CPR/First Aid/AED Training-- Get it if you can!

kingcheetah

Hall of Fame
A few weeks ago, I participated in a social doubles event at my club, and a player had a cardiac arrest during the warmup. We were going through the normal warm up progression(baseline shots, alternating turns at net) on half of a court, and then the guy I was hitting with (probably in his 60s, but plays a fair amount of tennis) bent over with his elbows on his knees facing the back tarp-- I couldn't really tell if he was winded, his back was bothering him, or he was looking for something like a contact lens or a dampener. Another rally later, he does the same thing. Never did he touch his chest.

The pro leading the event could see that I was trying to figure out what was happening, and switched places with me to check on him. Then the guy I'd been hitting with walks over to the bench. A veteran coach that has been in the profession for a long time had seen all of this, and was already on the phone with emergency personnel. He came down to the court, still on the phone. I'd worked at the club previously, so I knew we needed to send a different person to notify the front desk that emergency personnel had been called and to contact security as well. I ran off court to deal with that, and almost instantly the player lost consciousness(I found this out when I returned to the court) We sent a different club member to look for medical professionals that might be in the building, while I waited to meet the EMT team. In this short time, the man had gone into cardiac arrest, and another player (a MD in research) began CPR while others located an AED, and we found a Nurse Practitioner (that works in Cardiology, of all things)

EMT response time was fast(they arrived as the AED was being set up), and the man's heart was restarted before they left the facility, although he was far from stable. He did make it to the hospital, and has recognition of family members (I haven't heard additional updates since) I later found out that the survival rate of a cardiac arrest outside of a hospital is 15%.

While we were fortunate to have a professional with intuition and medical professionals there, as well as equipment and a fast-responding team of EMTs, I think it was an eye-opener for the importance of being familiar with what to do in emergency situations.
 
All that training is great to have: the life you save could be a loved one [if not yours then someone else's].

1st Aid, CPR, AED, Heimlich, life-threatening blood loss, etc. It's better to have it and not need it than need it and not have it.
 

hochiglenn

New User
I was diagnosed with a heart conduction problem about 10 years ago and have had an ICD/pacemaker for 10 years since I was 41. I have had 3 sudden cardiac arrest on the court which my device has saved me from. Until I had this problem I never realized how widespread sudden cardiac arrest is. Now I know that if I see someone drop suddenly it is very likely a cardiac event. When I had my first cardiac arrest on court I awoke with a circle of people watching me lie there. Had I not had the device to shock me I wouldn’t be here. It took the ambulance about 10-15 minutes to get there. I think most people don’t know what to do and they are probably in a state of disbelief. I know better now and try to educate people whenever I can.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
I was diagnosed with a heart conduction problem about 10 years ago and have had an ICD/pacemaker for 10 years since I was 41. I have had 3 sudden cardiac arrest on the court which my device has saved me from. Until I had this problem I never realized how widespread sudden cardiac arrest is. Now I know that if I see someone drop suddenly it is very likely a cardiac event. When I had my first cardiac arrest on court I awoke with a circle of people watching me lie there. Had I not had the device to shock me I wouldn’t be here. It took the ambulance about 10-15 minutes to get there. I think most people don’t know what to do and they are probably in a state of disbelief. I know better now and try to educate people whenever I can.
So if an AED wasn't available, the only option is CPR?
 

hochiglenn

New User
If you are in VFib like I was you have to get shocked or you will die. My ICD is in my chest and can detect the arrhythmia and shock my heart to stop the quivering.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
I had something tachycarida from dyhydration last year. In that case you need a specific drug to reset your heart rate - so you need to go to the ER to get it. It's not a common drug at all. The doctor at my ER said that she had never administered it before. That heart event is the main reason I got a fitness tracker with HRM.
 
Top