Cross Weaving Tools

#1
Hi Everyone,
Nate Pagel, the Assistant Director of the United States Racquet Stringers Association, has been evaluating tools and gadgets designed to make it easier to weave the crosses when stringing racquets. The USRSA plans to publish an article on these tools in an upcoming issue of their magazine. Nate has requested feedback from stringers who own and use tools such as the StringWeaver, the Stringway MK2, and any other devices currently on the market. Here is a copy of his USRSA Facebook post:


U.S. Racquet Stringers Association
10 hrs ·
STRINGING GADGETS AND TOOLS... Over the last couple of months we have been testing a couple of new gadgets that assist in weaving cross strings... We are gathering our experience with these and would like to get your input... Have you found a gadget or tool that is especially helpful to you? Send your thoughts to Nate at: Nate@RacquetTech.com
 
#3
It is a promo pitch for one product and not even close to a review of the various devices available. I will stick to the cross weaving tools I was born with.
 
#4
I think the only benefit is less friction and tension loss (if tensioning while strings are lifted) vs speed in weaving. I do better weaving on my own.

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
 
#5
I think the only benefit is less friction and tension loss (if tensioning while strings are lifted) vs speed in weaving.
Less friction is a significant advantage in that there is less damage done to the coating of the strings when pulling the crosses. Your strings may last longer if the coating is not damaged. There is also less "stiction." In a recent post on the International Alliance of Racquet Technicians website the renowned stringer John Gugel states "Reducing or eliminating stiction can result in a much more consistent and uniform string bed."

I get feedback from professional stringers who use the StringWeaver and a frequent comment is that stringing is more pleasant and easier on the fingertips, particularly with stiff polyester strings in a dense pattern. This is important to them when they must string many racquets in succession. The tool is also very helpful when they are teaching someone to string, as it simplifies the weaving of the crosses.

It is a promo pitch for one product and not even close to a review of the various devices available. I will stick to the cross weaving tools I was born with.
I learned from Nate Pagel, the author of the review published in Tennis Industry magazine, that the magazine editors chose to break his original (and much longer) article into several pieces to be published in the coming months. That is why only one product was highlighted and details of his review were removed. However, if you wish to read a more comprehensive review of the StringWeaver, you can check out the thread entitled "My Review of a New Cross Stringing Tool" on this forum. Also another review written by a professional stringer can be found by searching for Guts and Glory Tennis and clicking on the Blog button.
 
#6
Less friction is a significant advantage in that there is less damage done to the coating of the strings when pulling the crosses. Your strings may last longer if the coating is not damaged. There is also less "stiction." In a recent post on the International Alliance of Racquet Technicians website the renowned stringer John Gugel states "Reducing or eliminating stiction can result in a much more consistent and uniform string bed."

I get feedback from professional stringers who use the StringWeaver and a frequent comment is that stringing is more pleasant and easier on the fingertips, particularly with stiff polyester strings in a dense pattern. This is important to them when they must string many racquets in succession. The tool is also very helpful when they are teaching someone to string, as it simplifies the weaving of the crosses.


I learned from Nate Pagel, the author of the review published in Tennis Industry magazine, that the magazine editors chose to break his original (and much longer) article into several pieces to be published in the coming months. That is why only one product was highlighted and details of his review were removed. However, if you wish to read a more comprehensive review of the StringWeaver, you can check out the thread entitled "My Review of a New Cross Stringing Tool" on this forum. Also another review written by a professional stringer can be found by searching for Guts and Glory Tennis and clicking on the Blog button.
I actually own one. However, I don't quite have the hang of using it yet and still do my crossed the old way.

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
 
#7
I am just not comfortable with the thought of stretching the mains when doing the crosses. It "feels" to me like by the time the job is finished the strings have already lost a percentage of its elasticity thereby reducing its life. I don't know. It's just a feeling. But it looks certainly handy when doing a poly/gut string job.

EDIT: And would this not be bad for the mains in a full gut job?
 

norcal

Hall of Fame
#8
I am just not comfortable with the thought of stretching the mains when doing the crosses. It "feels" to me like by the time the job is finished the strings have already lost a percentage of its elasticity thereby reducing its life. I don't know. It's just a feeling. But it looks certainly handy when doing a poly/gut string job.

EDIT: And would this not be bad for the mains in a full gut job?
You are not moving the mains much, I think the first few balls you hit would have much more effect on the strings than using the tool would.

As for second question I don't understand why it would be bad for a full gut job, one of the benefits if using the tool is avoiding notching the mains, which is particularly important when stringing with gut.
 
#9
You are not moving the mains much, I think the first few balls you hit would have much more effect on the strings than using the tool would.

As for second question I don't understand why it would be bad for a full gut job, one of the benefits if using the tool is avoiding notching the mains, which is particularly important when stringing with gut.
I meant for the gut mains which I feel would suffer through constant stretching by the tool.
 
#11
If it can be proven that this tool does not harm or adversely affect the elasticity of the mains in any way especially with gut I wouldn't mind getting a pair (open and close patterns).
 
#12
Norcal is exactly correct. The StringWeaver deflects the mains a little less than 1/8 inch which results in a "stretch" of less than one-tenth of one percent, easily shown with a little geometry. Look at high speed photos and you will see that the deflection of the strings when striking a tennis ball is huge by comparison.
Professional stringers who use the StringWeaver like the tool when stringing gut specifically because it is gentle on the strings and the coating is much less likely to be damaged when pulling the crosses. Also, one pro did tests on his own, stringing the same racquet multiple times with and without the StringWeaver and measured the String Bed Stiffness each time. He found no difference in the results.
 
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