Different tension -- any point?

anirut

Legend
Just wondering ...

Is there any point in stringing mains and crosses of SAME string at different tensions?

e.g. Stringing syn gut mains at 56 and the very syn gut crosses at 58. This, of course, is a two-piece string job.

In this case, would the resultant feel be something like a 1-piece job at 57? Would there be any other benefit to this?

Thanks.
 

TenniseaWilliams

Professional
You could make the argument that the mains don't move as much with higher cross tension, and on flexible frames +2-4 lbs on the crosses makes the final (unmounted) head measure closer to unstrung.

Proponents of lower cross tension claim it increases the size of the sweet spot. Maybe we could get TW university to test that.

The amount of stiffness that it adds is probably proportional to the amount of head flexibility, and possibly dependent on the string. Very little frame elongation could make a poly mains a lot stiffer.
 
mostly, people string crosses higher by 2-4 lbs to stop main stings movement. also, stringing the crosses lower/higher can change the stiffness feeling lower/higher, respectively
 

anirut

Legend
Thanks for the responses.

So, other than preventing string movement and getting the "feel" that one likes, are there other benefits too? Like longer string life or something?

In a hybrid, say poly & multi, yes, I'd understand the reasons. But for the same string type, I'm lost.
 

TenniseaWilliams

Professional
Maybe off-topic, but have you ever tried the Jay Cee 2 piece method? The crosses are +4, outer mains +8, finishes the mains on the bottom crosses. One of its claims is longer tension maintenance.
 
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