Denis Shapovalov to Yonex

And again, poor young Denis gets blown off the court by Cilic at Basel!

His weight of ball just does not compare. He doesn't have Wawrinka's brute strength and he doesn't have Kyrgrios's sublime timing.

The Yonex 95 simply doesn't suit his game. He would be much better to try a 98 if he wants to stick with Yonex.

Otherwise, move to something else. Sooner the better.
Or get into the gym and get a physique like Stanimal
 
He moved away from the Wilson racquet before his game really picked up which was the result of physical growth, improving fitness levels and a greater maturity on court.

Let's wait and see. I still think he will return to Wilson at some point. IMO, the 95 sq inch hoop requires too much precision and is no longer suited to the game at the elite level.

Imagine if Federer had moved to the 97 three or four years earlier than he did. He would probably have another three or four Major Titles.

You just can't argue with "Physics"!

This is contradicted by the fact that many of the elite players are using 95 sq frames. Nishikori, Djokovic, and del potro are a few examples. As well as next gen players shapovalov, tsisipas, and kyle edmund. Many of the big hitters still use the six one 95. Not only do they use 95's, but they go for the less spin friendly 18/20 pattern for maximum control. Of course, two of the GOATS - nadal and federer - did switch to larger frames in their career with the more spin friendly 16 19 pattern. Still, the lower ranked players who come through qualifying or lose in earlier rounds do almost exclusively use bigger head size of 98+.
 
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This is contradicted by the fact that many of the elite players are using 95 sq frames. Nishikori, Djokovic, and del potro are a few examples. As well as next gen players shapovalov and kyle edmund. Many of the big hitters still use the six one 95. Not only do they use 95's, but they go for the less spin friendly 18/20 pattern for maximum control. Of course, two of the GOATS - nadal and federer - did switch to larger frames in their career with the more spin friendly 16 19 pattern.

No contradiction at all.

Nishikori, Djokovic and del Potro are relatively flat hitters. So going for a larger hoop size would probably be detrimental to their games. The 18x20 pattern is ideal for flat hitters because of the control potential that string configuration offers.

Shapovalov's game is built around heavy top spin. The larger the surface area of his string bed, the easier it would be for him to hit on target shots with heavy spin. BTW, I'm very familiar with the SV95. It plays more like a 95 than a 97 even though it has an isometric shaped hoop. I still reckon he would do much better with a 97 or 98. I wonder if he tried the SV98 at all before deciding to go with the 95?

It is no secret as to why Rafa has been able to be so successful with such a heavy top spin game. It is the 100 sq inch 16x19 pattern of his Bab. sticks. I don't believe Rafa would have been anywhere near as successful using smaller hoop sizes with denser patterns. And I think Roger's renaissance is for the same reason.
 
No contradiction at all.

Nishikori, Djokovic and del Potro are relatively flat hitters. So going for a larger hoop size would probably be detrimental to their games. The 18x20 pattern is ideal for flat hitters because of the control potential that string configuration offers.

Shapovalov's game is built around heavy top spin. The larger the surface area of his string bed, the easier it would be for him to hit on target shots with heavy spin. BTW, I'm very familiar with the SV95. It plays more like a 95 than a 97 even though it has an isometric shaped hoop. I still reckon he would do much better with a 97 or 98. I wonder if he tried the SV98 at all before deciding to go with the 95?

It is no secret as to why Rafa has been able to be so successful with such a heavy top spin game. It is the 100 sq inch 16x19 pattern of his Bab. sticks. I don't believe Rafa would have been anywhere near as successful using smaller hoop sizes with denser patterns. And I think Roger's renaissance is for the same reason.
You said 95 is no longer suited for elite tennis, but elites are using them. Others are wawrinka, simon, and bautista agut. The 95 will live on with the next gen players.
 
Okay, Remind me ... Wawrinka, Simon, Bautista Agut and del Potro have won how many big tournaments in the past couple of years again?

The 95 is dead at the elite level unless the ITF changes the Rules of Tennis to outlaw hoop sizes larger than 95. Something I wish that would happen but doubt it will.

I don't see too many juniors using 95s anymore. Heck, even Shapovalov cut his teeth on a 97.

Name me one big player apart from Shapo. that is under 25 years of age that is successfully using a 95 on the Tour at the moment.
 
Okay, Remind me ... Wawrinka, Simon, Bautista Agut and del Potro have won how many big tournaments in the past couple of years again?

The 95 is dead at the elite level unless the ITF changes the Rules of Tennis to outlaw hoop sizes larger than 95. Something I wish that would happen but doubt it will.

I don't see too many juniors using 95s anymore. Heck, even Shapovalov cut his teeth on a 97.

Name me one big player apart from Shapo. that is under 25 years of age that is successfully using a 95 on the Tour at the moment.
Kyle Edmund using the six one 95. He is absolutely demolishing the ball with it and with consistency and control. Your statement needs to change. Only the supreme athletes in the pro game can use the 95. If you are a superior athlete to your opponent, you can over power him and still control the ball better with the 95. That’s what we are seeing in the modern game. Just look at Nishikori vs Khachanov match. Perfect example. He beat him with superior athleticism and ball control.
 
Kyle Edmund using the six one 95. He is absolutely demolishing the ball with it and with consistency and control. Your statement needs to change. Only the supreme athletes in the pro game can use the 95. If you are a superior athlete to your opponent, you can over power him and still control the ball better with the 95. That’s what we are seeing in the modern game. Just look at Nishikori vs Khachanov match. Perfect example. He beat him with superior athleticism and ball control.

Kyle Edmund has won ONE ATP Title. He currently has a Pro Singles record of 88 wins and 83 losses (a 51% Win Ratio). His best result at a Major Tournament is one SF at the AO, He has not gone beyond the 4th Round at any of the other Major Tournaments. He is 23yo, has been a Pro since 2011 and has won around $4 Million Dollars in prize money.

He seems like a nice guy and a very good tennis player. But the 95 is not helping him! Compare his record with Thiem or Kyrgios!

And if you want to talk about superior athletes with incredible ball control ... I refer you to a Spanish fellow named Rafael Nadal.
 

Yoneyama

Hall of Fame
No contradiction at all.

Nishikori, Djokovic and del Potro are relatively flat hitters. So going for a larger hoop size would probably be detrimental to their games. The 18x20 pattern is ideal for flat hitters because of the control potential that string configuration offers.

Shapovalov's game is built around heavy top spin. The larger the surface area of his string bed, the easier it would be for him to hit on target shots with heavy spin. BTW, I'm very familiar with the SV95. It plays more like a 95 than a 97 even though it has an isometric shaped hoop. I still reckon he would do much better with a 97 or 98. I wonder if he tried the SV98 at all before deciding to go with the 95?

It is no secret as to why Rafa has been able to be so successful with such a heavy top spin game. It is the 100 sq inch 16x19 pattern of his Bab. sticks. I don't believe Rafa would have been anywhere near as successful using smaller hoop sizes with denser patterns. And I think Roger's renaissance is for the same reason.

Just a side piece, it may not seem like it, but Nishikori's forehand rpm is one of the highest on tour - definitely not flat.
 

moon shot

Hall of Fame
how many big tournaments in the past couple of years again?

The 95 is dead at the elite level unless the ITF changes the Rules of Tennis to outlaw hoop sizes larger than 95. Something I wish that would happen but doubt it will.

I don't see too many juniors using 95s anymore. Heck, even Shapovalov cut his teeth on a 97.

Name me one big player apart from Shapo. that is under 25 years of age that is successfully using a 95 on the Tour at the moment.

  • 2 slams won, 8/16 slam quarter finalists, 3 masters won, 4 atp500 won, 7 atp250 won - in the last year with a 95.
  • The last 8 world tour finals have been won with a 95 or smaller.
  • Djokovic and half of the current top 10 still use a 95, not dead on any level.
  • Shapovalov won his Wimbledon juniors title with a 6.1 95 18x20 and played that model until he switched to Yonex.
psUODxq.jpg


Hope that helps!
 
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moon shot

Hall of Fame
Yeah, Thanks for that.

Didn't answer the most important question though!

The under 25 and juniors? I would suspect players who don’t make money tend to use a frame that is not discontinued. Probably even more true for promising juniors.

If that is a reasonable statement I think the option to use a 95 has greatly diminished in the last 8 years with the larger radical mp, pro staff, and the discontinuation of anything 96 or smaller by Yonex, Wilson, and Babolat.

In this case I think it actually is a case of correlation, at least to a certain extent.

Would Denis play better with something else? If it were bigger I think it would need to be a 18x20. He doesn’t seem to have the mindset for defensive rally point construction that lends itself to larger powerful open pattern frames. I think his game would need to change if he were to change to a larger frame.
 

stingstang

Professional
Nadal hits way too spinny. Every finalist from the last 2 majors uses a 95 for a reason. Should switch to the Phantom 93P if he wants to compete off the dirt.
 

McEncock

Professional
No contradiction at all.

Nishikori, Djokovic and del Potro are relatively flat hitters. So going for a larger hoop size would probably be detrimental to their games. The 18x20 pattern is ideal for flat hitters because of the control potential that string configuration offers.

Shapovalov's game is built around heavy top spin. The larger the surface area of his string bed, the easier it would be for him to hit on target shots with heavy spin. BTW, I'm very familiar with the SV95. It plays more like a 95 than a 97 even though it has an isometric shaped hoop. I still reckon he would do much better with a 97 or 98. I wonder if he tried the SV98 at all before deciding to go with the 95?

It is no secret as to why Rafa has been able to be so successful with such a heavy top spin game. It is the 100 sq inch 16x19 pattern of his Bab. sticks. I don't believe Rafa would have been anywhere near as successful using smaller hoop sizes with denser patterns. And I think Roger's renaissance is for the same reason.
Nishikori a flat hitter? Oh, boy. You don't have a clue. Nish has the spinnyest 2HBH of the tour, and top 10 spinnyest forehand.
Thiem uses 18x20
Shapo kills the ball with not that much of spin.
Federer used to spin the ball more with his higher SW smaller racquet.
Berasategui used to spin the ball a lot with his classic prestige 18x20 89,5 sqinch.
Why don't you try to understand instead of explaining?
 

ron schaap

Hall of Fame
Nadal hits way too spinny. Every finalist from the last 2 majors uses a 95 for a reason. Should switch to the Phantom 93P if he wants to compete off the dirt.
I believe Nadal won the French open on clay for the record breaking 11th time! Flat hitters have no businessin Paris. Later Nadal struggeled with injuries, not with hisold model apd.
 
A couple points. Some guys using bigger frames (like nadal) use a really thick gauge string to make it play with the control of a smaller frame/tighter pattern. It's hard to tell what head size a player is using on tv so we really don't know how many guys are using 95 and lower. Also, almost impossible to tell what gauge string. So a guy is using a 98 or 100 with 1.35 gauge string is not much different than a guy using and 18-20 in a 95 with 1.25.
 
I can't see many of the top players in the future using small hooped racquets.

We will see larger hooped racquets that permit much higher RPM spin rates that we see today. And this will change the game further.

Guys like Shapo are really current generation players. They are the immediate future of the game, but how many of them are using 95s? Not many!

The true Next Gen players are currently in the 14yo to 18yo age group. Many are currently playing ITF Junior Tournaments around the world. How many of them are using 95s?

In 5 years time I think current players using 95s will find younger opponents using larger hoop sizes a challenge.

But I guess we will see. I'm looking forward to it!
 
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This might have been asked in another thread, but does anyone know the weight of Shapo's racket? In other words, has he added lead tape?

A couple of posters have suggested that Shapo. is using a Base Frame Pro Stock SV95 racquet that he done customises himself.

@paulie-japan might wish to chime in regarding the static weight and balance. But I imagine it is heavier than the Retail version and probably a bit more Head Light.
 

ron schaap

Hall of Fame
  • 2 slams won, 8/16 slam quarter finalists, 3 masters won, 4 atp500 won, 7 atp250 won - in the last year with a 95.
  • The last 8 world tour finals have been won with a 95 or smaller.
  • Djokovic and half of the current top 10 still use a 95, not dead on any level.
  • Shapovalov won his Wimbledon juniors title with a 6.1 95 18x20 and played that model until he switched to Yonex.
psUODxq.jpg


Hope that helps!
No you are wrg.
Its common knowledge that Noles frames are from the Headiradical mold, which is a 98 head size. I know because i have this iradical myself. Furthermore the Williams sisters dominated the WTA with racquets bigger than100 headsize. But this is about Shapo. Let him find out for himself whats good is and whats not. Maybehegets paid by Yonex to especially play with the 95 model?
 
Shapo's not going too well at the moment. Seems to be struggling a bit. Tends to be missing a lot of shots he should be nailing, especially when he is under pressure do defend.

I still reckon he needs to try a bigger hoop to give him some wriggle room particularly when he is under the pump during important rallies. At the moment, he either hits an incredible shot or an absolute howler.
 

ron schaap

Hall of Fame

stingstang

Professional
There is no controversy, it's a fact. On the latest Prestige MP review it says "Please note: the head size is listed as 95 square inches. It is the same size as the previous Graphene XT version, which was listed as 98 square inches. The difference is based on an updated measuring method".
 
Okay, Remind me ... Wawrinka, Simon, Bautista Agut and del Potro have won how many big tournaments in the past couple of years again?

The 95 is dead at the elite level unless the ITF changes the Rules of Tennis to outlaw hoop sizes larger than 95. Something I wish that would happen but doubt it will.

I don't see too many juniors using 95s anymore. Heck, even Shapovalov cut his teeth on a 97.

Name me one big player apart from Shapo. that is under 25 years of age that is successfully using a 95 on the Tour at the moment.

Jarry h19
Rublev 6.1
Fritz radical (95?)

Next are Ivashka and Popyrin but I wouldn’t call them big.
 
Well in overall i think that most of the part of change To a large hoop is because the game now is very fast and i think that a large hoop can help they with better sweetpot and lees mishit and if they want more control put different type of tensión. Kt has reason the 2 best next gen has a hoop between 98 and 100, they helped a lot in his groundstrokes in case of tsisipas in hit clean much of the time his backhand and zverev in his sw forehand with too much backswing. So no is necesary To change To a large hoop but at least tried may can work. If the great players can do it vive you a chance but no is necesary at this moment
 

stingstang

Professional
95 isn't small - unless you hit like Sock or Nadal. OS rackets have disappeared along with mids and it seems to have settled on 95 to 100 for a while now. In reality the difference between 95 and 98 is tiny - that's why hardly any Head users even noticed! In general, a slightly larger size obviously offers a miniscule more margin for error but smaller sizes cut through the air faster and offer more control. Flex, string pattern etc is going to make a bigger difference.
 
In reality the difference between 95 and 98 is tiny - that's why hardly any Head users even noticed! In general, a slightly larger size obviously offers a miniscule more margin for error but smaller sizes cut through the air faster and offer more control. Flex, string pattern etc is going to make a bigger difference.

If you care to look, there are several articles and a few books that have been written on this subject. In many circumstances, the difference between a 95 and 98 is certainly not miniscule and the larger hoop will definitely give a player an advantage. Three immediate situations that come to mind 1/ Returning a huge serve, and 2/ Returning a ball at the extremities of reach, and 3/ Reflex volleys.

At the end of the day though, a player will usually settle on a configuration they gravitated towards in their early years. That depends on what racquets are available to them. They will develop their games with their racquet of choice and usually carry that into adulthood.

Personally, I've tried 105s, 100s, 99s, 97s, 95s, and small headed woodies over the decades. All had advantages and disadvantages. But I reckon the 97-98 is the ideal size for the high level player in the modern game.
 

ron schaap

Hall of Fame
If you care to look, there are several articles and a few books that have been written on this subject. In many circumstances, the difference between a 95 and 98 is certainly not miniscule and the larger hoop will definitely give a player an advantage. Three immediate situations that come to mind 1/ Returning a huge serve, and 2/ Returning a ball at the extremities of reach, and 3/ Reflex volleys.

At the end of the day though, a player will usually settle on a configuration they gravitated towards in their early years. That depends on what racquets are available to them. They will develop their games with their racquet of choice and usually carry that into adulthood.

Personally, I've tried 105s, 100s, 99s, 97s, 95s, and small headed woodies over the decades. All had advantages and disadvantages. But I reckon the 97-98 is the ideal size for the high level player in the modern game.
The change from 95 to 97-98 is an increase of only 3 %. From 98 to100 is only 2 % increase. So no big deal. The head size of most Heads is more elongated than the shapes of Yonex and Princes racquets. Now that is a more significant difference i think.
 
how much does pros like Shapovolov make per year from racket contract like Yonex ?

Shapovalov probably isn't being paid a lot of money from Yonex. His contract is probably for a supply of racquets and string.

There are several players using Yonex racquets on the ATP / WTA Tour. Players like Kerber, Wawrinka, Kyrgios, Nishioka and Chung and now possibly Osaka would be getting the lion's share of the Yonex money. Sharapova and Tiafoe are probably at the next level.
 

NTFIII

New User
Am surprised ALL of You can possibly have any such discussion!
Each pro uses a Pro Stock frame. They do NOT change the frame they use nor do they use a frame that is produced for the public/consumer/commercial versions. They are just painted with the same outer one paint the manufacture and the player have agreed to promote their according to their contract, which also requires that player to use those frames according to their contract.
[Examples: Look at Novak Djokovic. In early days he was used to promote the Head Prestige frames, thus his frames were painted as such. Then changed to a frame which looked and painted like a Wilson K-Blade 98 [as was Jo Wilfred Tsonga then (who uses Babolat frames most years, which ever they actually are, though different PJ)]. Then he changed back to Head using a 'New" frame look and paint of the "New" Speed line, which he continues to use a frame with that painting of the newest version. Marin Cilic has used frames painted to appear as Head Prestige [current?], Radical, Instinct. Do You actually think he has changed the frame he uses or any player?! Roger Federer began with a Wilson PS Mid 85 6.0 [the public/commercial frames were very close if not nearly the same as pro model frames]. Then in 2003 Roger began using a clearly larger head size frame of 90 s.i., painted like the PS Tour 90. Through the years of n-Code, K-Factor, BLX, Ampafeel, the frame remained to be 90 s.i. and painted like the version sold. However, the materials changed, But Roger did not change. The change of his frame to a larger 97 s.i. and slightly wider beam frame was initially completely black [as the PS frames were]. When Wilson began producing a public/commercial frame with the additional red on the middle, then Roger's frames used, also resembled these. Note also the material composition of the public/commercial frames returned to the original PS frames of Braided Graphite 80%, Kevlar 20%. This should be a significant indicator. Wilson has changed the external paint markings several times since. However, the public/commercial versions have different flex and softness ratings. Does this indicate something also? Certainly to me, none of these are what Roger actually uses either, but may have similar specifications in weight, balance, swing weight. Often look at Roger's frame to see if i can detect how thin the beam actually is. The original PS 85 was 17 mm. Most Wilson Pro Stock frames are known as H19 and H22 with variations in weighting, balance, flex, head size, shape and other characteristics. The numbers obviously correspond to the beam width. Am not certain if Wilson has other beam widths available as other manufactures, but it makes sense they do. Certainly Wilson custom shop can make what the player desires.
Yonex frames were in earlier days, also basically the same for public/commercial and pros, as were many others like Dunlop, Donnay, Kneissl, Puma, etc.
However, which exact model a player used was not certain. Look at Boris Becker who was using a Kneissl frame that looked the same as the one Ivan Lendl used [which is also was braided graphite 80%, Kevlar 20%], then changed to use a Puma frame which is clearly larger and has a different shape, feel. There was a Puma frame made for Guillermo Vilas [who Ion Tiriac was managing] then Ion became Boris Becker's manager and suggested the change for him, which he used throughout his carrier from then on. Which exact material composition [of the several public/commercial models] Boris, Ion, Puma and a few other know [various compositions: G-50%,F-50%, G-80%,K-20%, G-80%,K-10%,C[eramic]-10% (or G-70%,K-20%,C-10%, possibly more F% than G% like G30%,F-70%) (many including Yonex used G-50%,F-50%, Donnay G-80%,F-20% or K-20%, G-100%, of course Wilson, Kneissl, Dunlop, Head (*what was 'Twaron'? something of Kevlar too), Fox/Bosworth, and many others, etc. later too, like ProKennex, Gamma, Vôlkl). It is known the ESTUSA frames made for Boris were not to his liking and standard, so he continued using the Puma frames painted as the ESTUSA frames per contract. There are the issues Juan Martin Del Potro also had with his frames from Wilson, and preferred his older K-Factor painted frames, then as we have seen still uses an all black frame. Other Wilson users have been using black frames, then later with a different paint. Bjorn Borg always used a Donnay wood frame, with steel reinforcement and painted according to the contract of the year, and after getting a contract with Bancroft, to use one painted at the Bancroft Borg when playing in the USA. [Actually owned and used both of the Donnay Allwood, Borg Pro and Bancroft Borg. The two Donnay frame were the same except the paint, but the Bancroft was noticeably different in wood construction, flex, feel and performance]
So, in Conclusion. Any and every public/commercial racquet/racket frame available is NOT the frame the players actually use, though some manufactures may have public/commercial frames close to the pro frames. If You actually want a pro frame You will need to purchase one, and know which type of model and specifications You need. What Your favorite player use, may not be suitable for You, just as each one has their unique style, so are their frames.
Hope this helps as for information.
If You also want to know about other aspects, specifically the dangers and concerns of the modern, hollow, light weight, stiff frames, please research it and feel comfortable to ask me or others who know.
All The Best.
Sincerely
:)
Add: BE AWARE, BEWARE, BE WELL, BE HEALTHY!
 
I never said he was using retail. He doesn't. Yonex, like all makers, have different molds for pro players and also have custom fit options where customers can state the specs they want. It's expensive, but possible. Stan uses an older mold which he has P1 spec up for him. In don't know why but most yonex paint jobs are glossy for pro players... Maybe it's easier/cheaper to paint them that way! Or maybe it's because gloss hides the fact that they are not retail rackets better than matte!?
 

Crashbaby

Semi-Pro
I never said he was using retail. He doesn't. Yonex, like all makers, have different molds for pro players and also have custom fit options where customers can state the specs they want. It's expensive, but possible. Stan uses an older mold which he has P1 spec up for him. In don't know why but most yonex paint jobs are glossy for pro players... Maybe it's easier/cheaper to paint them that way! Or maybe it's because gloss hides the fact that they are not retail rackets better than matte!?
Hi there Paulie, I remember a post of yours where you had photos of your yonex custom SV95 with Hg on it. Is your racquet weighted up by yonex with lead tape or do you think it’s a heavier graphite layup? I’m curious because I’m wondering if it’s worth the extra expense of a yonex custom? Keen to know more about your racquet and how to obtain one.
 
Hi there Paulie, I remember a post of yours where you had photos of your yonex custom SV95 with Hg on it. Is your racquet weighted up by yonex with lead tape or do you think it’s a heavier graphite layup? I’m curious because I’m wondering if it’s worth the extra expense of a yonex custom? Keen to know more about your racquet and how to obtain one.

There was no lead anywhere on the handle or under the grommets. It was a customised frame...maybe they used a heavier weighted pin in the handle, but the colour of the foam in the handle was different to retail. It was an actual custom fit racket... Although I don't use it much. I stick to my Angell frames mostly
 

cyanide43

Rookie
Denis' racquet has to be customized to a 340s swingweight at least--no way he's doing it himself, either. Impossible for the pros to keep up and redirect pace with just stock racquets.

He uses the model that was out the year he switched from Wilson to Yonex, as Yonex does not offer special prostocks.
 

NTFIII

New User
I never said he was using retail. He doesn't. Yonex, like all makers, have different molds for pro players and also have custom fit options where customers can state the specs they want. It's expensive, but possible. Stan uses an older mold which he has P1 spec up for him. In don't know why but most yonex paint jobs are glossy for pro players... Maybe it's easier/cheaper to paint them that way! Or maybe it's because gloss hides the fact that they are not retail rackets better than matte!?

Yes, correct the pros and other sponsored people get pro stock model frames. The manufacture of them are a separate and completely different manufacturing line.
It is not just a matter of a "different mold" but different materials. The materials used are constant and do not change as the public/commercial offerings do [most changing every two years (or less) since 1999 to 2001]. This is part of the information in my reply and statements. Also within my writing, is within the same mold [like the Puma frames - and Estusa] they had different material combinations and various PJ's. Exactly which composition combination Boris used is hidden and he has not revealed neither. As for molds, sometimes the public/commercial offering are the same and the materials are [or were] the same, like the older, original Wilson PS frames. The pros had specific custom specs they requested or had done to them [like Pete Sampras' stringer states he customized Pete's frames to all be exactly the same to Pete's specs and satisfaction]. Certainly Roger, and all of the pros also do this, some maybe are more particular and sensitive than others.
The point which initiated my response was the statements or questions which current model of Yonex Denis is using.
The answer is: He is using the same frame he has been using and is painted to appear as the model his contract specifies he is endorsing. His frame does not have the materials nor composition nor specs nor necessarily the mold shape of the frame it appears, that he is required to have [per his contract].
Similarly, as Boris had issues with the frames Estusa produced [apparently with the acquired Puma molds and material compositions], it is known that Boris was not satisfied with them and used Puma made frames painted with the Estusa appearance [that was slightly different than the Puma Becker frames (which had several different PJs too; three actually].
These concepts apply to every pro frame and player.
Do the pro frames also have any of the updated compositions, material updates, additions and such?
This can only be clarified via the players and manufactures [if they will or are allowed to].
Have contact with a pro player who was previously sponsored with Vôlkl who was using Becker 11, then PB 10 and switched to Yonex some years ago now. Have asked him about this, but so far has not clarified the information.
Am actually going to contact him again, to find out if he has any previous models available, which he can sell me. [which is how my contact with him started]. Perhaps then, especially with a purchase he can or will reveal more about the frames. Am not certain, but will ask. Either way, the pro frames are more what interests me, since the materials are more classical in composition, have standard lengths longer [27.5 in] and allow for customization better too.
Am in the process of acquired more classical frames that are solid and have better weights [that most modern public players think are heavy, but are very light to me (my Yonex R-22 was a S-L [marked] (super light) = 12 oz./340g (unstrung) ) and had an actually thin beam similar to wooden frames [like most frames of then] and play much more solid, with better feel, connection to the ball, without the vibration issues of hollow frames (see Class Action Law suit)).

Hope this gives You [and others] more clarification.
All The Best and Much Success!
Sincerely,
:)
 

NTFIII

New User
Denis' racquet has to be customized to a 340s swingweight at least--no way he's doing it himself, either. Impossible for the pros to keep up and redirect pace with just stock racquets.

He uses the model that was out the year he switched from Wilson to Yonex, as Yonex does not offer special prostocks.
Are You certain Yonex does not have pro stocks?!!
Looking at many of the Yonex sponsored players it is obvious they shapes do not match exactly to public/commercial frames offered today or since they started making wider beam frames.
Many of them appear to be much thinner and of the more similar shapes of the original isometric head shapes. Though some pro frames have other isometric shapes of or similar to newer frame molds.

Am curious from where is Your information and if it is verified?
Thank You
 

NTFIII

New User
What did you just write? I could not read it, it would be helpful if you broke this up into paragraphs. But if you were telling us about PJs, we are aware.

What could You not read?
Wrote more than just about PJ's.
About a separate, completely different line of frames the pros use, which have different shape, mold, layup, materials, composition, and other specs. All the pro chooses, and rarely, if ever, changes.
The externals are just done to match the current model offered and according to their contract.
 

NTFIII

New User
This is contradicted by the fact that many of the elite players are using 95 sq frames. Nishikori, Djokovic, and del potro are a few examples. As well as next gen players shapovalov, tsisipas, and kyle edmund. Many of the big hitters still use the six one 95. Not only do they use 95's, but they go for the less spin friendly 18/20 pattern for maximum control. Of course, two of the GOATS - nadal and federer - did switch to larger frames in their career with the more spin friendly 16 19 pattern. Still, the lower ranked players who come through qualifying or lose in earlier rounds do almost exclusively use bigger head size of 98+.

You are correct, many players use 95, 97, 98 and 100 s.i frames [are there any who use less than 95: 90-95 s.i. currently?]. Do You have an accounting of all of the players and which frames they actually use?!
Seems Kyle Edmund, Stefanos Tsisipas and Denis Shapovalov are all among the younger rising players. Add the numerous others like Danill Medvedev, Alex De Minaur, Martin Klizan, Francis Tiafoe,Taylor Fritz, Mackenzie MacDonald, Rielly Opelka, Alijaz Bedene, Borna Coric, Lucas Pouille, and a long list of others from around the world. Does Grigor Dimitrov still use a 95 s.i. frame or did he actually increase to 97 also? Roger has used three frame sizes: 85 [originally], 90 [2003-], 97 [current (mid-2014?-)] s.i. of the Wilson PS, that am aware of. Does Gael Monfis still use a 95 s.i. frame too? What about Milos Raonic, John Isner, Kevin Anderson, Tomas Berdych [was also a 95 when was with Dunlop]. Jo Wilfred Tsonga, Jeremy Chardy, Gil Simon, ; their actual frame sizes? Kei Nishikori seems to clearly have continued with a 95 s.i. frame [also as per endorsement].

About the comments some have made regarding Denis [and others] with respect to physical strength related to power, though it can certainly help, the main power comes from the legs, hips and body transmitted through the arm [all of its sections; shoulder, upper arm, elbow, forearm, wrist and hand. Loading the body with energy through coil, becomes potential, then transfers to kinetic energy when released-uncoiled. More power can be achieved through these means than via adding muscle, though muscle helps certainly, not mass, but muscle strength and endurance. The proper balance many expert trainers for tennis know this and Denis has among the best at IMG he works with [for many years]. Perhaps if anyone has enough knowledge and expertise in these areas, then the players development area is a good carrier, especially for someone who also has tennis knowledge and experience too.

All The Best and Much Success!
Sincerely,
:)
 
At risk of starting up a whole new debate I will simply direct you all to the research and works of Howard Brody, Crawford Lindsey and Rod Cross.

Any tennis player generates kinetic energy up to a maximum level. The tennis racquet does NOT generate power. The tennis racquet can only redirect the kinetic energy from the incoming ball and rebound it back into the ball. The different specifications of the actual tennis racquet and the string bed will affect the efficiency of the rebound.

So Denis might reach his physical peak and achieve maximum level of kinetic energy when released-uncoiled. But you cannot argue with the known Laws of Physics. If Denis uses a stiffer racquet with a larger hoop size, he will achieve a higher level of rebound energy and will generate more powerful balls.

Using an SV95 is a compromise that defers to receiving sponsorship money from Yonex. It is the same for most other players.

Roger Federer did not have to make that compromise. He has plenty of money already and was chasing Results. He did not magically find some more power from his body. If anything his body is producing less power as he ages. So he went to a larger hoop size to help him.

The future of the game is bigger hoops sizes for a multitude of reasons. If Denis doesn't go to a bigger hoop, he will remain stuck where he is and will be overtaken by the next batch of upcoming players who have developed their games with stiffer racquets and 100 sq inch hoop sizes.
 

anfield

Semi-Pro
If Denis doesn't go to a bigger hoop, he will remain stuck where he is and will be overtaken by the next batch of upcoming players who have developed their games with stiffer racquets and 100 sq inch hoop sizes.

If you think Shapo's main issue is his racquet, I don't know what sport you watch. The main issue, as with most of us, is between the ears. He's just too anxious and puppy-like, he just needs to mature a bit. Also, the SV95 plays a lot bigger, some say like a 97," and it's also quite powerful. I'd say he'd be better off with the VCP 97 330 to rein in his game some.
 
If you think Shapo's main issue is his racquet, I don't know what sport you watch. The main issue, as with most of us, is between the ears. He's just too anxious and puppy-like, he just needs to mature a bit. Also, the SV95 plays a lot bigger, some say like a 97," and it's also quite powerful. I'd say he'd be better off with the VCP 97 330 to rein in his game some.

I watch Tennis! Shapo's main problem is his racquet. He is using a small headed racquet with a SW in the 340s. That is a recipe for disaster with his SHBH.

Shapo loses a significant amount of points due to errors on his BH side. But because he nails the BH every now and again, a lot of people get sucked in to thinking it is a weapon. Just look at the stats though. It is not the case. His FH is actually more reliable than his BH even though it doesn't look like it.

Anyone who thinks the SV95 plays bigger than a standard 95 has never used a leaded up SV95. The SV95 plays like a 95. Forget the isometric hoop, look at the actual string bed.

The SV95 is powerful if the ball is hit cleanly. Problem is, it is difficult to hit the ball cleanly every shot. And any off centre impacts end up being very weak and sit up for the opponent to put away. Again watch Shapo's matches. Happens a lot. (It's either All or Nothing!)

Imo, Shapo would certainly improve with a larger hoop. It would give him a larger margin for error and allow him to maintain more consistent stroke rhythm. Result would be a lot less errors especially on his BH.
 

McEncock

Professional
Gasquet may be an exception, but all the greatest back-handers OH or 2H have always had better forehand stats ; because no matter how good your BH is, FH is an easier shot. Your stat about Shapo tells... Nothing. Look at Wawrinky's stats and racquet. Btw, very strange racquet headsize debate, as the world of men's tennis is dominated by 95 sq inch pt113B.
 
Gasquet may be an exception, but all the greatest back-handers OH or 2H have always had better forehand stats ; because no matter how good your BH is, FH is an easier shot.

Edberg, Rosewall, Connors and Budge would probably disagree with you.

Btw, very strange racquet headsize debate, as the world of men's tennis is dominated by 95 sq inch pt113B.

Hmmm, over the past 15 years, the world of Men's Tennis has been dominated by Federer and Nadal. Nadal uses 100. Federer did use 90 and 95. But continued to dominate with a 97. And even he suggests that he probably would have been even more successful if he had moved to the 97 years earlier than he did.

I don't thing the world of Men's tennis is going to be dominated by 95s for much longer though. Just wait and see. (And may I add, the actual hoop size is only part of the equation. The density of the string pattern is also relevant. What is the string pattern density of the PT113B?)
 
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