Djokovic News

Djokovic2011

Bionic Poster
Good to see Earth's Mightiest have some much needed rest after a tough campaign in Australia, winning both the ATP Cup and AO. Hopefully see him back in action in Dubai. (y)
I really hope he sticks to playing Dubai this year. I think one of the reasons he did so poorly in IW/Miami last year was that he took too long a break after winning the AO - 6+ weeks without playing a professional match is too much and can lead to rustiness, even if you are the best player in the world.
 

Enceladus

Hall of Fame
Looks like they are all there...



Can't wait for Dubai LOL. He got me excited after ATP Cup and AO.
Good to see Earth's Mightiest have some much needed rest after a tough campaign in Australia, winning both the ATP Cup and AO. Hopefully see him back in action in Dubai. (y)
I'm glad Novak will play the ATP 500 tournament before Sunshine Double, Djoker's absence from last year in Dubai / Acapulco hurt his results at IW & Miami.

If Djoker wins Dubai, Dubai will become the 8th tournament where Nole has won at least 5 titles!
Djoker has won at least 5 titles on the this tournaments:
  1. Australian Open - 8 titles (historic record at AO)
  2. Beijing, Miami - 6 titles (Beijing - record; Miami - shared record with Andre Agassi)
  3. Wimbledon, ATP Finals, Indian Wells, Paris-Bercy - 5 titles (IW - shared record with Roger Federer; Bercy - record)
 

Enceladus

Hall of Fame
In honor of Novak, a new giant poster was exposed in Serbia:

New title, new giant poster for Novak: The sun shines on the champion, it never shines like this!

A new large poster was placed in honor of our ace on the building where the family restaurant Djokovic is located.

It has become a tradition that Djokovic's greatest successes are followed and weeped in his honor, more precisely giant posters that change as needed on the building that houses the restaurant owned by the family of our best tennis player.

Every Grand Slam trophy that Novak won was that way celebrated, and this was the eighth title in Melbourne.

These days the old poster has been removed and the new one has been mounted as another symbol of Novak's tremendous success.

It features Novak's character in the Australian Open victorious lane and a number that fits perfectly - number one!

The sun was the perfect match for the giant picture, our champion shone ...
 

Djokodalerer31

Hall of Fame
There is a difference between "respect" and "like".
He gets neither pal! The way he is treated by the media, Kyrgios and most of the people posting here is some bizarre and perverted showcase of respect i have ever seen for anyone and from anyone!...And i have seen a lot...
People say - he is boring, he wants to be liked too much, he isclown and pretender, he is abuser and psycho and so on...thats only asmall fraction of what i read from around these threads...so thats how you "respect" someone?! Maybe its you people, who mix up the terms?! Maybe you have to be corrected, because there is also a difference between "acknowledgement of one's achievements" and "respect"...because latter by defaults commands some sort of accolades and invalidates (or at least minimizes critique!...) He is neither respected, nor liked! He is just acknowledged and thats it...
 

swordtennis

G.O.A.T.
He gets neither pal! The way he is treated by the media, Kyrgios and most of the people posting here is some bizarre and perverted showcase of respect i have ever seen for anyone and from anyone!...And i have seen a lot...
People say - he is boring, he wants to be liked too much, he isclown and pretender, he is abuser and psycho and so on...thats only asmall fraction of what i read from around these threads...so thats how you "respect" someone?! Maybe its you people, who mix up the terms?! Maybe you have to be corrected, because there is also a difference between "acknowledgement of one's achievements" and "respect"...because latter by defaults commands some sort of accolades and invalidates (or at least minimizes critique!...) He is neither respected, nor liked! He is just acknowledged and thats it...
I think the word we are looking for to describe it is "pathological".
 

Nole Slam

Semi-Pro
In honor of Novak, a new giant poster was exposed in Serbia:

New title, new giant poster for Novak: The sun shines on the champion, it never shines like this!

A new large poster was placed in honor of our ace on the building where the family restaurant Djokovic is located.

It has become a tradition that Djokovic's greatest successes are followed and weeped in his honor, more precisely giant posters that change as needed on the building that houses the restaurant owned by the family of our best tennis player.

Every Grand Slam trophy that Novak won was that way celebrated, and this was the eighth title in Melbourne.

These days the old poster has been removed and the new one has been mounted as another symbol of Novak's tremendous success.

It features Novak's character in the Australian Open victorious lane and a number that fits perfectly - number one!

The sun was the perfect match for the giant picture, our champion shone ...
I was in that restaurant once. Saw Djokovic's father. He stared at me like he wanted to kick me out. Probably because I just ordered a drink, but as a restaurant, ordering food was required there. I also wasn't dressed for the occasion.
 

Doctor/Lawyer Red Devil

Talk Tennis Guru
Federer is always Federer, Nadal is always Nadal, but Djokovic can be both Federer and Nadal

The well known American columnist wrote an article in which he talked about the wonder known as Novak Djokovic.



In this text the American wrote about how he saw the Australian Open final where the Serbian defeated Dominic Thiem.

Posnanski, 53, used to write for Sports Illustrated, NBC... He earned many journalist awards, and now he is a journalist for Atletico while also writing for his JoeBlogs blog.

In his newest blog the American dedicated big part of his work to the current world number 1.

The wonder of Novak

When Novak Djokovic was a young and still erratic player, he became somewhat famous around the tennis circuit for his tennis impressions. He could basically impersonate any player’s service motion, forehand, backhand, mannerisms between points etc. — Federer, Nadal, Williams, Graf, Sampras, McEnroe, you name it.

You might not expect that to be much of an act, but it was pretty funny. Djokovic even then had such a keen eye for detail and such a unique ability to physically take on the form of other players that it was surprisingly good. Great players were known to watch his impersonations and then say out loud, “Do I really do that?”

Eventually, he stopped doing it — publicly at least — because some people got offended by it.

Anyway, this picture of Djokovic doing tennis impressions came to mind two Sundays ago when he beat Dominic Thiem in five grueling and somewhat odd sets at the Australian Open.

First, there is something to be said about Thiem, who comes ever closer to finally breaking through not only for himself but for his entire lost generation of tennis players. Thiem has become an extraordinary player who, at his best, can blast anyone, including the Big Three, off the court with his serve, his ferocious forehand, his savage backhand down the line. He lost in straight sets to Rafael Nadal at the 2018 French Open, in four sets to Nadal at the 2019 French Open and in five sets to Djokovic in the 2020 Australian Open. The breakthrough does seem near.



But not yet. No, the story again was Djokovic and there is history to be discussed.

This was Djokovic’s eighth Australian Open championship, which is a record (but, then again, so was seven Australian Open titles). As far as the grand slam thing goes, Djoker now has 17, Rafael Nadal has 19, and Roger Federer has 20. That race gets tighter. The three of them have won the last 13 grand slams, and Nadal will, of course, be favored to win in Paris, and Federer seems to have at least enough magic left to make another run at Wimbledon.*

*Their domination simply cannot be overstated.

— The three of them have won 14 of the last 15 Australian Opens.

— The three of them have won the last 14 of the last 15 French Opens.

— The three of them have won 15 of the last 17 Wimbledons.

— The three of them have won 12 of the last 16 U.S. Opens.


Djokovic has the wind at his back now. He is younger than Roger and Rafa, and he still seems to be finding higher levels. The three-way conversation about the greatest ever tennis player is fun but ultimately futile — they each have their case and their fans will not let go. Federer got there first, set the bar for tennis genius, and is regularly called “GOAT” by his competitors. Nadal brought a new force into the game, he owned Federer for most of their careers, and he is inarguably the most dominant clay-court player in the game’s history.

And Djokovic? He came along third, after the other two had framed the argument, but he is the only one of the four to have held all four titles at the same time, he is 13-6 in finals against Federer, he is 15-11 in finals against Nadal (including the only straight-set victory Rafa ever suffered in a Grand Slam final), and he has every chance (and every intention) of winning the most grand slam titles by the time he’s finally done.

He has a chance, statistically and logically, to make the argument his and his alone.



There is something more tangible, though, that I noticed about Djokovic as he plodded his way through that five-set match against Thiem: It seems to me that Djoker, unlike Roger or Rafa, has the ability to become someone else on the tennis court.

That is to say, Roger Federer is always Roger Federer. He spots his serve like no one ever has. He moves with such perfect rhythms, it’s as much like dancing as tennis. His forehand can end points from anywhere in the stadium, in the later stages of his career he turned his backhand into its own gorgeous weapon, and nobody commands the net like he does. He does surprising things — tweeners between the legs, no-look shots into the open court, drop shots that land and sink into the ground — but he himself is never surprising.

Rafael Nadal is always Rafael Nadal. He plays every point like it is his last. He makes his opponent hit three, five, eight balls that would be winners against almost anyone else. He hits his shots with such vicious topspin that each one must feel like a boxer’s body blow, and he attacks moments of weakness like few ever have. He grunts and sweats and plods and opponents know that he will never stop, never, and that might just be the scariest feeling in sports.

It is nothing but a compliment to say that they are who they are.



But Djokovic is different, He — more than the other two, more than any player in this game’s long history, I would argue — is amorphous, adaptable, variable. He changes from point to point. The great tennis impressionist transforms before your very eyes.

He can play some of Federer’s game — twice in the match against Thiem, he faced a break point that, had he lost, probably would have cost him the match. Both times, he served and volleyed. “That not really what I do,” he said after the match ended, except that it is what he does when the time is right. He is a genius at the net when the situation calls for it. He loves facing his opponent just on the other side of the next, two of them barely 10 feet apart, in a game of quick-draw.

He can play Nadal’s game — sometimes, against Thiem, he just stood a few feet behind the baseline and chased down anything and everything Thiem smashed at him. It was awe-inspiring to see him return fire until Thiem, mentally exhausted, deeply frustrated, tried a shot that even he did not quite have the talent to pull off.

He can be offensive or defensive. He can punch or counter punch. He can beat you with his serve, he can beat you with his return. Djokovic also has his own game — the closest thing he has to a tangible style — where he returns serves right at your feet, takes hold of the point, never lets it go, moves you from side to side to side to side until you wilt.

He has so many choices of what kind of tennis player he can be — I sometimes wonder if this is at the heart of the frustrations he often shows on the court. Numerous times a match, Djokovic will look up to his coaching box, not for emotional support but to complain about something that doesn’t easily or obviously connect to the action.



“Why is he screaming at them?” you will think after an opponent hits a winner against him or when he hits a shot just wide.

My best guess, much of the time, is that he’s complaining about the persona and his team had chosen, as if to say, “Well, if I knew he was going to play like THIS I would have been someone different today.”

During the Thiem match, Djokovic had a brief and inexplicable loss of energy. He still doesn’t know what happened exactly. He won the first set with his usual breathless tennis, and the second set was 4-4 when he had a bit of a meltdown and got broken — it didn’t help that he was given two time-violations by a perhaps overzealous chair umpire. He promptly lost six games in a row and his shots lost all their shape and power. He did not look angry. He looked beaten.

When Djokovic was young, at the same time he was famous for his impersonations, he would occasionally lose energy and flat give up. He did this once against Federer, who held it against him for a long time. But Djokovic evolved like few athletes ever have. He went vegan, became something of a fitness nut, hardened his mind, and became utterly ruthless. People call Rafa the great warrior, and he is, but it is Djokovic who has the better five-set record now at 30-10 (Nadal is at 22-12).

And so Djokovic found his energy and found himself — or more to the point found who he needed to be — and he took the fourth set, and then he got his service break in the fifth set and he calmly and professionally served it out. Thiem does get closer. Young players like Alexander Zverev and Stefanos Tsitsipas and Daniil Medvedev surely will have their day. Nadal and Federer each have life left in them.

But until further notice, it is Novak Djokovic’s world and will remain so until someone can summon a game he cannot counter.
 

Doctor/Lawyer Red Devil

Talk Tennis Guru
"Novak is already the best in history for me"

Former Wimbledon champion Goran Ivanisevic said that Novak Djokovic is a perfectionist and that all shots must be perfect, even in training.



Retired player from Split, who is part of Novak's team since last year's Wimbledon, revealed in big interview for "Jutarnji" how they work together.

Goran remembered his first encounter with Novak, in Nikola Pilic's academy in Munich.

"I will never forget when I played Novak the first time, when he was 14,5 years old and when Niko told me: 'Listen, I will cut my balls if this boy doesn't become number one'. And you can really see that. There are children who play well, and there are children who have 'something'. You can't buy that, you either have it or you don't. That separates champions like Novak from someone who will be 20th or 30th. Novak is a person who always wants something new, and I have never seen that psyche before. That's what adorns him and what makes him the greatest for me. And what he will still show at all the tournaments he will win and the records he will break. If you look at the last ten years, nobody comes close to him", says Ivanisevic.

Goran said that he got a lot of advice from Marian Vajda and Miljan Amamovic in the beginning, and he revealed how does the training look like when they are all together.

"We rarely have different ideas. Marian and me are always on the same wavelength, only Novak is occasionally unsatisfied with some shot even when we think there is no reason for that. But, he is the one on the court, and until he isn't happy, we can talk what's not good. For example, recently in Australia before his match against Raonic he tells us that his return is bad, that he isn't satisfied. Now I look: Where is the problem? Then we caught Karlovic, who was still there, to warm him up the day before. And Novak returned his serves like Karlo is serving 500 meters away. He was satisfied, but not completely. And then he played Raonic and returns amazing against a man who serves 220, 230 kph. Novak is a perfectionist and until the moment when he feels all the shots how he imagined, he is not satisfied", added Ivanisevic.

He also explained how Djokovic looks at certain details.

"Maybe he sees some details differently than Marian and me. It's fascinating how much he follows tennis. In the middle of the night he remembers something and sends us a message asking did we see that. For example, prior to the final against Thiem he watched how when he throws the ball to the left, he serves wide, while when he throws it to the right, he serves down the T. And he wants to be sure in every detail, so he doesn't miss anything that might cost him. He unbelievably follows tennis, he compares previous matches... We watched Thiem and Zverev and already looking at all the scenario, what if this guy wins, what if that guy wins. We are sitting during dinner, joking around, but we are already in the match", says Ivanisevic who believes that Djokovic has another five good seasons in him.

Ivanisevic also spoke about Novak's race for the records.

"He could pass Federer's weeks at number one already after the US Open, while Grand Slams next year. He can tie him this year for which he would need to win the remaining three. But if he wins all three, then he would again achieve something only Laver did. I repeat, for me he is already the best player in history. When he is present, ready and healthy, there is nobody better than him. People will decide which things will be looked at when they finish their careers, but I think that Novak will be the best in all important categories", Ivanisevic is clear.
 

uscwang

Hall of Fame
"Novak is already the best in history for me"

Former Wimbledon champion Goran Ivanisevic said that Novak Djokovic is a perfectionist and that all shots must be perfect, even in training.



Retired player from Split, who is part of Novak's team since last year's Wimbledon, revealed in big interview for "Jutarnji" how they work together.

Goran remembered his first encounter with Novak, in Nikola Pilic's academy in Munich.

"I will never forget when I played Novak the first time, when he was 14,5 years old and when Niko told me: 'Listen, I will cut my balls if this boy doesn't become number one'. And you can really see that. There are children who play well, and there are children who have 'something'. You can't buy that, you either have it or you don't. That separates champions like Novak from someone who will be 20th or 30th. Novak is a person who always wants something new, and I have never seen that psyche before. That's what adorns him and what makes him the greatest for me. And what he will still show at all the tournaments he will win and the records he will break. If you look at the last ten years, nobody comes close to him", says Ivanisevic.

Goran said that he got a lot of advice from Marian Vajda and Miljan Amamovic in the beginning, and he revealed how does the training look like when they are all together.

"We rarely have different ideas. Marian and me are always on the same wavelength, only Novak is occasionally unsatisfied with some shot even when we think there is no reason for that. But, he is the one on the court, and until he isn't happy, we can talk what's not good. For example, recently in Australia before his match against Raonic he tells us that his return is bad, that he isn't satisfied. Now I look: Where is the problem? Then we caught Karlovic, who was still there, to warm him up the day before. And Novak returned his serves like Karlo is serving 500 meters away. He was satisfied, but not completely. And then he played Raonic and returns amazing against a man who serves 220, 230 kph. Novak is a perfectionist and until the moment when he feels all the shots how he imagined, he is not satisfied", added Ivanisevic.

He also explained how Djokovic looks at certain details.

"Maybe he sees some details differently than Marian and me. It's fascinating how much he follows tennis. In the middle of the night he remembers something and sends us a message asking did we see that. For example, prior to the final against Thiem he watched how when he throws the ball to the left, he serves wide, while when he throws it to the right, he serves down the T. And he wants to be sure in every detail, so he doesn't miss anything that might cost him. He unbelievably follows tennis, he compares previous matches... We watched Thiem and Zverev and already looking at all the scenario, what if this guy wins, what if that guy wins. We are sitting during dinner, joking around, but we are already in the match", says Ivanisevic who believes that Djokovic has another five good seasons in him.

Ivanisevic also spoke about Novak's race for the records.

"He could pass Federer's weeks at number one already after the US Open, while Grand Slams next year. He can tie him this year for which he would need to win the remaining three. But if he wins all three, then he would again achieve something only Laver did. I repeat, for me he is already the best player in history. When he is present, ready and healthy, there is nobody better than him. People will decide which things will be looked at when they finish their careers, but I think that Novak will be the best in all important categories", Ivanisevic is clear.
Amazing stuff. I suspect though Federer and Nadal are both like that.
 

Enceladus

Hall of Fame
Interview with Jelena for Serbian publication Vesti. In an interview, Jelena explained the reasons why she don't travel with Nole to his matches anymore.

Translated with help of Google translate:
He is the most famous Serb on the planet and proved last week in Australia that he is the number one tennis player in the world, but his wife also proves, that behind every successful man is a successful woman. Jelena Djokovic is Chief Operating Officer of the Novak Djokovic Foundation, which has opened 44 kindergartens in Serbia and has received a remarkable $ 9.8 million in donations from 8,000 charities around the world in less than 10 years.

Sow joy


In an exclusive interview for News, Jelena Djokovic reveals the secrets of the “success” of humanitarian work, comments on the great support for the diaspora she and Novak Djokovic receive wherever they are, but also reveals how she watches her husband's tennis matches when away.

Q - The beginning of the year is the moment when the previous results are summarized. What was it like for the 2019 Foundation?

Jelena - I am proud of everything the whole team has done not only during the past year, but also all previous ones. In all the areas we focused on, we have achieved remarkable results, with children, early development and early education still at the forefront. At the end of September we opened our 44th kindergarten in Svilajnac. It is a beautiful facility and I believe that many people in this place in Serbia will now be much nicer and easier to go to school. In fact, summarizing these 13 years of work, I can only be fulfilled and proud to have built together the whole childhood kingdom of dreams and love, bringing back the smiles of thousands of toddlers and their families, helping them have a more beautiful childhood and giving the wind back with greater faith and courage to move to a better future.

Q - Have you just opened your first kindergarten exactly 10 years ago in Ljig?

Jelena - Exactly. I still remember very clearly how excited I was that day. And believe me, to this day with the same enthusiasm and love, I look forward to every new kindergarten we opened through Serbia! Our dream is to help our children as much as possible so that they are not lagging behind small children in other European countries. We also create a stimulating educational environment to succeed. We have great help from kindergarten staff, great educators who are dedicated to children. That is why we try to integrate them through education and training programs. To date, more than 1,500 teachers have passed these programs and 25,000 children are enrolled.

"Schools of Life"

Q - What are the Foundation's key goals for 2020?

Jelena - Our basic mission remains this year, but also in the coming years, namely the opening of kindergartens in rural parts of Serbia in order to reach as many children who unfortunately do not attend pre-school facilities. All research has shown that enrollment in preschool facilities gives children much more stability, safety, and ultimately, to a much smaller percentage, will later turn into the wrong streets. If we know that the number of children is decreasing with a negative rate of population growth, we must save every child for the future. We will continue to invest in projects that will continue after our donations. First, this is what I mean by the "schools of life".

Q - Are there any recipes for subsequent humanitarian work?

Jelena - Hmm, another question! When you say humanitarian work, you first think about money and donation. Of course, it is not possible to realize the project without funding, but a functioning humanitarian organization requires a good team of people, altruists, who want to give up many things to help others. You have to believe and work hard because the clearer the goal is, the better the results. Today, technology has allowed us to connect no matter where we live and work, making it easier to animate the community. On the other hand, it is important to have your hand at sea or at the right address.

Q - How many people do they give or have for most of them to present the project?

Jelena - Here I would return to the same number of our foundation. Unanimously, our maternity department is ironed and helps those who receive whitening assistance. The foundation worked in the form of individual applications and financial assistance from Djokovic's family. Ten years later, besides our personal gifts, we have the help and trust of people around the world who identify with the Foundation's mission. Donations worth at least $ 8,000 are set at nearly $ 9.8 million, allowing us to talk about the modesty of our people donating.


It contradicts forms

Q - You are in the spotlight with your husband, domestic and international. How much large is this attention and how much distracts from “normal life”?

Jelena - It is certain that when you are young, the headlights and attention will come on, because the experience at the first moment does not bother you that it can bring some difficulties. We look at public figures and think that such publicity is fine. But as time goes by, you even lack anonymity, lack privacy to do whatever you like at any time and in any edition. I try to resist all these expectations to always be myself and for Novak to be able to be himself. That is probably why I am being criticised by the public ‘why didn't I wear makeup’ or ‘why wasn't I always wearing heels’. But I decided that between the way I see and love myself and what the public expects, I choose not to disappoint myself."

Q - You don't fit into templates. You could easily play the role of a “successful household” and still work and achieve significant results. Don't like the "easy way"?

Jelena - Why does one role have to rule out another? I found that both roles are very important in a woman's life. I will always focus on my family up to the last atom of energy, but I also have a very clear list of priorities in terms of business commitments. Both Novak's and my mother worked and took care of the family, so I think our children should have a role model. Only by work can we achieve our goals.

Q - Mostly you are spared the headlines in the "yellow print". How are you doing it?

Jelena - The times we live in with the development of technology and social networks have contributed to making the life of the public available at all times. I am aware that as a wife of a popular athlete I might be interested in the yellow press and therefore I try not to give titles too much.

Recipe for happiness

Q - You are aware that Diaspora adores you and Novak. Can you reveal some of the most memorable encounters with Serbs around the world? When did you and Novák surprise or laugh at tears?

Jelena - We are happy to meet our people wherever Novak plays tournaments. This support means to him because he likes it when he has his fans on the stands, when he sees our flag. This was also seen in Australia at the ATP Cup, which apparently played in the middle of Serbia. The atmosphere was amazing. I would also mention Srbikos from Paris, a group of tennis fans who regularly come to Roland Garros and the champions in Bercy. Much support comes from Indian Wells tournaments, where many of our people come from Los Angeles and surrounding cities. There are more tournaments where Novak meets Serbs like Dubai or Qatar, as well as competitions in China or Japan. Thank you all, it's a privilege to have such fans.

Q - Have you played tennis yourself but don't want to comment on the tournament results?

Jelena - I was a kid when I was playing tennis. I loved sports, but somehow school was always my priority. Over time, I realized that I would not be able to achieve remarkable achievements in tennis, and I devoted more time to learning and to the book. I believe I am not relevant enough to comment on Novak's struggles in some way. Of course we are talking about everything, even that part of his life. When he asks me for an opinion, I'm happy to tell him what I think, but he's the one who decides with the team on the pitch. I focus more on the education of our children, the Foundation's activities, and the numerous projects that follow the Novák brand. We both found our recipe for happiness, we made a good balance, arranged and arranged nicely, which is not easy given the intensity of his duties.

Q - Is it harder to be in the box or watch his matches from home?

Jelena - Both are equally difficult. You know how much effort, work, energy, desire, time and everything you have devoted to every struggle, point, and when you look at what is happening from this perspective, of course you don't care. But when I think about it, it's much nicer to be at home watching the matches because I'm here with Stefan and Tara, and then we all cheered together in our own way, we can relax, scream, sing, laugh.

Continuation of the interview in the next message.
 
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Enceladus

Hall of Fame
Continuation of the interview with Jelena:
Generous diaspora

Q - The Serbian diaspora proves that it has a great heart. Do you think how you charge for this help and how they can get involved?

Jelena - For 13 years of the Foundation, our people living abroad are our unique support and sincere partners. They showed their great heart whenever it was needed. We received specific support from each of our calls, but also friendly messages that we are not alone. Therefore, I would like to take this opportunity to thank all the humane diaspora people for their good deeds for helping us to give our children a better and happier childhood. I thank them for encouraging the development of giving culture because it has nothing to do with people's wealth. So that Burma is not on top. Learning to man today is as important as acquiring many other qualities, and we must learn from each other.

Gift season

Q - Do donors look for something in return, from knowing you and Novak to souvenirs?

Jelena - I would say that people who choose to help or give something are not people who expect something in return. They are driven by motivation and different desires. Such people do not help because of habits or expectations, but from personal need and from the heart. Our donors come from different parts of the world and have different ages, but what they have in common is that they are all people with a big heart! For example, the greatest gift of this year's $ 20,000 Gift Season campaign was given by a 78-year-old American gentleman. This inspired him to open a kindergarten in Svilajnac when he took his first steps there.

Help from Kilimanjaro

Q - Were there any unusual gifts?

Jelena - Our donors are really very creative. A couple from the Netherlands decided to conquer Kilimanjaro and donated our foundation to their foundation. By supporting friends and family, in addition to raising awareness of the importance of investing in the development of early childhood in Serbia, they have earned more than € 500. Likewise, two friends raised up to $ 2,300 on a bike, from Vietnam to Cambodia! Of course, the sweetest stories come from our youngest donors. My heart was full when the boy gave up his 12th and 13th birthday gifts and asked for donations to help children from Serbia. His selfless gesture raised $ 1,100!
 
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