Dear BreakPoint,

Kenny022593

Professional
Dear BreakPoint,

I am a 21 year old college player and have been playing since I was a freshman in high school. Throughout my college career I have acquired multiple injuries and have played majority doubles due to this. I am currently trying to revamp my game in order to try and work myself into the singles line up.

Over the years I have gone on court and freestyled how I played with the excuse that I play worse when I follow a specific game plan. I would very much like to change this.

I am calling you out because I know you are an advocate of classic play and point construction and would like to propose two question. What are some basic patterns that every player should have in their arsenal? and Is a basic pattern something that should be practiced in order to repeat it multiple times a point or should it lead to a finisher?

Thank you,
Kenny022593
 

President

Legend
Has BreakPoint ever posted in this section? I've never seen him around here, he is always either in the Racquets section or Pro Player Gear section.
 

Kenny022593

Professional
Not sure. I am not active on these boards like I used to be. I do know that the moderators would move the thread over here anyways, so might as well save them the trouble.

The wording of the thread was joking because of his gripes with the current state of tennis, but they are serious questions.
 

Maximagq

Banned
Has BreakPoint ever posted in this section? I've never seen him around here, he is always either in the Racquets section or Pro Player Gear section.
He posted once on an andrehanderson thread but he isn't a regular here since he didn't know who Matt Lin was. I would message him via email, or have another classical player give tips.
 

Maximagq

Banned
Dear BreakPoint,

I am a 21 year old college player and have been playing since I was a freshman in high school. Throughout my college career I have acquired multiple injuries and have played majority doubles due to this. I am currently trying to revamp my game in order to try and work myself into the singles line up.

Over the years I have gone on court and freestyled how I played with the excuse that I play worse when I follow a specific game plan. I would very much like to change this.

I am calling you out because I know you are an advocate of classic play and point construction and would like to propose two question. What are some basic patterns that every player should have in their arsenal? and Is a basic pattern something that should be practiced in order to repeat it multiple times a point or should it lead to a finisher?

Thank you,
Kenny022593
I'm not a classical player but if I were I would ay come in on anything short first of all. Anything service line or shorter is the green light to come in. Use slice approaches down the line and serve up the T to minimize angles that your opponent could pass you. Cover the line you hit to and make your opponent react.
 

user92626

G.O.A.T.
It's never clear to me that Surehs was being genuine with his tips or he was mocking the whole point of Internet tip giving. :)
 

BreakPoint

Bionic Poster
I am calling you out because I know you are an advocate of classic play and point construction and would like to propose two question. What are some basic patterns that every player should have in their arsenal? and Is a basic pattern something that should be practiced in order to repeat it multiple times a point or should it lead to a finisher?
Here are a few you can try:

1. Assuming you're righty, once in a while hit a heavy slice serve in the deuce court which pulls your opponent off to the side of the court and forces them to return down-the-line 90% of the time. You come into the net covering the DTL return and put the easy backhand volley into the wide open court. :)

2. Once in a while, chip and charge off of a second serve to keep your opponent off-balance and not knowing what to expect. He may panic and make a error.

3. Slice a few backhands crosscourt and deep but on the 3rd or 4th one slice it really short on purpose. Since the mechanics of slicing deep or short look the same, it's a great way to disguise a drop shot and your opponent will probably be surprised by the short ball.

4. On approach shots, you want to mix things up. Hit some deep down-the line and cover the crosscourt pass, but sometimes hit the approach shot short on purpose which forces your opponent to move forward and have to hit the ball up to get it over the net. But you'll already be at the net to cut off the volley when he pops it up.

5. The old drop shot and lob combo. If your opponent is not in the best shape or if he has a weak overhead, even if he gets to the drop shots he'll soon tire out if you do it enough times. And once he's tired, his game will likely start dropping off.

Hope this helps. :)
 
Top