Customer issue ?

BigT

Professional
As a home stringer, I strung a poly hybrid for a first-time customer who was complaining of breaking too often. He never tried polys before. A day later, he said he didn't like the tension,said it was too loose, although I strung it at the tension he wanted, and that it was giving him too much vibe.
What would you do in a situation like that? I don't feel I should restring for free, as I did nothing wrong and did what he wanted.
any suggestions?
 
It's totally your decision. This is more of a business question. Is this customer someone that will keep coming back to you and if so, will he be trying to take advantage of you? Can this customer potentially bring you more business? If so than I could see you bending a little if it is bound to bring you more business. You wouldn't be in the wrong if you denied to him. I think you could meet in the middle and tell him if he pays for the new strings that you'll re-string it for him/her. Be sure to explain to him/her that unless the string/stringing is defective that the job is non-refundable.
Also, if you are looking to create a serious business out of stringing, it may be in your best interest to investigate the situation; find out how many hours he's hitting before it brakes, find out where the string is breaking. Suggest that s/he make adjustments, ONE AT A TIME, until s/he is has settled on the right set-up. Take notes during the process and refer to them not only for this particular job, but in case you might need some reference point on any other job you mught do. This creates a trusting relationship between you and the client and will no doubt bring you repeat and referral business. If you're looking out for your clients thay'll want to respect you and your efforts and will keep coming back.
 

jazar

Professional
i would tell him that its not your fault he doesnt like the tension he asked for and that if he finds he's getting too much vibration to put a dampener in
 

smarion2

Rookie
if one of my customers is unhappy with a new type of strings they wanted to try i'll always redo it for free as long as they pay for the cost of the strings. I want my customers to know that I want them to be happy with the racquet they play with. If it doesn't cost you anything its no big deal unless your swamped and doing 20 racquets a day.
 

Bud

Bionic Poster
if one of my customers is unhappy with a new type of strings they wanted to try i'll always redo it for free as long as they pay for the cost of the strings. I want my customers to know that I want them to be happy with the racquet they play with. If it doesn't cost you anything its no big deal unless your swamped and doing 20 racquets a day.
Wow, you're beneficent :)
 

Bud

Bionic Poster
shwetty[tennis]balls;2568045 said:
It's totally your decision. This is more of a business question. Is this customer someone that will keep coming back to you and if so, will he be trying to take advantage of you? Can this customer potentially bring you more business? If so than I could see you bending a little if it is bound to bring you more business. You wouldn't be in the wrong if you denied to him. I think you could meet in the middle and tell him if he pays for the new strings that you'll re-string it for him/her. Be sure to explain to him/her that unless the string/stringing is defective that the job is non-refundable.
Also, if you are looking to create a serious business out of stringing, it may be in your best interest to investigate the situation; find out how many hours he's hitting before it brakes, find out where the string is breaking. Suggest that s/he make adjustments, ONE AT A TIME, until s/he is has settled on the right set-up. Take notes during the process and refer to them not only for this particular job, but in case you might need some reference point on any other job you mught do. This creates a trusting relationship between you and the client and will no doubt bring you repeat and referral business. If you're looking out for your clients thay'll want to respect you and your efforts and will keep coming back.
Agreed. Good advice, IMO.
 

diredesire

Adjunct Moderator
Yep, it's really your call! How much profit are you making per job? Is this money feeding your family or you? If it's just a side thing, you may want to let it slide and restring at no charge/string charge. If you are making a rather drastic change (string material/type, etc) you should be aware that there are "rule of thumb" adjustments to be made, especially if the player is picky. Polys do lose tension quickly, even new age copolys (some will disagree, but I've cut out jobs that are only weeks old with little to no "snap").

Also, you are definitely going to introduce vibration, simply because the string is stiffer! You should have warned him of the differences and dangers of stringing with a different string. If it were me, I'd chalk it up to experience and restring no charge. For me, Stringing isn't a primary job or anything, and even if you charge only $5-10 labor, you're still coming out ahead in the long run.

Edit: Also, what strings did you put in? What was he using bfeore?
 

BigGriff

Semi-Pro
^^^ very good advice! I would add that it is imperative to educate your customers and have them provide some information on their current racquet setup, playing style, and level. Obtaining and providing information to your customers may prevent this from happening in the future.
 

BigT

Professional
the guy uses a wilson triad 3.2- huge head size, very open pattern.
he said he was going through 2 a month with PSG 16@55. I told him thats not bad, but he insisted on something that lasts longer. I normally wouldn't think of giving a guy at this level a poly, but since he insisted, I figured Polylon Sp 17 is a softer copoly, so I strung it at 52 lbs and crossed it with PSG @55.

maybe a longer lasting synthetic? although PSG 16 is good IMO.
 
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