CT-Topspin Development Thread

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by CT-Topspin, Jul 11, 2018.

  1. CT-Topspin

    CT-Topspin Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2017
    Messages:
    227
    Location:
    New England Region
    So I'm excited to finally have the opportunity to post one of my match videos for you guys all to critique. It took me several hours to trim the videos down with a free editor, and when it was all said and done I still couldn't merge all the clips together like I had wanted to. The best I could pare everything down into was 20 minute clips. The editor gave me some nonsense message about the videos being different resolutions and that they can't be merged. I'm not sure how that's possible given that they were all taken on my phone but I digress.

    Watching this video was pretty eye opening for me. I wouldn't have ever known about the glaring flaws in my technique had I not seen it for myself. It was a bit of a blow to the ego to see that I'm not as good as I thought I was but I think it's necessary to grow and develop. These videos are going to help pinpoint weaknesses in my game so that I can engage in the appropriate practice to smooth the imperfections out.

    I'm the guy in the green shirt and white hat. The guy I've been playing is pretty consistent, can hit deep and is a solid defensive retriever. I lost two sets 7-5, 6-2. We usually go back and forth on winning sets but today wasn't all that great for me.

    For reference, I'm 25 years old and picked up the sport 1.5 years ago. I've been playing about 4-5 times a week since then. During the summer it's about 6 days a week. Any advice on how to best optimize development is always appreciated.





    Some of my takeaways from the video were as follows:

    - Need to hit out more on the serve
    - Need to keep left arm up
    - I'm too upright and tight on groundstrokes. There is a lot of power left on the table that I could be taking advantage of by getting low, loading up, and driving through my shots
    - I'm hitting way too many open stance forehands
    - My footwork isn't as active as it could be
    - Need more consistent shot depth
    - My RHS is much slower than I thought! I need to work on getting that whipping motion down
    - Overall I seem tenative and stiff

    @J011yroger @nytennisaddict @S&V-not_dead_yet @TimeToPlaySets @Curious @FiReFTW @rogerroger917
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2018
    Shroud likes this.
    #1
  2. mad dog1

    mad dog1 Legend

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2010
    Messages:
    7,884
    Location:
    13 Elm St, Baker, CA 96666
    Kudos for posting a video!

    Some feedback...No racquet drop on the serve. Waiters tray going on as well.

    Bh slice needs a lot of work. Too much arm and too wristy.

    No unit turn on the groundstrokes. Fh groundstroke is all arm. Chest is facing the net.

    If you have the money, I recommend you get some lessons from a good coach now before your bad technique becomes more ingrained over time. The good? You are still very young and have lots of time to improve your game. Enjoy the journey and have lots of fun!
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2018
    Shroud likes this.
    #2
  3. CT-Topspin

    CT-Topspin Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2017
    Messages:
    227
    Location:
    New England Region
    Thanks for the feedback!

    I do go to a coach about once a week for a lesson. He's getting me to work on closing up and also on developing the backhand.

    Waiters tray is keeping the racquet face open through the serve without the snap at the end? I feel like I can see that snap in my serve unless im misinterpreting you. I know I have to drop the racquet too. That's a progression I'm working on adding in practice and drills. I will keep it in mind my next serve practice!

    I definitely don't want to ingrain any bad technique. I've put in a lot of effort to try to avoid that already. I guess I'm failing. I'll keep plugging away
     
    #3
  4. FiReFTW

    FiReFTW Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2016
    Messages:
    3,176
    @mad dog1 already wrote most what I noticed aswell.

    You open the racquet towards the ball on serve and swing instead of swinging on edge and then turning the strings to the ball.

    I like how you extend ur left arm with ur FH, now just focus on having it extended sideways along the baseline and it should fix ur non existant body rotation on ur FH and help get ur body involved.
     
    #4
  5. TimeToPlaySets

    TimeToPlaySets Legend

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2012
    Messages:
    5,107
    Good job posting a video unlike most cowards on this forum.

    If you're serious about editing video, look into buying a cheap entry-level video editor.
    It will be a worthy investment in yourself, and applies to more than tennis.

    Next time, try to angle the camera a little better.

    Coaching is a no-brainer, but most people here will mock you if you get coaching. Ignore them.
    Around here, people who get coaching are unathletic sucker trying to buy generic ability who are getting scammed by greedy unscrupulous coaches.
    That said, most rec coaches are useless, and you need one that you really feel gets it.

    https://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/ind...aches-can-actually-coach-worth-a-damn.579380/
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2018
    CT-Topspin likes this.
    #5
  6. TimeToPlaySets

    TimeToPlaySets Legend

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2012
    Messages:
    5,107
    Seeing yourself in video is always disappointing.
    It feels like you're crushing it, and the video looks like pattycake.

    You seem to have a nice controlled swing. Not overhitting. Well done. I think this is partly due to you playing older weaker players.
    When I got back into tennis with a group of 3.5 bashers and that really skewed how I play, and needed to dial it back and learn to be a smart pusher.

    Excellent vertical arm on your serve. I wish I could do that.

    8:38
    hooking !!

    9:20
    Why did the rush the net?
    You hit a short ball to his FH.
    This will backfire when you play stronger opponents.


    11:10
    Excellent unit turn for the ROS.
    You have an excellent unit turn for a beginner.

    11:17
    My D1 coach told me to clear the net by 6-10 feet.
    You need to hit higher and deeper. More topspin.

    11:35
    Excellent controlled ROS, and not trying to crush it.
    Great instinct for the game.

    12:55
    You seem to have a very nice serve.
    Chest is up, vertical trophy.
    [​IMG]

    13:09
    Too low.
    Defensive ball, pulled wide, lob it up.

    16:48
    Many of your FH's are landing short, in the service box.
    Even on neutral balls.
    I think your BH is better than you FH in one respect.
    You clear the net by more, and land it deeper.

    Keep hitting out, and serving big.
    You will lose to 3.0 players while you find your swing.
    That opponent will have the same game a year from now,
    while you may have transformed yours.
    Ignore match scores and play your big strokes.

    https://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/ind...trokes-and-lose-6-0-6-0-support-group.598316/

    https://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/ind...aches-can-actually-coach-worth-a-damn.579380/
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2018
    #6
  7. ptuanminh

    ptuanminh Professional

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2014
    Messages:
    868
    I like your forehand. Its simple, compact stroke, repeatable. Over time you will develop more power and control.
    Your backhand needs some work. Need to get low sideway, hit the ball from low to high, put some topspin on it.
     
    #7
  8. rogerroger917

    rogerroger917 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2017
    Messages:
    1,718
    The problem is you see the stroke as a set of poses. That is why beginners always look stiff and awkward. Your feet are always in the wrong orientation for the ball you are receiving. When the serious juniors start training with a coach all those hand feeds? That sets up the footwork patterns for all the different spots on the court. You only do one thing. And there is at minimum 5 footwork patterns/orientations of stroke just on the fh alone. You have 1.

    Move, correct movement to get to the right body alignment for the specific spot on the court and the intended shot, the footwork and load into the stroke itself, and the recovery footwork. It's all one flow.

    The footwork and the stroke and then recovery is all one thing.

    You look about the same level of development as ttps. Same amount of time in tennis it seems. He looks more polished but the exact same fundamental issues. Jerky motion and lack of proper whole stroke mechanics.

    Find the coach that is out there hand feeding the top juniors in your club or town. See what he tells them how to move and hit the ball. Get him to do the same to you. Its repetition.
    Controlled repetition so you are able to reproduce the exact footwork and stroke mechanics needed for a specific scenario.

    John Yandels site has great articles on it. He also has a whole large segment devoted exactly to your issues of setting up your feet and what exactly your feet should be doing on each specific shot. Most basic and online coaches teach some stroke but they ommit the footwork pattern to get into and out of the shot. That is the advanced stuff. The whole stroke. The good stuff. The boring repetitive stuff that makes advanced tennis players. Not ATP flip this or flip that. Cart before the horse.
     
    CT-Topspin likes this.
    #8
  9. J011yroger

    J011yroger G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2007
    Messages:
    18,174
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    Buy yourself a medicine ball and go throw it at a wall for half an hour a few times per week.

    Do like 20 on your forehand side and 20 on your backhand side. Stop when you start to get tired and rest. Better to do 10 minutes of quality than 30 minutes of trash.

    I don't think your serve is too waiter's trayish. I think your arm is too tight on the drop, just relax as much as possible. Practice with minimal effort.

    J
     
    BulldogLouisiana likes this.
    #9
  10. FiReFTW

    FiReFTW Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2016
    Messages:
    3,176
    @rogerroger917 has a good point, I can relate to what he is saying.
    The footwork and strokes should be made in a natural way which promotes the most natural and effective way to do something so that you are using ur whole body naturaly.

    The problem most people have including which I had at the start of my tennis journey is that they watch pro footage and see something and then try to copy it.
    Like pro players exploding into the air when hitting a FH for example.

    But the difference is that the pro doesnt jump into the air conciously, but he uses his whole kinetic chain and body naturally to explode and use his body to hit the shot, and the legs get airbirne because of so much push and force.

    Meanwhile new players just copy that airborne thing and jump in the air snd then swing and are completely disconnected in all body segments and its not natural but forced and jerky and armed.

    @J011yroger has great advice, throwing the medicine ball will give u a good feeling of using ur whole body naturally in sync, tennis stroke should be just like that in ideal circumstances.
     
    J011yroger likes this.
    #10
  11. BulldogLouisiana

    BulldogLouisiana New User

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2014
    Messages:
    44
    I've been meaning to buy a medicine ball and start doing this. I've never actually used a medicine ball, is there a recommended weight to use..or is it just use the heaviest you can with good form?
     
    #11
  12. rogerroger917

    rogerroger917 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2017
    Messages:
    1,718
    6 lbs.
     
    BulldogLouisiana likes this.
    #12
  13. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2005
    Messages:
    48,787
    Dude you play much worse than me and I am more than twice your age
     
    #13
  14. J011yroger

    J011yroger G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2007
    Messages:
    18,174
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    I think mine is 12#. The idea is to have it be too heavy to throw with just your arms.

    J
     
    #14
  15. ptuanminh

    ptuanminh Professional

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2014
    Messages:
    868
    i think your tennis video has been around.
     
    CT-Topspin and rchjr2091 like this.
    #15
  16. ptuanminh

    ptuanminh Professional

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2014
    Messages:
    868
    I usually do this. Is it a good substitute for throwing medicine ball?
     
    #16
  17. J011yroger

    J011yroger G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2007
    Messages:
    18,174
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    No, that's good for balance and stability though.

    J
     
    ptuanminh likes this.
    #17
  18. nytennisaddict

    nytennisaddict Legend

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2007
    Messages:
    8,459
    how are you judging him... but the number of bounces he allows before hitting it?
    if that's the case you're 2-3x better than him.
     
    J011yroger and rogerroger917 like this.
    #18
  19. CT-Topspin

    CT-Topspin Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2017
    Messages:
    227
    Location:
    New England Region
    I'm down for a challenge match the next time I visit San Diego Suresh :p.

    BTW I am on the road now but I will take the time to go over and respond to feedback once I get home. Work has been crazy! Thank you to everyone for taking the time to review. It's much appreciated!
     
    J011yroger likes this.
    #19
  20. TenFanLA

    TenFanLA Legend

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2011
    Messages:
    5,036
    I was in San Diego a few weeks ago and thought about contacting @sureshs to play.
    But the thought of even a 0.000001% chance of losing to him and the video being the most viewed video of all time on TTW stopped me.
     
    #20
  21. ptuanminh

    ptuanminh Professional

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2014
    Messages:
    868
    How can you not lose to somebody who hits 2 bounces?
     
    #21
  22. nytennisaddict

    nytennisaddict Legend

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2007
    Messages:
    8,459
    home court advantage - sureshian rules.
     
    #22
  23. nytennisaddict

    nytennisaddict Legend

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2007
    Messages:
    8,459
    honestly i'd love to play him and find out he's a former atp that's just been trolling us all this time.
    but it'd make me sad, if he's exactly who he paints himself to be on ttw.
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2018 at 8:37 AM
    TenFanLA and rogerroger917 like this.
    #23
  24. ChaelAZ

    ChaelAZ Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2014
    Messages:
    3,740
    Location:
    Arizona
    Good stuff and thanks for posting. Lots of good points above. I think the biggest thing that stuck out to me was you just seem very mechancial and stiff overall, with serves, strokes and movement. I think you'll feel more relaxed over time, but you can shadow swing and rotation movements to get a feel for fluid movements, then work to apply them in your game. Overall, if you keep building it the game will come.

    Cheers.
     
    CT-Topspin likes this.
    #24
  25. ptuanminh

    ptuanminh Professional

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2014
    Messages:
    868
    So if we can't have roger vs ttps grudge match, can we have topspin vs suresh???
     
    CT-Topspin likes this.
    #25
  26. rogerroger917

    rogerroger917 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2017
    Messages:
    1,718
    I'm down anytime to play ttps. Just to be clear. Not sure why ttps would complain about it when he keeps calling people names that won't post a video. Yet he won't play a real life match. With all his mental toughness talk.
     
    ptuanminh likes this.
    #26
  27. mad dog1

    mad dog1 Legend

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2010
    Messages:
    7,884
    Location:
    13 Elm St, Baker, CA 96666
    Just got to learn not to take ttps so literally.
     
    #27
  28. ChaelAZ

    ChaelAZ Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2014
    Messages:
    3,740
    Location:
    Arizona
    [​IMG]
     
    #28
  29. mad dog1

    mad dog1 Legend

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2010
    Messages:
    7,884
    Location:
    13 Elm St, Baker, CA 96666
    :D
     
    ChaelAZ likes this.
    #29
  30. rogerroger917

    rogerroger917 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2017
    Messages:
    1,718
    Oops.
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2018
    #30
  31. rogerroger917

    rogerroger917 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2017
    Messages:
    1,718
    Bah....[​IMG]
     
    ChaelAZ likes this.
    #31
  32. CT-Topspin

    CT-Topspin Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2017
    Messages:
    227
    Location:
    New England Region
    It took me a little longer than I would have liked to get back to this post. I've been swamped with work and was dealing with some burnout the past couple of days. I'm still recovering (could barely move out of bed yesterday) from playing the past eight days in a row. This is a recurring issue I have, that at the start of a week I have a ton of energy and come out of a lesson/drill/match feeling great so I decide to push the envelope until I am drained of every bit of energy I have. This leaks into my professional and social life and can cause issues. While I rest for the next few days, I'm going to work on mapping out a schedule that isn't too volume intensive and is repeatable over an extended time period. I'm planning on dialing the tennis to four days a week which is a reduction from the usual six. My intent is to fill these sessions with quality practice and to also not lose steam. I've been neglecting rest as part of my development for too long and have a serious intention to rectify this.

    I've taken your comments and broken them down into their appropriate elements of the game. From there each of the notes will have actionable items that I can pull from to work on with my coach or by myself. Any resources you guys can provide to further develop this list would be awesome! More specifically I am looking for solo drills as coaches can get costly and I can only afford to take a lesson once a week.

    I'll also post a weekly schedule with what I plan on doing, supplemental videos of drills/matches and a debrief every once in awhile to let you guys know how I'm doing.


    Serve

    "Racquet Drop"
    "Keeping Arm Loose"
    • Keeping Arm Loose Tip
    • Practice: Serve practice with hopper of balls in combination with racquet drop drill above
    Groundstrokes

    "Unit Turn"
    "Incorporating Legs into Swing"
    "Depth"
    Footwork

    "Drills"

    "Positioning for Correct Shot"
    Let me know what you guys think of this framework/system. I'm now going to work on my post for the week given these parameters and insert drills accordingly.

    Credit to @mad dog1, @FiReFTW, @J011yroger, @ptuanminh, @TimeToPlaySets, @ChaelAZ for the tips that helped me build this list!

     
    #32
  33. J011yroger

    J011yroger G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2007
    Messages:
    18,174
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    If time is on your side then you are better off increasing the volume of balls hit while lessening the physical toll.

    For example if you hit 700 balls at max effort 4 days per week and rest 4 days per week you would be better off hitting 1,000 balls per week at 50% effort 6 days per week and resting one.

    One way you end up tired and hurt and having hit 2,800 balls, the other way you end up feeling pretty good having hit 6,000 balls.

    After a year would you be a better player if you hit 140,000 balls on the brink of injury and exhaustion or 300,000 balls rested and in good health.

    J
     
    nytennisaddict likes this.
    #33
  34. CT-Topspin

    CT-Topspin Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2017
    Messages:
    227
    Location:
    New England Region
    Appreciate the advice and I agree wholeheartedly, although it's something that's absolutely easier said than done for me. I think this comes down to playing more matches (singles) vs. drills where I have direct control over the intensity. The other variable at work here is time. It's more time spent on the court and traveling to matches which reduces the time I have to keep everything else steady in my life. Mentally it causes stress, throws me off rhythm, causes frustration in practice which inevitably hinders my development. I have a lot of time lost driving up to courts that are an hour away (two hours of travel minimum) which is a HUGE chunk of my life which I'm realizing is starting to hinder other things I'd like to do, rest being one of them.

    I'm thinking about attacking this problem two-fold:

    1.) For the moment, focus more on drills than match play. I'd say about a 3 days drill/1 day match ratio for the moment. This will allow me to really groove into appropriate patterns which I can then work on in matches. For me this means cutting back on weekend tournaments and league play until I feel it's appropriate to ramp this up. This also gives me control over my repetitions and intensity. I've got nice courts five minutes from where I live as well so this fits nicely into my schedule.

    2.) Stop playing so far away! This might mean making difficult decisions on cutting where I go to play tennis and moving towards clubs that are closer to where I live in order to fit these things in my schedule.
     
    #34
  35. J011yroger

    J011yroger G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2007
    Messages:
    18,174
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    Obviously we are at different points in our development but I can tell you that two years ago I played 29 matches in June and 25 in July and I was absolutely miserable. It felt like all I did was drive an hour play a match, drive an hour home and go to sleep. I was burnt out, exhausted, had no time to practice.

    Last year I cut back on matches maybe 20% added in foam rolling and other recovery routines, had a great, great year, but still ended up worn down and battling injuries.

    This year I have cut back even more on matches, have gotten more coaching, have become more specific with my practices, practice more frequently, practice with less physicality but with more focus. I'm having my best year ever, feel great, and actually am excited to play matches as opposed to seeing them as a chore.

    J
     
    CT-Topspin likes this.
    #35
  36. J011yroger

    J011yroger G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2007
    Messages:
    18,174
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    Also this might be a personal thing for me but I can put out tremendous effort but I absolutely must get a lot of sleep. So shaping my schedule to allow me to sleep has been huge, if I have a late match I make sure I can get to bed early the next night.

    J
     
    #36
  37. BulldogLouisiana

    BulldogLouisiana New User

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2014
    Messages:
    44
    Got a 12# yesterday. Thanks for the advice.
     
    J011yroger and CT-Topspin like this.
    #37
  38. CT-Topspin

    CT-Topspin Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2017
    Messages:
    227
    Location:
    New England Region
    I think I am going through these same progressions. There's a ton of trial and error associated with trying to manage your workload and life as it's very individual although I believe there are universal rules to discover, especially through conversation on these boards.

    What types of recovery routines do you follow?

    What is your current match to practice ratio?

    I agree with the note on sleep. I absolutely NEED at least 8 hours in order to perform optimally at work and then tennis. I am definitely not one of those people that adjusts well to a diminished sleep schedule.
     
    #38
  39. J011yroger

    J011yroger G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2007
    Messages:
    18,174
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    I stretch, foam roll, ice, massage, as needed though I should be more diligent.

    I would say I'm around 60% practice, 15% practice matches, 25% real matches? It varies throughout the year as court time and seasons dictate.

    J
     
    CT-Topspin likes this.
    #39
  40. J011yroger

    J011yroger G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2007
    Messages:
    18,174
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    I'm also aware of what I have to do so I know if I have a monster week coming up then I'll prepare for it and plan to have an easy week after.

    J
     
    #40
  41. CT-Topspin

    CT-Topspin Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2017
    Messages:
    227
    Location:
    New England Region
    For sure-- planning is key. I've got schedules and spreadsheets all over the place that have become moot because I haven't had the time to sit down and update and analyze them. That's on my to do list for today. Once I have that and a decent look-ahead I'll be able to plan my training appropriately. I'll make sure to create enough buffer between my activities so that I have time to actually make those calls!
     
    #41
  42. FiReFTW

    FiReFTW Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2016
    Messages:
    3,176
    How the hell did you not injure yourself out of sheer overplaying? Pro players don't play NEARLY this amount of matches and it sounds inhumane. Basically a match every single day.
     
    #42
  43. CT-Topspin

    CT-Topspin Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2017
    Messages:
    227
    Location:
    New England Region
    I can't speak to that level of output but I've gotten pretty close and from my own experience if you're in good shape and maintain a good diet it's not impossible (especially if you throw in a bunch of anti-inflammatories.)

    It takes a toll. The obvious consequence is the physical breakdown. Your muscles don't respond the same way as when fresh and it seems like there's a disconnect between what your brain knows what to do and how your body actually executes. Mentally you're always exhausted, can't think straight and are prone to mild depression. It differs from person to person but the further you push yourself the worse these things get. It can really cause a nasty downward spiral and make you want to quit the sport altogether.

    This runs contrary to the "no days off" or "grind" mentality that gets echoed in all of those youtube motivational videos. Tennis has so many periods of rest integrated into the sport that it's very easy to put a lot more stress on the body than the guy that goes to the gym, reps to failure, and then obviously knows to rest the next day. You can still play tennis at a sub-obtimal level. Your execution isn't as recordable as when lifting weights so you can get by playing for a long time at a sub-optimal level.
     
    #43
  44. J011yroger

    J011yroger G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2007
    Messages:
    18,174
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    A lot of it is mental toll and the driving time. It wasn't fun, I would not recommend. You would be stunned at the sheer number of matches some of these USTA nutjobs play, people on 20 teams and so forth.

    J
     
    #44
  45. TimeToPlaySets

    TimeToPlaySets Legend

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2012
    Messages:
    5,107
    I played almost 50 days in a row last summer.
    No injury.
    Your body will adapt once you make more demands on it.
    And I'm twice your age.

    Also, matches are the easiest form of hitting.
    Tons of time between each point to pick up balls.

    In drilling you will hit 10 times more balls per hour.
    Yesterday I rallied for an hour straight and was exhausted.
    It felt like I just played Four matches.
    I can play 2 sets and barely break a sweat.
     
    #45
  46. TimeToPlaySets

    TimeToPlaySets Legend

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2012
    Messages:
    5,107
    HUUUGE credit to CT for playing 8 days in a row.
    That is exactly what you need to do to make new drills stick.

    Driving an hour to a court is insanity.
    Isn't there a local high school near you?
    do you live on a remote rural Farm?
     
    #46
  47. CT-Topspin

    CT-Topspin Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2017
    Messages:
    227
    Location:
    New England Region
    I've been playing around with my schedule for this week and here's what I have so far for what I consider to be a low intensity, high volume work week. The focus this week should be on serve (have been inconsistent with it lately and would like to develop good habits) and continuing to develop the footwork and unit turn.

    There is less emphasis on ground strokes and match play as I am trying to lay the foundation first before I dig into the details of my groundstrokes. The intention is to get some videos up throughout the week and debrief to let you guys know how it all goes.

    Sunday 7/22 is the final league match for our 3.0 team. If we win we're on to Districts (awesome!) so I have built in a solid amount of rest after my Saturday morning lesson right up until the Sunday match. I'll adjust the intensity of Saturday depending on how I feel.

    Let me know how this looks to you guys!

    7/16 - 7/21


    Monday

    - 1/2 Hour of Serve Practice, focus is on racquet drop, loose hand, fluidity
    - 1/2 Hour of Medicine Ball workout

    Tuesday

    - Lesson with Tennis Pro
    - Focus will be on Unit Turn and Footwork
    - Hour and a Half

    Wednesday

    - Hitting Practice with Company team (1 hour)
    - Focus on applying principles of unit turn and footwork from day before

    Thursday

    - Footwork Drills with ladders and cones on a tennis court
    - 1/2 Hour of Medicine Ball Workout

    Friday

    - Rest. Happy Hour, Video Games, take it easy for intense practice next day

    Saturday

    - Lesson with ATP Pro (Pro's Choice of Workout)
    - Potentially may throw in a session with Ball Machine or Singles Match if feeling good

     
    #47
  48. CT-Topspin

    CT-Topspin Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2017
    Messages:
    227
    Location:
    New England Region
    I happen to like the program the people run. Unfortunately making that drive 3-4 times a week is unrealistic. I'll probably stick to weekend trips. They have a couple of ATP pro coaches up there that have been awesome for helping my game.

    I do have courts everywhere around me, though. I'll be utilizing those more frequently.

    You're also a machine, TTPS. My body has definitely not adjusted to long streaks and it actually gets worse the harder I push. It gets to a point where I don't do anything except drag through work, limp onto a tennis court and then come home and pass out. That's with me being a fit 25 year old who practices good diet and supplementation. :p
     
    #48
  49. TimeToPlaySets

    TimeToPlaySets Legend

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2012
    Messages:
    5,107
    I have averaged 4-5x a week for over a year straight.
    I am only now starting to feel the effects.
    My recovery has become slower. I can take a day off, and still my legs are sore.
    I think once a year, you need 2 weeks off.
    I have decided to tour the national parks for 2 weeks and will resume August 1st.
     
    #49
  50. TimeToPlaySets

    TimeToPlaySets Legend

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2012
    Messages:
    5,107
    You are doing the right thing.
    Frequency + Game Plan = Success
    My entire game has transformed in a year.
    Sometimes, I can't even believe it's still me.

    But, you MUST MUST MUST make this more convenient, or you will burn out.
    One hour drive after work is ridic.
    Find local players. PAY local players.
    This is priority #1.
    2 hours of driving means tennis is eating your entire life. Bad!
     
    #50

Share This Page