaking into the top 1000 ranking was his temper, he used to break racquets too often and his dad told him he would retire his support unless he changed, he didn't and his dad had to fulfill his threat.

This teaching pro sometimes plays with us, you can see that he's toying with us, the best shot from me, one that normally would be a winner is too easy to get for him, he can rip winner from anywhere in the court and Ive had many rallies where I'm playing totally focused, high speed balls and for me those are high level, for him are almost neutral balls, he then would decide he wants to balst a winner and simply does it, it is akin to me playing with a child, the gap is simply too wide to comprehend, if he played me in a match, I'm certain he would win easily almost every point easily, I could count on him making an unforced error now and then and on me forcing an error maybe 3 or 4 times per set.

With a top 100 player any 5.0 would look like a 2.0 looks to a 5.0.
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
I'd swing out of my boots and hope for a frame shot surprise. That would be the only way. Because otherwise the game will never be on my racket.

And I'd play their serve like a soccer goalie and guess one way or the other just to have a chance at a return. Just need one net cord baby.
 

Fairhit

Professional
I'd swing out of my boots and hope for a frame shot surprise. That would be the only way. Because otherwise the game will never be on my racket.

And I'd play their serve like a soccer goalie and guess one way or the other just to have a chance at a return. Just need one net cord baby.
That's the point, a neutral ATP shot is too much to handle for us mere mortals, why would they even feel the need to risk a net cord shot when they can win with shots going one meter over the net? My only weapon would be to make them fail some shot from laughter or make them take pity on me and let me win a point, outside of those options, I'm at a loss as for what a tactic I should use.
 

davced1

Hall of Fame
That's the point, a neutral ATP shot is too much to handle for us mere mortals, why would they even feel the need to risk a net cord shot when they can win with shots going one meter over the net? My only weapon would be to make them fail some shot from laughter or make them take pity on me and let me win a point, outside of those options, I'm at a loss as for what a tactic I should use.
How good is your serve? Some rec players have decent serves even by ATP standards and to follow up a good serve with a net attack, old school S&V seems like a good strategy to me, that way at least you have some control of the outcome of the point.
 

FloridaAG

Professional
Perhaps - we play against a pro from South America who just turned 30 (so not far in age from tour days) - he was on tour and is probably the best player I have ever played against. Grew up playing Schwartzman and the other South Americans of that age. We can win points off him even when he is trying max - although not many
 

cha cha

Professional
We had an ATP top 200 guy in my league after the first lockdown when there was no tennis in the world, and he lost 1 game in 4 singles matches.
Hard to estimate the level of the opposition. We do not do USTA here, and I did not play him. If I had to guess, the no. 1 singles guy on my team is probably a good 5.0 in your ratings. He did get double bagelled. Not without winning points.
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
That's the point, a neutral ATP shot is too much to handle for us mere mortals, why would they even feel the need to risk a net cord shot when they can win with shots going one meter over the net? My only weapon would be to make them fail some shot from laughter or make them take pity on me and let me win a point, outside of those options, I'm at a loss as for what a tactic I should use.
No, I'm the one that needs to hit the net cord. I wouldn't hit anything safe back. Low shots only hoping for that one net cord winner.
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
No.

I play chess and it's easier to see the levels because people have numerical ratings that they earn by playing matches. There's a big difference every 200 points. A top grandmaster may be rated 2,800 and almost always beat a 2,600. Beginners are around 500-800. A lot of amateurs are 1,300 to 1,800. You can see levels of the game by watching matches where there's a big ratings mismatch. The differences in depth, analysis, memorized openings, tactical and strategic insights is just huge.

I see tennis as similar. Sure, there are more variables such as injuries, wind, sun, etc. But the difference and number of levels is too much.
 

spottishwood

Semi-Pro
You would never even get a chance to attack a ball, most of us would never get past the serve let alone any kind of rally.
Not really. I didn't say I'll attack on my serve. I'll just try to stand a bit back and attack while receiving. Unless my opponent is a big server, I'll have my chances.
 
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Daniel Andrade

Hall of Fame
Simply going all out on all of my serves, two first serves per point, and I would win at least one, I would lose 6-0 6-0, but win at least a point
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
Great story. I wonder if I know Paul's son, Ben Kronk (and Daughter Abby). I think his family runs Tarpon Tennis which I play out of USTA wise. Never hit with Paul, but Ben is pretty unreal.

Do you remember what city the tournament was in?
Clearwater
 
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