Denis Shapovalov to Yonex

iceman_dl6

Professional
Shapo just lost to Pouille (very avg player imo). I know in the past, I’ve said he shouldn’t change frames. But now, I think he should, the SV95, I’ve used it before, has a smallish sweetspot and if you’re not in the groove, like Denis right now, it will somewhat hurt you. Maybe something like at least a 98 18x20 will be more ideal, i think .
 

azrael201

Rookie
Shapo just lost to Pouille (very avg player imo). I know in the past, I’ve said he shouldn’t change frames. But now, I think he should, the SV95, I’ve used it before, has a smallish sweetspot and if you’re not in the groove, like Denis right now, it will somewhat hurt you. Maybe something like at least a 98 18x20 will be more ideal, i think .
No way is Lucas Pouille a very average player. You have to respect these veteran players that are still competing cause they are still that good. I doubt it's his racquet, but certainly a safer racquet may help him.
 

TomTennis495

Semi-Pro
Shapo just lost to Pouille (very avg player imo). I know in the past, I’ve said he shouldn’t change frames. But now, I think he should, the SV95, I’ve used it before, has a smallish sweetspot and if you’re not in the groove, like Denis right now, it will somewhat hurt you. Maybe something like at least a 98 18x20 will be more ideal, i think .
Very average wouldn’t be 31 in the world. Pouille is a great player with seasons behind his belt
 

Frans Bleker

Professional
Shapo just lost to Pouille (very avg player imo). I know in the past, I’ve said he shouldn’t change frames. But now, I think he should, the SV95, I’ve used it before, has a smallish sweetspot and if you’re not in the groove, like Denis right now, it will somewhat hurt you. Maybe something like at least a 98 18x20 will be more ideal, i think .
Shapovalov, just turned 20 loses from a player a player who plays for years in the top (rank 10 career high), and is well in shape and you propose he should switch rackets?

And also he could add some weight at 3 & 9.
 

iceman_dl6

Professional
Well he beat P-H Herbert ranked in the top 40 in Montreal, I don’t see why he would lose IN STRAIGHT sets to Pouille? And I’m not saying that he should not make other changes besides his racquet either. The fact is that since his win vs Nadal in MTL 2017, his performance has been mediocre. As a Shapo fan, I’m a bit disappointed and want him to perform better. Imo, since he is still young and struggling, maybe testing a few frames wouldn’t hurt. Look at Fed when he switched to his RF97!
 

dr. godmode

Professional
Shapo's problem is his enormous take back. He's always so late to the ball and his mediocre footwork doesn't help. I played with the SV95 for a long time and i don't find it much less forgiving than a Blade. It just as wide as most 98's. Usually they have the extra head space vertically, not horizontally.
 

ron schaap

Hall of Fame
it's not the frame guys.. Pouille isn't a chump and has been doing well under Mauresomo's wing.
Wouldnt we all fare well under the warm wings of Mauresmo? :love:
Besides i dont understand why sv95 is a worse racquet than the much applauded 95d of stan the man, of which it is an improvement?
To me only Tsitsipas stands out as a next gen, Shapolov is only known for misusing a ball out of anger thereby hitting an official or was it a spectator? Kind of kyrgios behaviour.
 

NTFIII

New User
Shapo just lost to Pouille (very avg player imo). I know in the past, I’ve said he shouldn’t change frames. But now, I think he should, the SV95, I’ve used it before, has a smallish sweetspot and if you’re not in the groove, like Denis right now, it will somewhat hurt you. Maybe something like at least a 98 18x20 will be more ideal, i think .
There are Very many aspects to Your statement which are incorrect, have incorrect basis, and with poor conclusions.
As, many replies have stated, Pouille, is not 'an average player'.As stated and confirmed by his ATP ranking along with AO performance [defeated Milos Raonic reaching QF].
Your personal experience, You state is very suspect, and seems to have a strange bais too. Many ATP & WTA players use a 95 s.i. and those of Yonex too. Also a Yonex ISOMETRIC head shape plays more similar in 'sweet spot" area to other frames larger, also having more Mains with consistent length and Crosses is part of this. Have started with using Yonex ISO METRIC in 1984 with R-22 [90 s.i. (which still prefer)]. As, another stated, Stan Wawrinka still uses a Yonex 95 too. If You would know the difference in feel, play, materials, etc.and actually use a pro stock, Your opinion might change. Also,players rarely actually make changes or minor changes in their frames throughout their career [contrary to the commercial/public/retail versions offered]. The top level players and good to excellent players from NRTP 5 + to NCAA level, toop juniors, and pros know the frame is an essential part of their equipment, but the most important aspects are in the user of the equipment, body & bio-mechanics, ental, emotionanal, physical, not subtle changes in the equipment. Yes at the top pro level, subtle changes are important, but they also know what, in what, where, and how to make the adjustments, including the team.
As for the general 95 s.i. frame, am adding a few more top level players to consider: Novak Djokovic {Head], Juan Martin Del Potro [Wilson], Dominic Thiem [Babolat], Kevin Anderson [Dunlop-Srixon] (there are many others including past top 10 and current ATP: Grigor Dimitrov, Philip Kohlschreiber, Jo Wilfred Tsonga, Gael Monfils and many who use smaller from 90 s.i. - < 95,: Roger Federer for vast majority of carrier, titles, GS's, records, Robin Soderling, Lleyton Hewitt, etc.]. Some ATP pros are using 97-98 and a few may have 100. There may be norre women on WTA using from 95-100 s.i., though many also are using between 95-98 s.i. Martina Navratilova may have switched from 90 s.i. to 95 si. in her much older age. [according to more recent videos and pervious time with Bosworth/Fox in between Yonex].
Main point: THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects to a players performance come from the producer, the player, not the equipment, The equipment is the extension of the arm, hand, body and mind of the person. As the arm and hand of the person are the extension of the body, are not the essential aspect, rather direct the body's efforts and can add some elements, similarly the frame is an extension and can add some small, but tiny affects.Then making small, tiny adjustments in the frame add that much smaller affects.
The same is true for each of us at our level of play, development, 'mastery'. The essential are the body & bio-mechanics, fundamentals and techniques. Then We have quite literally, a solid base to build upon for further developments, improvements, additions, refinements which can improve our results. Another very essential fundament element is the mental which includes the visual, imagination, attitude and emotion.

My few times that my thoughts notice to be critical of any pro player or otherwise, is in their use of basic fundamental body & bio-mechanics, execution [or lack in a proper base for lower level players]. or in a noticeable, possible, issues in the various mental aspects [which only the person know for certain, and a close team member can discuss, develop or solicit an additional person to help (see Simona Halep - her statements about Darrin Cahill, and various others like Andre Agassi (from Brad Gilbert) , also those he helps,Pete Sampras about Tim Gullikson, Andy Murray with Ivan Lendl (and Ivan himself), Arthur Ashe about John McEnroe (in early start on tour) and a large amount of others. We can see how much affect the mental has in the positive and negative from Monica Seles too.

Hope You will find these concepts helpful and make of them useful for Yourself, and for Your tennis, which hope You will enjoy more and more.
[May others also benefit who read this too.]
All The Best!
Sincerely,
:)
 
the frame is an extension and can add some small, but tiny affects.
Do you believe that at his peak, Rafael Nadal could produce the same HEAVY RPMs on his FH with a 90 or 95 that he could with his beloved 100 APD?

What about Borg? What sort of ball could he have been able to produce if he was using a 100 with Poly strings at the height of his powers?
 

McEncock

Professional
RPM has nothing to do with frame size.
Look at Berasategui’s 89.5 si frame forehand, and spare some useless comments
 

NTFIII

New User
Wouldnt we all fare well under the warm wings of Mauresmo? :love:
Besides i dont understand why sv95 is a worse racquet than the much applauded 95d of stan the man, of which it is an improvement?
To me only Tsitsipas stands out as a next gen, Shapolov is only known for misusing a ball out of anger thereby hitting an official or was it a spectator? Kind of kyrgios behaviour.
Many good observations, about having Mauresmo and "Stan The Man" Wawrinka using a Yonex 95 s.i. frame [still]. Interesting that Denis' backhand is quite similar and powerful to Stan's, in cross-court, down-the-line, passing shots, it is a weapon, and from the other side, as a left-handed player too.
As for Your statement about "NextGen", it seems a little out of balance and premature. Stefanos, has shown more results, and achieved a higher ranking among current <21 year olds, and shows possibly more significant results, especially in the recent months than soe previous "NextGen" who are close to his age and slightly older.
However, in balance, Alexander Zverev has won 2 Masters titles in 2017, 1 i 2018 and ATP Finals 2018. This year of 2019 has not been near these good results, and appears to be struggling currently, though not performed [yet] well in the GS tournaments..Dominic Thiem has won significant titles, and reach SF of RG-FO multiple times, and won 2019 IW Masters, then struggled in Miami [the next week, and much faster court surface], and currently struggling since, seems to have injury issues now too. Daniil Medvedev has sparked a run now in the summer hard courts again from Washington D.C.-Citi Open (though lost Final to Nick), Final in Rogers Cup in Montrèal (losing to Rafael), and now in Cincinnati has a ongoing high level play and run (we'll see how far he goes and in Flushing Meadows, N.Y.at the USO, and onward). Felix has been doing excellent, though more challenged or something needs adjustment, improvement, which resulted in 2R & 1R losses in Canada and Cincinnati. Karen Khachanov has shown good to excellent improvements continuing, as we see his results has lifted him into top 8 ranking now. Daniil seems to be rising above him currently now. Just this week, Andrey Rublev, who is also of the same group with Karen and Daniil, etc.has some good success, then difficulties, struggles, injuries has put together an amazing run in Cincinnati, including a major win over Roger in straight sets! Am interested and excited to see the continued results there and where this leads. To me, there are numerous "NextGen" that show, indicate and have the tools, weapons, play, mental, results which shows us that tennis competition is continuing into the next generations and We will have much to enjoy, also when each of the current top players over 30 years, gradually in each one's time, move onward. Some of these are already challenging the top levels and reaching into the upper rankings. Others need a little more time and experience. Stefanos has shown exciting, wonderful tennis, and results to all, though very recently seems to be struggling. We are expecting and awaiting his suitable increase again.
Your statement referring to Denis' mishapi [n that Davis Cup match], is actually been quite important for Denis, who has taken it seriously, thus adjusted his attitude, behavior and conduct, since, which is much to his personal credit. Imagine if John McEnroe or a few other known player who displayed some poor attitude, behavior, conduct, had learned early from such an occurrence, how much more each could focus, apply, execute and perform. See how John (also states) behaved, conducted himself during matches with Bjorn Borg,when he needed all of his efforts, focus, ability to compete and possibly defeat Bjorn. Bjorn Borg also sates (and others), how he was banned from the tennis club for [6] months for misbehavior, which had such a significant, 'dramatic" completely changed him, his attitude, behavior, conduct., focus and results. Maybe Denis also will continue to have some significant results from such changes.
For me, Stefanos, Daniil, Felix, Denis, Karen, Andrey, Alexander and a few others have game styles, play, weapons and mental aspects that will likely result in them being in the competitive top levels There are a few others, and some we have not seen nor heard much about [Soonwong (another Korean, also the other may return well also) is one quite a good one, possibility to watch]
Also, note, Juan Martin and Marin Cilic are of the same age/generation. Marin had slightly more success earlier in 2008, but Juan Martin rose quickly, better, surpassing in 2009, SF AO and winning USO, rising to #4. Then he had his first serious injury, surgery and return in 2012, Olympics in London, epic SF vs Roger, Bronze medal win over Novak, continuing growth in 2013, epic 5 set SF vs Novak at Wimbledon, rising into top ranks, then repeat of injury, surgery. Return after a repeated surgery within that\ recovery, in 2016 Olympics in Rio, defeating #1 Novak 1R, Rafael Nadal in SF, Losing to Andy Murray in F, attaining a Silver medal. Then continuing to rise in 2017 USO SF and 2018 IW Title [1st Masters], RG-FO SF, Wimbledon SF, USO F successes and reaching #3 again. Sadly near year end, possibly reaching #2 and ATP Final, injured his knee cap; a fracture. :(( Then, began a recovery, stalled, return again, improving, rising, additional injury and surgery, now recovering again (we hope to see his return again, soon, and be healthy). During on period of Juan Martin's recovery, Marin Cilic, though, was in the top 16 or better, managed to rise and win at USO 2014, defeating Roger in SF and Kei (who defeated Novak in SF) in Final, then in 2017 reached Wimbledon Final and 2018 AO Final. He often struggles other tournaments but maintained a top 8 ranking since, until recently too.
We do not know what will be with a player, until it becomes more revealed. Novak also won Masters in 2007 [Miami & Cincinnati], then AO in 2008, then struggled in most GS SF matches until 2010 USO, defeating Roger, then onto another at a Masters, then ATP Finals, and his huge burst of results in 2011, onward, more majors, and amassing the runs in 2014-2016, then with injury subsided, and has returned in 2018 at Wimbledon, continuing.
We do not know what will happen, until it does, though there are indications. The most important are usually the sound, solid fundamentals in all areas physical, mental, emotional. Then the results often are revealed. Some more than others. Some for more time and duration than others. Each has as different 'race track", time frame and clock.John Isner's most significant results have come later in his carrier and age, as these other player are also playing at some of their best older too. Some have started earlier, and ended earlier. Boris Becker won first GS-Wimbledon at 17+ in 1985. Ivan Lendl took longer within his age and life winning first GS-RG-FO in 1984, Stephan Edberg in between, Jimmy Connors began his huge success in 1974 at 21+, and played until 40, Pete Sampras won first GS-USO 1990 at 19 ending in 2002, Andre Agassi won first GS at Wimbledon 1992 at 22 ending in 2005. Jim Courier won first GS in 1991 at 21 ending before Pete. There are those of Lleyton Hewitt, Marin Safrin, Andy Roddick who won GS titles early, then struggled or a Pat Cash and Patrick Rafter or Michael Stich or Richard Krajicek, Tomas Muster. and others. Sometimes in retrospect there are elements more revealing or some which were noticeable proved to be significant, more so, or not improved upon or limiters.
The future will be revealed, in the appropriate time, situation and occurrences as they unfold and develop.
[Did ANYONE think or predict Andrey Rublev as a Qualifier would defeat Roger Federer in Cincinnati 2019 3R??!! (besides Andrey and his team]
{Seems this IS, THE BIGGEST surprising result in the ATP in 2019, perhaps 2018, and since Denis in 2017 at Rogers Cup Montrèal, maybe bigger]

Perhaps a bit more and increase in breath and depth of though view, perspective, perception with a a broader view and more balanced approach will allow a better, enjoyable view.

D)

Sincerely,
:)
 

NTFIII

New User
RPM has nothing to do with frame size.
Look at Berasategui’s 89.5 si frame forehand, and spare some useless comments
Agreed, the significant aspects in the amount and type of spins are based upon the techniques and methods in the stoke productions, most essentially from the body and biomechanics Bjorn already possessed the body mechanics and techniques of the modern strokes.. Look closely at hos form, and the amount of top-spin he had. Ther are many others too. Harold Solomon already used a full Western grip too.
The graphite frames and midsize head size allows the player to do some additional things and the frames are a bit longer giving more leverage.
Have You noticed Bjorn also held the handle near the end, also as Rafael does? His grip was more eastern like Roger though and produced more top spin. Bjorn also used extremely high tension, thin gut strings [~85 lbs], which he stated gave him more control.
Obviously their game styles are very different. Have You seen Bjorn play on the Seniors Tour with a midsize graphite composite. Earliest i saw, he used a Dunlop marked frame appearing to be painted like a 100 series [90 s.i.] which seems to match the apparent visual estimated size.
Rafael seems to have a more :whipping" action or :slings shot" action, in his technique. Bjorn also was wielding a much heavier frame of wood with steel reinforcement. Though he sill uses the same form and technique with a new frame, as John McEnroe does [comparatively and relatively] though his changes from wood to small midsize graphite composite to midsize to MP [98].
As had stated, too much emphasis is often placed upon the racquet//racket frame, and actually comes from and through the body mechanics.
Hope this gives You something(s) to think about, ponder, and investigate, hopefully finding the best for Your tennis.
Sincerely,
:)
 

NTFIII

New User
Shapo's problem is his enormous take back. He's always so late to the ball and his mediocre footwork doesn't help. I played with the SV95 for a long time and i don't find it much less forgiving than a Blade. It just as wide as most 98's. Usually they have the extra head space vertically, not horizontally.
Your statement about the Yonex ISOMETRIC seems correct, mostly. Am a long time user of one since 1984, R-22, 90 s.i. [It was HUGE for me, changing from standard head sized, and could not quite imagine using a larger oversize of 107 +] (now can use a 95-97/8, but prefer the slightly smaller, and certainly S-L to L mass of 12-12.5 oz + strings (approx. 340-355g + strings = ~355-370g) and some extra length too.
[oh, if You are wondering, or thinking how difficult that seems to use, consider am 60 years old, 163 cm, 52-3 kg., athletic, agile, quick, excellent balanced and movement still]

If You think You know that much about tennis to analyze, criticize, instruct, guide, perhaps You could approach Denis' team or get involved with another team or development of players?

Sincerely,
:)
 

NTFIII

New User
Shapovalov, just turned 20 loses from a player a player who plays for years in the top (rank 10 career high), and is well in shape and you propose he should switch rackets?

And also he could add some weight at 3 & 9.
Agreed, Your point is well stated in short and sarcastically,
Adding weight may or may not benefit him, but he and his team know better than We do.
Also, someone who states changing from a Yonex ISOMETRIC 95 to another head shape [97-]98 18x20 does not have much knowledge nor experience with a Yonex ISOMETRIC nor how to compare them. People who know,, such a Yonex frame plays similar to a 97-98 in many ways, though has unique differences which are beneficial.
[As stated am a long time user of the Yonex Isometric since 1984, with a R-22 (90 si.), 16x19]
My other posting on the topic in this thread covers many concepts and misconceptions.
Sincerely,
:)
 

NTFIII

New User
Shapo just lost to Pouille (very avg player imo). I know in the past, I’ve said he shouldn’t change frames. But now, I think he should, the SV95, I’ve used it before, has a smallish sweetspot and if you’re not in the groove, like Denis right now, it will somewhat hurt you. Maybe something like at least a 98 18x20 will be more ideal, i think .
Please see my reply to who responded to Your reply; dr. godmode.
Thanks.
 

ron schaap

Hall of Fame
There are Very many aspects to Your statement which are incorrect, have incorrect basis, and with poor conclusions.
As, many replies have stated, Pouille, is not 'an average player'.As stated and confirmed by his ATP ranking along with AO performance [defeated Milos Raonic reaching QF].
Your personal experience, You state is very suspect, and seems to have a strange bais too. Many ATP & WTA players use a 95 s.i. and those of Yonex too. Also a Yonex ISOMETRIC head shape plays more similar in 'sweet spot" area to other frames larger, also having more Mains with consistent length and Crosses is part of this. Have started with using Yonex ISO METRIC in 1984 with R-22 [90 s.i. (which still prefer)]. As, another stated, Stan Wawrinka still uses a Yonex 95 too. If You would know the difference in feel, play, materials, etc.and actually use a pro stock, Your opinion might change. Also,players rarely actually make changes or minor changes in their frames throughout their career [contrary to the commercial/public/retail versions offered]. The top level players and good to excellent players from NRTP 5 + to NCAA level, toop juniors, and pros know the frame is an essential part of their equipment, but the most important aspects are in the user of the equipment, body & bio-mechanics, ental, emotionanal, physical, not subtle changes in the equipment. Yes at the top pro level, subtle changes are important, but they also know what, in what, where, and how to make the adjustments, including the team.
As for the general 95 s.i. frame, am adding a few more top level players to consider: Novak Djokovic {Head], Juan Martin Del Potro [Wilson], Dominic Thiem [Babolat], Kevin Anderson [Dunlop-Srixon] (there are many others including past top 10 and current ATP: Grigor Dimitrov, Philip Kohlschreiber, Jo Wilfred Tsonga, Gael Monfils and many who use smaller from 90 s.i. - < 95,: Roger Federer for vast majority of carrier, titles, GS's, records, Robin Soderling, Lleyton Hewitt, etc.]. Some ATP pros are using 97-98 and a few may have 100. There may be norre women on WTA using from 95-100 s.i., though many also are using between 95-98 s.i. Martina Navratilova may have switched from 90 s.i. to 95 si. in her much older age. [according to more recent videos and pervious time with Bosworth/Fox in between Yonex].
Main point: THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects to a players performance come from the producer, the player, not the equipment, The equipment is the extension of the arm, hand, body and mind of the person. As the arm and hand of the person are the extension of the body, are not the essential aspect, rather direct the body's efforts and can add some elements, similarly the frame is an extension and can add some small, but tiny affects.Then making small, tiny adjustments in the frame add that much smaller affects.
The same is true for each of us at our level of play, development, 'mastery'. The essential are the body & bio-mechanics, fundamentals and techniques. Then We have quite literally, a solid base to build upon for further developments, improvements, additions, refinements which can improve our results. Another very essential fundament element is the mental which includes the visual, imagination, attitude and emotion.
My few times that my thoughts notice to be critical of any pro player or otherwise, is in their use of basic fundamental body & bio-mechanics, execution [or lack in a proper base for lower level players]. or in a noticeable, possible, issues in the various mental aspects [which only the person know for certain, and a close team member can discuss, develop or solicit an additional person to help (see Simona Halep - her statements about Darrin Cahill, and various others like Andre Agassi (from Brad Gilbert) , also those he helps,Pete Sampras about Tim Gullikson, Andy Murray with Ivan Lendl (and Ivan himself), Arthur Ashe about John McEnroe (in early start on tour) and a large amount of others. We can see how much affect the mental has in the positive and negative from Monica Seles too.
Hope You will find these concepts helpful and make of them useful for Yourself, and for Your tennis, which hope You will enjoy more and more.
[May others also benefit who read this too.]
All The Best!
Sincerely,
:)
Tnx.
You must know that in my country Netherlands only grandslams and the aRotterdam indoors are broadcast on tv. So are my conclusions. Furthermore Thiem is no real next gen anymore, but an arrived player to me.
So therefore Tsitsipas remains who did wel this year.
When the big 3 stop it is important others take over, with at least the same talent ;)
 
Last edited:

iceman_dl6

Professional
Ok soo I have seen numerous pictures of Shapo using the Vcore SV95 and no one has any conclusive evidence where he puts lead on his frame. This is really surprising as the SV95 stock is around 320g.
If you don’t see the lead, it’s probably under the bumper and/or inside the handle.
 

ron schaap

Hall of Fame
330g unstrung, 6±7 grams lead under the bumper, rest in the handle.
I dont think so.
The stock 95 is supposed to weight already 320gr. An overgrip weights around 7 gr. So then you have 327gr unstrung. Furthermore the Yonex grips are known to be light and thin. So when replaced by another brand this accounts already for a few gr extra weight.
So probably the Canadian has no extra weight on his racquets like Goffin and Kachanov have none added. Its no big deal really.
 

Frans Bleker

Professional
I dont think so.
The stock 95 is supposed to weight already 320gr. An overgrip weights around 7 gr. So then you have 327gr unstrung. Furthermore the Yonex grips are known to be light and thin. So when replaced by another brand this accounts already for a few gr extra weight.
So probably the Canadian has no extra weight on his racquets like Goffin and Kachanov have none added. Its no big deal really.
If im right he uses the stock vc sv 95, which is 310 unstrung. He added close to 20 grams in Total, 6/7 in the head and the rest in the handle. And usally unstrung means no overgrip.
 

cyanide43

Rookie
1. The racquet and setup the player uses matters a lot
2. Shapo doesn't add the lead himself, his customizer does
3. Amount of lead and where varies from frame to frame to achieve consistent numbers
4. 95 inch head is less forgiving than a 98, but for his flatter and more precision game it probably works better. Novak uses a 95 too, and he's incredibly solid, obviously. I believe the bigger differences rest in his racquets' weight and balance, which demand very large windups that lead to risky play. He could potentially be served better by a lighter, more head heavy racquet.
5. There's an aspect of the player to the equation, too. Denis is just having a tough year, may have to do with him growing up.
 

ron schaap

Hall of Fame
If im right he uses the stock vc sv 95, which is 310 unstrung. He added close to 20 grams in Total, 6/7 in the head and the rest in the handle. And usally unstrung means no overgrip.
i just used the info of Gugafan. :oops:
I was not aware of these other conventions. However only 7 gr in the head/hoop is not a lot!
 

HeavyHitter

New User
Cool! Finally specs on Shapo's stick!
I'm currently playing with the vcore sv 95 and my spec is very similar. 332gr , 30.5cm (with overgrip) . Ive added Babolat leather grip and 2 strips of lead at 12' . I'll take some pics when I get home.
 

Frans Bleker

Professional
i just used the info of Gugafan. :oops:
I was not aware of these other conventions. However only 7 gr in the head/hoop is not a lot!
Depending on the stock SW. But 324 was measured as average by TW so lets say 6.5 would add about 25 SW which would almost give Shapo a 350 SW. It's probably in the 345-350 SW area.
 

jmacdaununder2

Hall of Fame
He certainly needs to continue to develop his defensive skills; in this match the way he appeared to blast backhands when out of position, thereby giving his opponent a relatively easy volley, instead of attempting to roll the ball back low and make his opponent volley up to create a passing opportunity on the next shot lacked the nous of say a Murray or Djoker. He also seems to prefer to lunge/jump in situations where a Djoker or Agassi would take an extra step; this higher dd shot making style doesn't make using a 95" any easier I'm guessing, but it definitely makes for spectacular viewing.
 
I don't think a larger frame would change much to be honest...the fact he played great tennis this week is testament to his hard work on and off the court. Racket head size, especially the minute change from 95 to 97 or 98, is not going to make him a slam winner....it's personal preference.
 

Crashbaby

Semi-Pro
Hits with more power and spin than most on tour, he doesn't need a more powerful, or higher spin producing larger frame. Thats crazy talk. He is only 20, He is doing just fine. Now with this win, he has something to build on. Just cast your memory back to Rafa loosing to him in Canada.... The 95 did just fine against the APD on that occasion and will again in the future :)
 
Hits with more power and spin than most on tour, he doesn't need a more powerful, or higher spin producing larger frame. Thats crazy talk. He is only 20, He is doing just fine. Now with this win, he has something to build on. Just cast your memory back to Rafa loosing to him in Canada.... The 95 did just fine against the APD on that occasion and will again in the future :)
completely agree
 

Frans Bleker

Professional
After Shapo barely scraped through to win his first title, a measly 250, at the old age of 20, can we all finally agree with @Karma Tennis that he needs to switch to a bigger frame?
I think he might benefit more from the VCore 98, or at least lead at 3 & 9. The low TW he plays atm is pretty rare atm, and I got the idea I can understand why.
 
Does anyone know the unstrung swingweight of the sv 95?
I had three SV95s. They were all purchased at the same time and came from the same batch.

IIRC, in stock form ready to be strung, the SW were 295, 295, and 296. Stringing them with Volkl Cyclone 16 Gauge added about 30 points making them 325, 325 and 326. I also added a bit of weight and got them all up to around 328.
 

Prince Vegeta

Semi-Pro
I had three SV95s. They were all purchased at the same time and came from the same batch.

IIRC, in stock form ready to be strung, the SW were 295, 295, and 296. Stringing them with Volkl Cyclone 16 Gauge added about 30 points making them 325, 325 and 326. I also added a bit of weight and got them all up to around 328.
Thank you! I imagined it was probably 290-295. I appreciate your comment.
 
The racquet he is using here appears to have a larger hoop than the SV95.

TA DA !!! :unsure::eek:(y) ;):cool:

(Or perhaps it is just a custom SV95 with the ultron black paint job that will protect the racqet from breakage when Denis abuses them during play?)
 

CiscoPC600

Hall of Fame
The racquet he is using here appears to have a larger hoop than the SV95.

TA DA !!! :unsure::eek:(y) ;):cool:

(Or perhaps it is just a custom SV95 with the ultron black paint job that will protect the racqet from breakage when Denis abuses them during play?)
It looks the same size..


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