Difference between topspin on FH vs 2HBH?

Wuppy

Professional
Try as I might, I can't get nearly the same amount of topspin on my two-handed backhand as I can on my forehand.

Is this normal? :confused:
 

user92626

G.O.A.T.
Yeah, quite normal. :) 2hbh is quite limited in extension and range. It's very hard to rotate your body fast with both hands on one side (lack of the balance that FH has) without fear of losing balance and spinning out of control.
 

GuyClinch

Legend
Of course a 2HBH is much like a 'traditional' forehand - you can't add in the WW effect..and you finish over your shoulder.
 

BevelDevil

Hall of Fame
hmm... I'm guessing that an open-stance 2hbh has more topspin potential than the closed/neutral 2hbh. So maybe you should try hitting more from the open stance.
 

ace_pace

Rookie
Yeah its normal. Proven by Nadal himself. If he could get the same amount of topspin from his forehand to his backhand, he'd be even harder to beat on clay.

user92626 pretty much sums it up why. Also the reason why 2hbh is usually weaker than the forehand. Hence a 1hbh can in fact have more power and spin at the cost of overall consistency.
 

mikeler

Moderator
I hit with both a 1 hander and 2 hander at the moment. The 1 hander gives me much more spin, just the way it is.
 

1HBH Rocks

Semi-Pro
Try as I might, I can't get nearly the same amount of topspin on my two-handed backhand as I can on my forehand.

Is this normal? :confused:
It's an issue of range of motion... Typically, two handed backhands are hit a lot more flat, although you can still loop it a ton if you get it right. But, players who have a two handed backhand tend to outlast their forehand with it (it's more consistent) while not hitting nearly as many winners -- and not nearly as many as a one handed backhand player would be hitting.

Having two hands on the racket makes it difficult to get your wrist joints involved in producing topspin, unlike with a one handed stroke such as most people's forehand.

Here, Nadal court level and, the second one, Nadal at super-slow-motion.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6cdQLPbxcpk
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j86FuSXtWUM
 

Wuppy

Professional
Thanks for the good responses guys, glad to know it's not just me. And yes I use a more closed stance so mabey I'll try an open-stance 2HBH, although that seems fairly difficult. I see lots of WTA players use a more open stance on their 2HBH. In fact it seems like the women pros often have better 2HBHs than the male players.
 

Nellie

Hall of Fame
Soften your wrist. Most players are too stiff on the backhand side - you are not trying to whack a baseball.

Try hitting some topspin lobs from the backhand side - with exaggerated spin and arch. I find this helps because you will stay loose and get used to hitting low to high.
 
I think this is mostly because the 2 handed grip limits the range of motion in the wrists. thus generally the swing plane is flatter on a 2 hander
 

5263

G.O.A.T.
It's normal to have less spin with the 2 hander, but
not necessary. I've seen guys with exceptional TS on their 2 hander.
I think most of the reasons listed here are guesses, especially since
it's wrong and can be done. Just not the norm.
 

Limpinhitter

G.O.A.T.
Of course a 2HBH is much like a 'traditional' forehand - you can't add in the WW effect..and you finish over your shoulder.
You can add a WW finish, Nadal does sometimes. But, not to the same degree as with a forehand. You just don't have the flexibility with two hands on the racquet. OTOH, you can drive the ball better with a good 2hb, IMO.
 

Limpinhitter

G.O.A.T.
Thanks for the good responses guys, glad to know it's not just me. And yes I use a more closed stance so mabey I'll try an open-stance 2HBH, although that seems fairly difficult. I see lots of WTA players use a more open stance on their 2HBH. In fact it seems like the women pros often have better 2HBHs than the male players.
IMO, a neutral stance is optimal for a 2hb, an open stance is needed when you don't have time to set up in a neurtral stance, a closed stance works best when hitting on the run, parallel to the baseline.
 

LeeD

Bionic Poster
Whatever stance you choose, your leverage is LESS with 2hbh than one, so you always lose some power/speed/spin using a shorter lever.
At lower levels, some 2hbh's can be stronger and more consistent than forehands. However, at a better than 5 level, the 1hfh is always more powerful and consistent.
 

sportsfan1

Hall of Fame
You may want to check if you are really dropping your hands/wrists before starting your upward swing. Check into videos of Djok/Murray.
 

1HBH Rocks

Semi-Pro
Thanks for the good responses guys, glad to know it's not just me. And yes I use a more closed stance so mabey I'll try an open-stance 2HBH, although that seems fairly difficult. I see lots of WTA players use a more open stance on their 2HBH. In fact it seems like the women pros often have better 2HBHs than the male players.
Depends on the player, but I would bet the less aggressive context of play helps a lot making it look good. I wouldn't trade Murray's, Djokovic's or Nadal's backhand for that of any women on the WTA, for one.
 

1HBH Rocks

Semi-Pro
Whatever stance you choose, your leverage is LESS with 2hbh than one, so you always lose some power/speed/spin using a shorter lever.
At lower levels, some 2hbh's can be stronger and more consistent than forehands. However, at a better than 5 level, the 1hfh is always more powerful and consistent.
You can't translate these ideas into bio-mechanics like that. Your body generates energy, not speed; getting the thing moving further away from your body also demands more energy. And, for your information, levers are computed with loads... levers multiply loads, not speed. If you want to talk about how a rigid turning object must cover the same angle regardless of the distance from the axis, that's an other story, but realize that the further you get, the harder it is to make it move. The bottom line is you won't miraculously create energy. All you can do is find positions in which your joints can better benefit from your muscular action and that's it.

As for your assertion on the forehand and backhand, it's also false. At the pro level, two handed backhands are typically more consistent than one handed forehands. Pros make fewer mistakes with it, but they also tend to hit less winners. Besides, for some players, the backhand is still their best shot.
 
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