Critique My Serve

zabarboon

New User
Ignore the foot fault. I've been working on coiling and generating more power from my lower half.
 
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You probably can already see for yourself, but you're weight is falling towards your left too much after contact. You can't see it well from this angle but you're tossing arm isn't vertical enough. Try lowering your right hip during the coil phase to naturally lift your tossing arm more vertically above you and allow yourself to uncoil upwards and forwards rather than to the left.
 

Kevo

Legend
The toss is the most important thing in the serve, and we can't see it in the video. What I can see is your back shoulder and arm aren't getting out of the way and you end up with your arms crossed. That's definitely a sign of a problem. You also look off balance as FightMeAtTheNet mentioned. Both of those things could be toss related. A lot of it looks good however you aren't turning the racquet over as much as I would like to see. That could be toss related as well, or just not having the right swing path intention. A lot of people think they should swing their arm through the ball, but that's not really correct.

Take another video from an angle where the toss and contact are clearly visible as well. Preferably more than one angle so we can judge locations better in more than one dimension.
 
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Chas Tennis

G.O.A.T.
Have the person videoing stand back farther so that the racket is fully in the frame.

Video outdoors in direct sunlight so that your camera will select a faster shutter speed and there will be less motion blur.

In addition, move the camera closer to get clear high speed videos of your upper arm (between elbow and shoulder). Short sleeve shirt or sleeveless. Pick lighting so that shadows around the elbow area show in the video, this can directly indicate internal shoulder rotation (ISR). You might be doing ISR but the only thing to see in the OP video is a silhouette of your arm with motion blur.

A camera view from behind looking along the ball's trajectory shows some useful angles.
 
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Mountain Ghost

Professional
The biggest issue is chasing a wild toss. First ... get set for at least a second ... with no movement at all. Second ... keep your arm straight during the toss. Lastly ... if your tossing arm comes up on a line toward the right net post ... you can easily avoid what's happening now with your relatively parallel-to-the-baseline toss ... which is tossing off to your left ... and falling over that way ~ MG
 

Digital Atheist

Professional
Have the person videoing stand back farther so that the racket is fully in the frame.

Video outdoors in direct sunlight so that your camera will select a faster shutter speed and there will be less motion blur.

In addition, move the camera closer to get clear high speed videos of your upper arm (between elbow and shoulder). Short sleeve shirt or sleeveless. Pick lighting so that shadows around the elbow area show in the video, this can directly indicate internal shoulder rotation (ISR). You might be doing ISR but the only thing to see in the OP video is a silhouette of your arm with motion blur.

A camera view from behind looking along the ball's trajectory shows some useful angles.
And please use landscape orientation.

To the OP; looks like some good stuff going on there, certainly falling left, but as others have stated we need better video coverage to make any further definitive statements.
 

5263

G.O.A.T.
could we see more comments on what this guy is getting right? I know he is asking for help, but Imo helping to lock in some of his many good points is very helpful in the process. He seems to actually overdo some of the good things to an extent. Great racket drop, leading up with the elbow, launch up, shoulder turn. I saw a lot of the right pieces in place and think he should focus on timing and putting it all together more fluently.

I'd start with improving the toss location and a focus on keeping the tossing arm up longer.
 
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