Customizers: Asymmetric weights ?

#1
When it happened the first time, I thought it was a glitch, but I now ran into this the second time -- asymmetric weighting. In both cases, pro stock racquets. Both have more lead on one side of the racquet than the other. One was ~4 years ago, one just now. Both legitimate pro-stocks.

Is there a purpose to this?

I cannot believe the pro-stock customizer was sloppy and forgot to put extra weight on the other side.
Is there any method to measure which side requires more weight?

The weight is under the grommet. Once I string it, I will not be able to go back. I am trying to determine if I should remove it / balance evenly across sides or if there is indeed a theory behind this, or if the customizer was trying to compensate for some defect in the frame...

Thanks,
-- Nick
 
#3
In theory, the original owner must have been hitting below the sweet spot (horizontal axis if racquet is held tip up/handle down 3 is LHS and 9 is RHS) or used an extreme low to high swing. Miss hits would be more stable by having the lead on the side of the miss hit (lower side) which you can always find either with a mark on the frame or a twirl. You don't need symmetric lead placement at 3 and 9 if you hit mainly towards the 3 side (right handed.) You can get the stability needed without having to lead up both sides. I would just remove the lead before stringing and re add as needed.
 

zalive

Hall of Fame
#4
In theory, the original owner must have been hitting below the sweet spot (horizontal axis if racquet is held tip up/handle down 3 is LHS and 9 is RHS) or used an extreme low to high swing. Miss hits would be more stable by having the lead on the side of the miss hit (lower side) which you can always find either with a mark on the frame or a twirl. You don't need symmetric lead placement at 3 and 9 if you hit mainly towards the 3 side (right handed.) You can get the stability needed without having to lead up both sides. I would just remove the lead before stringing and re add as needed.
Hmm...from rotational inertia's (twist weight) perspective it's all the same which side has the lead, both sides should twist equally on mishits. However it's not the same for the sweet spot, side with more lead on will have it wider, will have more power and be more forgiving on mishits because if this.
 
#5
Yup; that is what I said....:p

The lead does enlarge the sweet spot of the frame towards itself. Twist Weight is unaffected whether it is evenly distributed or all on one side. I think I saw this once on a frame where the player played with a full Western/Hawaiian. Of course with the Proportional String Thread going somewhat full bore, maybe it does not make any difference.

And to re answer the OP question - I would remove the lead.
 

zalive

Hall of Fame
#6
I'm sorry esgee, and it's not the first time when reading the board late in the night that I misunderstand what someone wrote :D

Sent from my Lenovo P70-A using Tapatalk
 
#8
Seems totally crazy to me - on strokes could be ok given you hold it same side all the time... but for serving, volleying and blocking seems like it would introduce inconsistency in string bed response.
 
#9
I made it symmetric. Racquet feels perfectly alright now.

Long time ago, I played with the racquet that had asymmetric weights. I was struck as to how unpredictable the response was. It was sending the ball everywhere except where I imagined it should go. On normal straight strokes, the height over the net was totally surprising, and not at all what I was accustomed to. I suspect this is what people here refer to as the "launch angle". Except that it was a dense 18x20 racquet, so there should not have been any "angle".
 
#10
Hi Nick, asymmetric weight customization exists, I am aware of at least 2 famous pro customizers who do it on purpose, rarely I may do it too, and not because of being sloppy. There are few pro players who have tested it, and even fewer who liked it.
 
A

Attila_the_gorilla

Guest
#11
Hi Nick, asymmetric weight customization exists, I am aware of at least 2 famous pro customizers who do it on purpose, rarely I may do it too, and not because of being sloppy. There are few pro players who have tested it, and even fewer who liked it.
What's the reasoning behind it?
 
A

Attila_the_gorilla

Guest
#13
I can easily imagine a scenario where the stock retai racket already has asymmetrical weighting due to manufacturing tolerances. For example a bit more weight went in around 3 than 9. So you may want to equalize that out by adding your own asymmetrical weights to compensate.

It would of course be almost impossible to test for these manufacturing defects.
 
#15
my thermodynamics prof at university who himself is an avid tennis player once let me and a buddy take measurements of our rackets in the lab with high-tech sensoric equipment and stuff; was around 2008 and I was playing a bunch of k six one 95 retail rackets. I'll try to dig up my old laptop, might even find the data we assembled back then. the weight distribution differences along the hoop were absolutely shocking though.

wouldn't be surprised if assymetrical lead taping is done to counter wilsons non-existent QC in some cases.
 
#16
I can easily imagine a scenario where the stock retai racket already has asymmetrical weighting due to manufacturing tolerances. For example a bit more weight went in around 3 than 9. So you may want to equalize that out by adding your own asymmetrical weights to compensate.

It would of course be almost impossible to test for these manufacturing defects.
I was talking about a racquet design issue, not manufacturing tolerance, and achieving a specific racquet playing outcome.
 
A

Attila_the_gorilla

Guest
#17
I was talking about a racquet design issue, not manufacturing tolerance, and achieving a specific racquet playing outcome.
Yeah I understood, just don't quite see the point of it, so I mentioned a different possibility.
 
#18
Jimmy Connors used to weight one side of his T-2000. He always kept the weight the same way but I don't remember if that was up or down. Watching on TV there are several pros that keep the same side up all the time (for whatever reason.)
 
#19
Some players do consistently use the same side of a racquet after all, even if I cannot see the point myself of doing such a customization job regardless.
I string for a guy who only hits with one side of his racquet. The bottom edge of the hitting side is visibly and well-worn from scraping the ground. The other side pristine.
 
#20
Do you mean like how Feli Lopez has his lead in this pic? Where one piece is on 9 at one side and other is on 3 but on the opposite side of strings?


Or do you mean lead at 3 and 9 on just one side of strings...sorry im a little confused...
 
#21
Different amounts of lead are distributed around the edge of the frame. The lead is NOT symmetrically placed, e.g. 6 grams at 3 and 2 grams at 9. 3¢
 
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