Cutting the knot

#1
Hi guys.

How close to the knot should you cut?

5mm?

If you cut too short can the loose end slip through the knot during play.

Do multifilaments have to be cut longer because they're more likely to slip?

Any help greatly appreciated.

Cheers, Paul
 
#2
Depends on the knot you're using. If you tie it properly then you'll remove the risk.

Use a single half hitch (never recommended), and you'll need a longer tail; other wise it will slip and you'll lose the knot.

Tie a double half hitch properly and 5mm should be fine.

Tie a Parnell or Pro, and you can cut a bit closer as the string won't slip through.

Side note; have you been on a stringing course??

Regards

Paul
 
#3
Hi guys.

How close to the knot should you cut?

5mm?

If you cut too short can the loose end slip through the knot during play.

Do multifilaments have to be cut longer because they're more likely to slip?

Any help greatly appreciated.

Cheers, Paul
Hi Paul, I haven’t seen a loose end slip through when tied off, regardless of the type of string.

The length you leave doesn’t really matter, but the way you pull the knot and tie-off does (from an aesthetics standpoint). This is my preference: when you have cut the end, it should rest up against the inside of the frame, and away from the string bed.

This is achieved by pulling the knot perpendicular to the outside of the frame, and cutting the string almost parallel to the inside of the frame so the tail is neatly pointing out of the way of the string bed and resting up against the frame.


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#5
Although you may be a bit leery of knots slipping on you, be careful not to pull too hard when you snug them up (before cutting off the extra). That's a great way to snap the string and spoil the whole job right when you're doing the finishing touches. Yes, as a matter of fact, I have done this... but not more than twice.

When in doubt leave just a little extra I say. Every now and then you'll deal with a crazy-slippery string that might be more prone to slipping, even with a proper knot. Spiraltek from Babolat is a current string that seems insanely slick. The last time I installed some of this stuff for a pal's client, I didn't trust my knots, so I put a tiny bit of clear nail polish on them for peace of mind.

Even if you leave a little extra length when you snip the knot, it's not a big deal to trim that tail slightly shorter (without overdoing it) using perhaps a nail clipper. I occasionally like using a nail clipper for when I've cut the extra after knotting some poly, but I've left a sharp point or barb sticking out too much. A nail clipper is great or taking off that tiny corner and blunting the end of that string without taking it right down to the knot itself.
 
#6
Don't tie the double half hitch. That's the only one I've ever seen work loose, and only with synthetic gut type strings that I recall. I always use Parnell knots now and I cut the string as close as I can get without hitting the frame with the cutters. Never had one of those knots come loose.
 
#8
Also, make sure to release the clamp before cutting the knot. If the tail is going to withdraw a bit, it's most likely to happen when releasing the clamp.
A better method is to release the base, not the clamp, while holding the knot, in particular the 1st part of a knot (especially the Prnell, Pro or DHH). This will cause the string to stay with the clamp when drawback occurs. If you release the clamp, when the string drawsback it increases the chances that the string will be scuffed and damaged by the teeth of the clamp. Releasing the base first will remove this risk, especially important when dealing with more fragile string.

Nice to see that all previous post other than mine was liked by the OP. :unsure:

I'm off to run the 3rd stringing course this week.

Regards

Paul
 
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