Custom Made Shoes, How Much Would You Pay?

#1
The customer places their feet on a platter and lasers map the entirety of their feet. Size, shape, arch, etc. Then, the customer chooses the model of shoe that they want, the colorway and the desired outsole. The computer sends the foot mapping data to another machine and the pieces to the selected shoes are cut from the desired material. They would probably be assembled by the combination of machine and hand the same as they are now.

The shoes would fit like gloves. They would even taking into consideration the top of the foot and eliminate the foot from sliding forward. The insole would also be custom so there would be, much less, or any no need for custom orthotics at all.

If the technology does not exist now, it should in the future. I don't know for a fact, but I have long assumed that the top athletes fit their shoes this way for a while now.

If this service was available from all shoe manufacturers, how much would you be willing to pay for custom made shoes?
 
#5
...

If the technology does not exist now, it should in the future. I don't know for a fact, but I have long assumed that the top athletes fit their shoes this way for a while now. ...
A lot of pros are using standard shoes with custom insoles. Thiem posted a video this winter of being fitted for custom insoles. His foot was both scanned and he stepped in material to make a mold of the bottom of his feet.

Roger Federer is commonly cited by those who own his shoes (he sells them for charity) as a player using custom lasted shoes. He has very wide feet without a very wide toe spread according to reports. Those of us with wide feet can understand the potential performance advantage to a custom lasted shoe.
 

Tennis_Hands

Talk Tennis Guru
#7
That might be a little optimistic in that there are so many shoes out there now with a higher price tag in their mass produced form.
Yes, but if I am getting MTB and road cycling shoes custom moulded on my feet for $380-550 and they literally last for a decade, I don't think that anyone can convince me that something that will last half a year at best costs more than $150.

I don't buy normal tennis shoes at full price either, so that is not relevant to my estimate what shoes should cost, but I agree with what you are saying. If the people are ready to pay for the service, why not.

:cool:
 
#8
Happily pay $200. The lack of quality truly wide shoes is my bane. Look at the thread on 4E shoes. I am reduced to playing in Nike Monarchs.
 
#9
Happily pay $200. The lack of quality truly wide shoes is my bane. Look at the thread on 4E shoes. I am reduced to playing in Nike Monarchs.
I think that is a more reasonable amount to expect to pay. People with foot and/or knee, ankle, back issues I believe would pay well north of that even.
 

Tennis_Hands

Talk Tennis Guru
#14
What an awesome world that would be! Perfect shoes!

Right at this moment I would happily pay $299
Everyone says that until someone puts his hand in the fire, produces the custom option, and then everyone somehow won't put their money where their mouth is.

I have seen it literally tens of times just with such consumer goods.

:cool:
 
#15
The customer places their feet on a platter and lasers map the entirety of their feet. Size, shape, arch, etc. Then, the customer chooses the model of shoe that they want, the colorway and the desired outsole. The computer sends the foot mapping data to another machine and the pieces to the selected shoes are cut from the desired material. They would probably be assembled by the combination of machine and hand the same as they are now.

The shoes would fit like gloves. They would even taking into consideration the top of the foot and eliminate the foot from sliding forward. The insole would also be custom so there would be, much less, or any no need for custom orthotics at all.

If the technology does not exist now, it should in the future. I don't know for a fact, but I have long assumed that the top athletes fit their shoes this way for a while now.

If this service was available from all shoe manufacturers, how much would you be willing to pay for custom made shoes?

I copied your post to underscore what you are asking. You asked if the service was available from all shoe manufacturers, how much would you be willing to pay for custom made shoes?

I agree with Tennis Hands. $150

Now if you asked what did I think they would cost, sure, $300, maybe $250. I wouldn't pay that tho.
If they were available for $150, I would try them. I'd have to get at least 2 pair a year, probably 3.
So I would not pay $750-$900 per year for shoes.
I might/probably would pay $450 a year for shoes, since I probably pay $240-$300 a year now for non-customs.
 
#16
Everyone says that until someone puts his hand in the fire, produces the custom option, and then everyone somehow won't put their money where their mouth is.

I have seen it literally tens of times just with such consumer goods.

:cool:
Of course a lot of people wouldn't follow through with what they say, but custom shoes would really be a game-changer. For the novelty of it I would most certainly pay that much for a pair. Would I continue to buy more? Probably not. Custom shoes would only be profitable I think if they could the price down to only $30-$50 more than a normal pair. Good luck with that.

:cool:
 
#17
Everyone says that until someone puts his hand in the fire, produces the custom option, and then everyone somehow won't put their money where their mouth is.

I have seen it literally tens of times just with such consumer goods.

:cool:
Just like expensive gut strings. A lot of people will get them once just to see if the hype is real, but unless gut were to cost $20 a set, most people don't continue buying.
 

Tennis_Hands

Talk Tennis Guru
#18
Of course a lot of people wouldn't follow through with what they say, but custom shoes would really be a game-changer. For the novelty of it I would most certainly pay that much for a pair. Would I continue to buy more? Probably not. Custom shoes would only be profitable I think if they could the price down to only $30-$50 more than a normal pair. Good luck with that

:cool:
My experience is that only very few people really need custom tennis shoes.

There is always something that is at least a compromise, if not a perfect fit, and sports shoes (especially tennis, running shoes etc) really cannot benefit hugely from being custom, unlike for example dress shoes, riding boots, or special activities sports shoes like ski-boots with moulded inner piece or high-performance cycling shoes.

They would be nice, but the benefits from them are dwarfed by the expense that a custom shoe requires, especially in what is essentially an exposable item.

I would pay for a custom tennis shoe that can be resoled, but such a thing doesn't currently exist, and it would also need to have its cushioning exchanged for new when resoled.

Still, the question with the prices is interesting. The companies operate with huge margins, unequivocally proven by their 6 months warranties. They make money off of every pair that they sell, even when they have to deliver it twice for the same price. It indicates that custom option is very reasonable at the price of a top end shoe (maybe minus such durability warranty).

:cool:
 

Tennis_Hands

Talk Tennis Guru
#19
Just like expensive gut strings. A lot of people will get them once just to see if the hype is real, but unless gut were to cost $20 a set, most people don't continue buying.
The gut strings example is relevant insofar that there are cheap polys etc that cost really a fraction of the price of an expensive gut.

However, if you go to the higher end, and depending on your needs, an expensive gut can be practically almost the same price as an expensive other setup, due to increased durability.

:cool:
 
#20
Everyone says that until someone puts his hand in the fire, produces the custom option, and then everyone somehow won't put their money where their mouth is.

I have seen it literally tens of times just with such consumer goods.

:cool:
I hear what you are saying. Shoes could be different though. There are so many players that have knee, foot, hip, back, and other pain that can be alleviated with better fitting shoes.

Waaaay back in the day, players paid $30-50 for wooden racquets and would have laughed at the idea of paying $200 for a frame. Today, $200+ frames are flying off shelves with every new edition. I think that once, a fair number of players felt the fit of custom shoes, they would never go back.
 

kimguroo

Hall of Fame
#21
$300 might be reasonable since NikeID was $200 for tennis shoes but for $300, the shoes needs to have some unique technology which have replaceable outsole. Replaceable outsole should cost between $30-50.
I am willing to pay $300 for custom shoes if Custom shoes has features like 3d scan of foot, fits like a glove, replaceable outsole, unique technology on midsole (especially materials such as Air or other innovative system) and good insole.
Too good to be true hahaha.
 
#22
$300 might be reasonable since NikeID was $200 for tennis shoes but for $300, the shoes needs to have some unique technology which have replaceable outsole. Replaceable outsole should cost between $30-50.
I am willing to pay $300 for custom shoes if Custom shoes has features like 3d scan of foot, fits like a glove, replaceable outsole, unique technology on midsole (especially materials such as Air or other innovative system) and good insole.
Too good to be true hahaha.
I agree with that price point, and up from there depending. Factoring in the outsole option of a very durable long-lasting compound or one that is softer and even more comfortable.
 
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