Deiton Baughman

Rob_C

Hall of Fame
I think its time a thread was made for him here. He's not a jr anymore, so we can discuss him, plus, as far as I know, his dad doesnt post here anymore, not sure if he's back lurking or not.

Anyway, DB is up to 411 in the rankings now. He just lost in the last rd of qualies in Aptos. He did take out the #2 seed in qualies, Frederik Nielsen, #211, pretty easily, 1 & 2.

Here's a link to his qualies match in Aptos. Looks like he cleaned up his service motion a bit.

http://livestream.com/ATP/aptos2015court1
 
I guess it's strictly because his dad used to post here but I've never understood why this guy is so popular and important to this forum.
 

onehandbh

Legend
i think he will eventually get to the top 100. Looks like he's been making steady progress and working his way up the rankings.
 

Rob_C

Hall of Fame
Well, there are threads about Tiafoe and Kozlov here as well. Figured theyre all in the same boat.
 

Rob_C

Hall of Fame
I guess it's strictly because his dad used to post here but I've never understood why this guy is so popular and important to this forum.
I wouldnt say popular, or important. However, he is sort of a TT 'local', so to speak. Furthermore, when guys like Peliwo or Jason Jung post threads, people go crazy. Right now, he's ranked about 100 spots better than Peliwo.

There's a thread about Tommy Paul, and I dont have a problem with it, TP was on track to go to college till he blew up this Spring, but theyre both ranked about the same right now, in the low to mid 400s.
 

andfor

Legend
I was scolded a few months ago for brining up DB. Wish I could find that post or remember who took issue with it.
 

mikej

Hall of Fame
cool anomalous statistic
Haas continues to get his WCs, however, and is in the main draw of the US Open

career prize money < $25,000 vs > $13 million
i like that statistic also
 

MarTennis

Semi-Pro
I lurked for many years while people hammered DB's dad. Dad gave as much as he took, but considering the work that was getting done in the background, it is wonder he bothered with much of the invective.
 

Rob_C

Hall of Fame
1 more win by each of them and we'll have a nice rematch, and progress check as to how their development is going. I'd like to see both of them go up against Rubin as well, just to see who would prevail.

On another note, DB is currently ranked ahead of Carlos Boluda Purkiss, who was the #1 jr in the 14s I believe, and against whom he was compared to alot by his dad and TCF.
 

mad dog1

G.O.A.T.
How did it go?

I think DB will win the finals in straight sets against MM.
wasn't close. MM won 2 and 2.

Matt and I plan to be there tomorrow to watch the final.

the thing about futures is anyone can beat anyone on any given day. hope it's a good match.
 

mad dog1

G.O.A.T.
How did it go?

I think DB will win the finals in straight sets against MM.
officiating was pretty bad w/ lots of blown calls.

MM took the first set 6-1. DB took the next 2 sets 4 and 3. it was a shame that the match ended on a blown call. MM hit a deep ball that clearly landed on the baseline but it was called long on match point. Matt, my wife and I were sitting right behind the baseline and we all saw the ball as good.

MM has definitely improved from last year. this is the first time i've seen DB play.
 

Rob_C

Hall of Fame
Looks like DB really benefited from all that ducking the competition in Europe on clay this Spring.
 

JW10S

Hall of Fame
Looks like DB really benefited from all that ducking the competition in Europe on clay this Spring.
Part of the reason a player turns pro is to travel the world playing tennis. I'd rather go to Europe, or anywhere, than Bumblef#ck USA to play a Futures. Ducking the competition my ***..so how did the 'competition' do this week?
 

atatu

Legend
Part of the reason a player turns pro is to travel the world playing tennis. I'd rather go to Europe, or anywhere, than Bumblef#ck USA to play a Futures. Ducking the competition my ***..so how did the 'competition' do this week?
You need to read the whole thread...
 

Rob_C

Hall of Fame
Part of the reason a player turns pro is to travel the world playing tennis. I'd rather go to Europe, or anywhere, than Bumblef#ck USA to play a Futures. Ducking the competition my ***..so how did the 'competition' do this week?
I was being satirical. There's a quite opinionated member here who claims to know college tennis pretty well. He claimed DB was ducking competition when he went to Europe for 4-5 weeks of clay Futures, and that the US Futures are harder and DB went to Europe to avoid the tougher US Futures that are usually filled with college players. I disagreed. Its in the Noah Rubin thread, I believe.

Plus, I was the one who started this thread.
 

onehandbh

Legend
If he can avoid any major injuries, I think he will eventually get into the top 100.

I think Rubin will as well as it seems like he has quite a bit of financial backing. Not many aspiring pros can afford to go through a couple hundred racquets as a junior.
 

mad dog1

G.O.A.T.
If he can avoid any major injuries, I think he will eventually get into the top 100.
idk, i didn't see anything in his game yesterday that leads me to believe he has top 100 potential. yeah, he did have some great placement on his 2nd serve and his forehand is pretty big, but doesn't have great touch and feel. he tried a few drop shots that were terrible.
 
I've been a reader of this and other tennis boards for a long time but have never posted anything to any of them. I played college tennis at a lower level. I have seen DB play a handful of times. This Futures win was a very solid result for him. He's showed very nice progress during the last few years. Best of luck to him going forward. I'd like to see him continue to advance and flourish.
 

Rob_C

Hall of Fame
I've been a reader of this and other tennis boards for a long time but have never posted anything to any of them. I played college tennis at a lower level. I have seen DB play a handful of times. This Futures win was a very solid result for him. He's showed very nice progress during the last few years. Best of luck to him going forward. I'd like to see him continue to advance and flourish.
Agreed. He beat 3 solid current/ex college players this week, McDonald, Austin, and Faneslow, who got to the NCAA semis in '13. Plus I believe he's undefeated, 3-0, against Alex Sarkissian, who cracked the top 200 this year. He's been playing the tour for about 2 yrs now, and he's on the verge of being able to get into Challenger qualies regularly now. Now's when he, and everybody else, will find out if he has what it takes to make it to the next level. You dont want to be stuck playing Futures your whole career.
 

GRANITECHIEF

Hall of Fame
NCAA winner and UVA #1 Ryan Shane and MM on now. Who ya got?
CA and Redlicki up next. Escobedo vs Giron, who takes it?
 

JW10S

Hall of Fame
I was being satirical. There's a quite opinionated member here who claims to know college tennis pretty well. He claimed DB was ducking competition when he went to Europe for 4-5 weeks of clay Futures, and that the US Futures are harder and DB went to Europe to avoid the tougher US Futures that are usually filled with college players. I disagreed. Its in the Noah Rubin thread, I believe.

Plus, I was the one who started this thread.
I was not directing my post to you, but to the 'opinionated member' you mention as I knew he would read it--and have to eat a little crow. His statements were absurd. I don't know why people who never played college or pro tennis themselves feel they are experts, they just often end up looking silly.
 

onehandbh

Legend
CA gets the chance. Nuthin EZ about that match even though CA won his last couple matches with DBomb.
How did the match go? I was following the scores a little bit online.

Looks like DB has improved and gained a lot of mental toughness from playing all a lot of futures tournaments in the last couple years.
 

Rob_C

Hall of Fame
Saw that, interesting. Wonder if he's trying to get back in the game or just helping out a buddy?
Saw that as well. I think he might be coaching that kid. The kid has played a few Futures, plus the Maui Challenger qualies. And they played dubs before at the Calabasas Futures.
 

Rob_C

Hall of Fame
Ouch Granite!! What happened?? Unexpected results, for me at least, Collin's last two losses.

Is he gonna play any of the West Coast Challengers??

Also, with his results these two weeks, I think DB is making a great case for a MD WC into the Tiburon Challenger next week. He's already in with the USTA PD.
 
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mikej

Hall of Fame
He beat 3 solid current/ex college players this week, McDonald, Austin, and Faneslow, who got to the NCAA semis in '13. Plus I believe he's undefeated, 3-0, against Alex Sarkissian, who cracked the top 200 this year. He's been playing the tour for about 2 yrs now, and he's on the verge of being able to get into Challenger qualies regularly now. Now's when he, and everybody else, will find out if he has what it takes to make it to the next level. You dont want to be stuck playing Futures your whole career.
a good summary post after the nice futures level run DB is on the past few weeks, good for him

--------------------------

not sure what I'm supposed to "eat crow" about to respond to some of the other recent posts in this thread - i'm still feeling pretty good about my long-term stance that he has little chance of a future as a pro at the ATP level - but to be determined - i'll keep some crow on the back-burner
 

NYCtennis13

New User
a good summary post after the nice futures level run DB is on the past few weeks, good for him

--------------------------

not sure what I'm supposed to "eat crow" about to respond to some of the other recent posts in this thread - i'm still feeling pretty good about my long-term stance that he has little chance of a future as a pro at the ATP level - but to be determined - i'll keep some crow on the back-burner
Given how big this thread has gotten, I feel as if I need to stop lurking and start sharing a DB story. Back in maybe like 2009 I played him in a men's open tournament. By that stage, I had spent around 8+ years in a 60 to 70 hour per week desk job, and was on the wrong side of 30. I had played college tennis for a top 40 program as a legit walk on, but nevertheless a walkon, and had won my share of real small weekend money tournaments in my 20s ($300 to $500). I only say this to give you guys some perspective on the level. I was playing about 1x per month at that stage, and had spent my 20s "playing myself into shape" in sporadic weekend men's open tournaments in the Northeast (Manhattan court time insanely expensive), where admittedly competition was very weak compared to where I played in Florida as a kid.

My friend and I decided to fly out to LA to play a men's open tournament-- maybe a money tournament, I really can't remember. I drew DB in either my first match or second match. He was 13 or 14 I think, though with each retelling of the story from my wife, he gets younger and younger. I think maybe he was 6 years old at this stage in the retelling......

We ended up splitting sets, and I lost in a super-10 like 10-7 or something----this was just when they were starting to get popular in men's tournaments. Anyway, I have obviously followed the kid's career since then, hoping one day to see him on Ashe and tell my friends I played him. At the time, I thought a few things:
1). He was legit. His strokes were clean off the ground, he was a lanky kid, and he certainly had a future in college, easily. His serve was odd---that's all I remember, but I remember thinking it needed some work. He was never going to be a low-level college recruit. Too good already at that age to be that lowly regarded and he had the frame to have real upside. As long as he stayed focused and healthy, he was easily going to be a blue chip recruit. 100%.
2). He was a nice kid. He hooked me on a big call on a running passing shot in the breaker, and I instinctively yelled "that's bull----" and he immediately said "You're right, I missed the call" as my sister and brother-in-law were rolling on the ground laughing at me trying to beat a 13 year-old kid. Now that I think about it, I am not even sure my wife was there....
3). His dad was a unique person, but respectful and not overbearing versus the other crazy parents I met in the tennis scene over the years. I think the Carson Challenger was that weekend, and I remember speaking to him during that, for like 30 minutes, which is about 29 minutes longer than most conversations I have, so maybe he was a bit pushy, but nothing absurd in my interaction. Sure, he elevated his kid and worked hard to sell him, but he was nowhere near most parents I have met over the years. He gave off the Christian vibe but that was all---nothing mean-spirited and he had quite the personal life story, too. I just sorta listened, and if I didn't follow his son's career, the entire content of the conversation would have faded from my memory.
4). I cheer for the guy. He recently lost a match to another player I know very well who I just played at a tournament this summer, and it sort of let me index DB progress. He is definitely not a pushover or an underacheiver based on what I saw of him at 14 versus where that result comes out now. The difference at the level he is trying to get to is so small, that to say he hasn't lived up to the hype or he is a failure, even if he never wins another ATP point, is unfair at this stage. Who knows at 15 whether a kid will be top 10, top 100 or top 350? The number of breaks you need in your favor coupled with the marginal difference at that stage, it's just too hard to predict.
5). If I were his parents I would have told him to spend 1 year at college, just because even if he is sucessful, he will be out of tennis by 35, so why not have that as a fallback no matter what? He definitely never has been a slam dunk, top 20 talent (who is, really?), so I would have pushed him to 1 year of school. But that's just me, and that's not specific to DB here.

Again, I have had zero interaction with the guy in 6 years, and have only followed at a distance as sort of a running family joke, but DB was legit back then, and I am happy to see his good results. I know this is a long post, but I thought I would share given the board controversy on this kid.
 

okdude1992

Hall of Fame
Given how big this thread has gotten, I feel as if I need to stop lurking and start sharing a DB story. Back in maybe like 2009 I played him in a men's open tournament. By that stage, I had spent around 8+ years in a 60 to 70 hour per week desk job, and was on the wrong side of 30. I had played college tennis for a top 40 program as a legit walk on, but nevertheless a walkon, and had won my share of real small weekend money tournaments in my 20s ($300 to $500). I only say this to give you guys some perspective on the level. I was playing about 1x per month at that stage, and had spent my 20s "playing myself into shape" in sporadic weekend men's open tournaments in the Northeast (Manhattan court time insanely expensive), where admittedly competition was very weak compared to where I played in Florida as a kid.

My friend and I decided to fly out to LA to play a men's open tournament-- maybe a money tournament, I really can't remember. I drew DB in either my first match or second match. He was 13 or 14 I think, though with each retelling of the story from my wife, he gets younger and younger. I think maybe he was 6 years old at this stage in the retelling......

We ended up splitting sets, and I lost in a super-10 like 10-7 or something----this was just when they were starting to get popular in men's tournaments. Anyway, I have obviously followed the kid's career since then, hoping one day to see him on Ashe and tell my friends I played him. At the time, I thought a few things:
1). He was legit. His strokes were clean off the ground, he was a lanky kid, and he certainly had a future in college, easily. His serve was odd---that's all I remember, but I remember thinking it needed some work. He was never going to be a low-level college recruit. Too good already at that age to be that lowly regarded and he had the frame to have real upside. As long as he stayed focused and healthy, he was easily going to be a blue chip recruit. 100%.
2). He was a nice kid. He hooked me on a big call on a running passing shot in the breaker, and I instinctively yelled "that's bull----" and he immediately said "You're right, I missed the call" as my sister and brother-in-law were rolling on the ground laughing at me trying to beat a 13 year-old kid. Now that I think about it, I am not even sure my wife was there....
3). His dad was a unique person, but respectful and not overbearing versus the other crazy parents I met in the tennis scene over the years. I think the Carson Challenger was that weekend, and I remember speaking to him during that, for like 30 minutes, which is about 29 minutes longer than most conversations I have, so maybe he was a bit pushy, but nothing absurd in my interaction. Sure, he elevated his kid and worked hard to sell him, but he was nowhere near most parents I have met over the years. He gave off the Christian vibe but that was all---nothing mean-spirited and he had quite the personal life story, too. I just sorta listened, and if I didn't follow his son's career, the entire content of the conversation would have faded from my memory.
4). I cheer for the guy. He recently lost a match to another player I know very well who I just played at a tournament this summer, and it sort of let me index DB progress. He is definitely not a pushover or an underacheiver based on what I saw of him at 14 versus where that result comes out now. The difference at the level he is trying to get to is so small, that to say he hasn't lived up to the hype or he is a failure, even if he never wins another ATP point, is unfair at this stage. Who knows at 15 whether a kid will be top 10, top 100 or top 350? The number of breaks you need in your favor coupled with the marginal difference at that stage, it's just too hard to predict.
5). If I were his parents I would have told him to spend 1 year at college, just because even if he is sucessful, he will be out of tennis by 35, so why not have that as a fallback no matter what? He definitely never has been a slam dunk, top 20 talent (who is, really?), so I would have pushed him to 1 year of school. But that's just me, and that's not specific to DB here.

Again, I have had zero interaction with the guy in 6 years, and have only followed at a distance as sort of a running family joke, but DB was legit back then, and I am happy to see his good results. I know this is a long post, but I thought I would share given the board controversy on this kid.
Nice post. I never understood the hate, but his dad rubbed some people on here the wrong way. I remember seeing the videos posted, and at the time I assumed DB would be a D1 college player. Didn't realize he would be where he is now... I'd say he's very poised to get his ranking inside 200. In any case he's obviously not a world beater like Brad predicted, but being a decent pro and making somewhat of a living at the challengers would still be an amazing accomplishment. Surely egg in the face for some posters around here.
 

mikej

Hall of Fame
being a decent pro and making somewhat of a living at the challengers would still be an amazing accomplishment. Surely egg in the face for some posters around here.
i don't really follow - let's say he has the career of someone like jan hernych (i randomly selected a longterm journeyman slightly inside the top 200 - hernych turned pro in 1998 and is ranked 195 right now)

after nearly two decades on tour - including peaking inside the top 60 in 2009 - hernych has a pre-tax total prize money of 2.1 million

i guess you think a similar career for DB would be egg in my face?

my perspective would be 1) should have gone to college or 2) should have dropped out of high school and spent those two decades working a minimum wage job and saving instead of spending probably 90% of meager winnings on travel / training / etc

and, btw, some people on this board seem to think my livelihood depends on DB failing at making it on tour because i was outspoken and realistic about a kid with no top level junior tournament wins going pro before college...
sure, he'll have proven me (and the odds) wrong if he spends years and years inside the top 50 on tour and makes a nice living out there, but it's not going to really affect my life, sorry
 

okdude1992

Hall of Fame
@mikej Well I wasn't talking about you specifically. I remember someone saying he'd be a D2 player at best. Which is kind of humorous. A few years ago, I would have said skipping college was a mistake. But now he's beating a lot of the best current/past college guys. College isn't right for everyone.

Anyway, if he has the career you just described I'd say that he was a success. It's pretty impressive if you can make a living off tennis, and it opens up opportunities after playing. Even if his ranking stays in the 300-400 range, and he never makes a living off tennis, oh well. At least he had the experience many dream of.
 

Rob_C

Hall of Fame
DB got one of the MD WCs into the Tiburon Challenger next week, so he'll be making his Challenger MD debut. Hope he gets a good draw.
 

Rob_C

Hall of Fame
i don't really follow - let's say he has the career of someone like jan hernych (i randomly selected a longterm journeyman slightly inside the top 200 - hernych turned pro in 1998 and is ranked 195 right now)

after nearly two decades on tour - including peaking inside the top 60 in 2009 - hernych has a pre-tax total prize money of 2.1 million

i guess you think a similar career for DB would be egg in my face?

my perspective would be 1) should have gone to college or 2) should have dropped out of high school and spent those two decades working a minimum wage job and saving instead of spending probably 90% of meager winnings on travel / training / etc

and, btw, some people on this board seem to think my livelihood depends on DB failing at making it on tour because i was outspoken and realistic about a kid with no top level junior tournament wins going pro before college...
sure, he'll have proven me (and the odds) wrong if he spends years and years inside the top 50 on tour and makes a nice living out there, but it's not going to really affect my life, sorry
What about Tim Smyczek?? He went pro right out of high school in 2006. Played mostly Futures for about 2-3 yrs, then Challengers for the next 2-3 yrs. Would get into Slam qualie draws but mostly lose, not too much success qualifying for Slams. But, he stuck with it, and the past couple years he's been right around the top 100. Sometimes falling out, but lately always seems to get on a run and get back into the top 100. He's made 1.2M since 2006. Would you consider him a success?? I would. Cause now he's making money, he's getting DA into pretty much all the slams, and most tour events.

@mikej Well I wasn't talking about you specifically. I remember someone saying he'd be a D2 player at best. Which is kind of humorous.

Anyway, if he has the career you just described I'd say that he was a success. It's pretty impressive if you can make a living off tennis, and it opens up opportunities after playing. Even if his ranking stays in the 300-400 range, and he never makes a living off tennis, oh well. At least he had the experience many dream of.
Pretty sure that was TCF who said that. I agree about the opportunities after his pro career. He can easily get a good paying coaching position at an upscale tennis club with his current accomplishments, much less after 10 more years on tour.
 

mikej

Hall of Fame
What about Tim Smyczek?? ... He's made 1.2M since 2006. Would you consider him a success?? I would. Cause now he's making money, he's getting DA into pretty much all the slams, and most tour events.
yeah, smyczek is doing pretty well - if he keeps up his success for a while, he should make quite a lot more than my hernych example over the course of his career
 

mad dog1

G.O.A.T.
Just watched DB lose to Ryan Shane in straight sets 2 and 3 at the Costa Mesa futures SF. He couldn't handle Ryan's power.

Good player for sure but I don't see him cracking the top 100. Never know though.
 

JW10S

Hall of Fame
Actually the score was 2 & 4, but anyway he won 8 pro matches in a row--pretty good. Tough to win 10 matches in 2 weeks at any professional level--it starts to catch up with you (although D. Novikov, who doesn't have a college degree, has a chance to do that in a rematch with R. Harrison tomorrow). DB is clearly improving, already doing better than a lot of players who played college tennis (many of whom do not have degrees), he has a sponsor, and is doing what he wants to do. Why some people are so arrogant they feel the need to preach what other people should do with their lives, even though they themselves were never in the same position, is something I find humorous. He turned pro instead of going to college--deal with it. Maybe it's not what you would have done, but guess what, no one cares...
 
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mikej

Hall of Fame
Why some people are so arrogant they feel the need to preach what other people should do with their lives, even though they themselves were never in the same position, is something I find humorous. He turned pro instead of going to college--deal with it. Maybe it's not what you would have done, but guess what, no one cares...
umm, people tend to comment on other people in internet forums

if you go to a political forum, expect people to be weighing in on politicians, even if they were never in politics

if you enter a tennis thread about an individual player, expect people to be weighing in on that player, even if they were never playing at that level

not that complicated - if that offends you, i'd recommend buzzing off, rather than getting on a high horse

i find you humorous too, so we at least have that in common
 

onehandbh

Legend
i don't really follow - let's say he has the career of someone like jan hernych (i randomly selected a longterm journeyman slightly inside the top 200 - hernych turned pro in 1998 and is ranked 195 right now)

after nearly two decades on tour - including peaking inside the top 60 in 2009 - hernych has a pre-tax total prize money of 2.1 million


my perspective would be 1) should have gone to college or 2) should have dropped out of high school and spent those two decades working a minimum wage job and saving instead of spending probably 90% of meager winnings on travel / training / etc
Your post is quite interesting. We all have to make choices in life. Some people lean towards security & stability -- be it financial, emotional, etc. Then there are others who seek out an adventure with little safety blanket. There are also others who choose to fight for a cause or pursue a passion with less regard for financial reward.

None of the choices are necessarily better or worse. Just choices on which path we choose to take. One thing is for sure, though. In most professional sports, if you don't pursue it early in life, it is hard to go back. In other careers you can change easier.

My suggestions?
Whatever you do, set & pursue your goals, live with as few regrets as possible, enjoy the experience of everyday life, appreciate what you have and those around you, and if you have the inclination, try to help your fellow man and be a good guardian of the planet.
 

JW10S

Hall of Fame
rather than getting on a high horse
Hahaha, now that was funny! Pot calling the kettle black. You use Hernych as an example, but you neglect to mention he had a career high ranking of 59 in the world. Anyone entering any professional sport knows there is a risk. And as I have mentioned many times, many college athletes take the minimum credits necessary to be eligible to compete, but if you do that for 4 years you will not graduate. So many athletes who went to college, even for 4 years, have no degree, and they are playing the same tournaments, are they really better off than DB? And just like professional sports, going to college is no sure thing either, there's a guy who works as a server in a restaurant near me who has a PhD yet he can only get work waiting tables. Most of these players start playing tennis at a very young age and put a lot of time and effort into the sport, to then just paint with a broad brush that 'you should go to college' is just not going to work for some and is really not realistic. UCLA coach Billy Martin went to college for one year, taking the minimum units, then turned pro. After his pro career ended due to injuries he went back to school, earned a BA, then went on to earn a graduate degree, and now earns a hefty 6 figure salary from UCLA (plus the $ he earns from his camps) being involved in a sport he spent his whole life playing. So such a thing is not unheard of. In pro sports it often is 'now or never', not so with education.
 
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