Do not kid yourself, self drop-feeding is not the same thing

vex

Hall of Fame
#52
Shroud v. TTPS match. Make sure Shroud films cause we know TTPS would post it for like 10 seconds before taking it down.

Just block TTPS's weak serves back and hit to his BH, its garbage. Bonus points if you call him a spaz after he hits a FH long.
 
#55
Any practice is good practice.

Whatever you're doing you still have to move your feet and make racket contact ball.

Drop hitting is great for patterning swings and for practicing combinations.

Of course it doesn't have the pace and spin of a match. But if you're smart in an match you'll get into lots of extended baseline rallies and soon adjust to your opponent style of play
 
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#58
In another thread, @S&V-not_dead_yet said he practices approach shots by drop feeding.
To this, I say you're practicing something else. The ball is not moving towards you.
Therefore, you're perfecting a swing that will not exist in a match.
Furthermore, in a match, the ball will come off your racket using some of the pace is already has.
So, you will perfect an approach shot that will now go long in a match.

Maybe it's better than nothing (or maybe not),
but there is no substitute for someone hitting your real life short balls.

The ultimate test?? If drop feeds were so good, do the pros hardly ever use this device in their training?
what kind of drop feed approach shots were you practicing?
i personally don't like hitting slice approach shots off a drop feed, because there is a bit of calculating of income pace/spin going on in a live point (but i will still practice to make sure i can hit into say a 4ft square a decent number of times (ie. if i can't do it statically, no way i'm gonna do it with an incoming ball, so that helps me figure out what my "shot grouping" should be (ie. distance from line i should be aiming)
BUT i do love practicing knee height drop feeds at the service line... i get alot out of practicing the feel of fast rhs brushing up on the ball to get the ball up and down quickly (aiming for sideT's or deep down the line)

you are right, it's better than nothing, and i prefer real life, or better, someone else drop feeding for me... but unfortunately i have more opportunities to practice solo than with a partner (ie. scheuding, last minute free time, laziness in planning, etc...)
 
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#59
Just throw it towards you, then run back and get in front of it.
for approach shots, that doesn't work for me...
but on the baseline, i will toss it behind me (like for a kick serve) to practice backpedaling for an inside in/out fh
i have experimented with hitting a hard backspin fh so that it bounces back toward me... but i can't do that consistently enough :p
 
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#60
More than one kind of "good" drill. Drop feeds are one of many good drills. Good training for footwork and/or generating your own pace on groundstrokes.

ttps (or anyone in my area! i've had my wife feed me these and she doesn't play), in the spring i'd be up for feeding each other a few baskets of these drills... the # of balls per hour we could hit would be phenomenal.
 
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#63
You know what? I've never said spit to you. But since YOU'VE started the insults..

Are you the guy who could not even hit a single ball without shanking it against @nyta? 6-0 6-0? LOL, champ. And then blamed it on the racket, in classic boob fashion?
If you arent a 3.5 underhanded spaz you wouldnt be soo hurt and offended.

Get NYTA to give you some coaching on how to be cool.
what i find funny is that IRL both you guys would probably get along really well.. ie. we're all hyper geeky analytical about our tennis game (which relative to even the upcoming 12y juniors - all our games suck :p)
but beer and internet grows muscles i guess...
 
#66
It's already Monday 3pm on East coast. And no new thread from ttps. Disappointed.

How about, " why practice if you play different people in matches. They all hit different. So practicing does not make sense. You need to kidnap your next opponent and make him hit to you for a month straight and then challenge him in a match. Also you are all idiots "
 
#67
I personally think that if you can play around the world (you hit the ball, run to the other baseline, hit the ball) by yourself, while hitting only hard/driving shots is the best practice - both from a skill and athleticism standpoint.

Unfortunately, I rarely get more than 1 hit into it.
 
#68
what i find funny is that IRL both you guys would probably get along really well.. ie. we're all hyper geeky analytical about our tennis game (which relative to even the upcoming 12y juniors - all our games suck :p)
but beer and internet grows muscles i guess...
Of course in real life things are different. But internet coolness you can give lessons on and now I have to add beer to the diet.

Its like Leed. Internet Leed is very differnt from in person Leed. Sure TTPS is the same.
 
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#69
Of course in real life things are different. But internet coolness you can give lessons on and now I have to add beer to the diet.

Its like Leed. Internet Leed is very differnt from in person Leed. Sure TTPS is the same.
i'm sorry that i missed the chance to meet the legendary Leed when i was out there (glad i got to hit with you!). he does sound like an interesting guy who's has an interesting life (image: world's most interesting guy pic)
 
#70
i'm sorry that i missed the chance to meet the legendary Leed when i was out there (glad i got to hit with you!). he does sound like an interesting guy who's has an interesting life (image: world's most interesting guy pic)
Not switching sticks after the 1st set drubbing is one of my biggest regrets :(

Leed is the real deal man.
 
#74
If TTPS isn't paying nyta, it's a crime. Constantly having to clean up after your friend's latest mess has to be frustrating. Hope TTPS realizes how lucky he is to have a good man like nyta as his friend, and doesn't continue to put him in these tough situations.
 
#75
only way for drop feeding shots too be useful is if you lob it backwards and quickly rush into position.. or really as long as the ball is slowly coming towards you. at least you can practice power shotting off a almost dead ball.
 
#76
Nah more useful than that. Tomas at feel tennis has a great drill where he's practicing footwork to different lengths of short ball and drop feeding. If you are throwing out to the tram lines you can practice lateral footwork + recovery footwork. EG you hit Cross Court and then recover to that position. Then you hit down the line and recover further over. And if you are moving quickly to the tram lines you are practicing your spacing.
 
#77
Shroud v. TTPS match. Make sure Shroud films cause we know TTPS would post it for like 10 seconds before taking it down.

Just block TTPS's weak serves back and hit to his BH, its garbage. Bonus points if you call him a spaz after he hits a FH long.
We should start a gofundme, I would pay to watch this video and the thread that follows.
 
#79
In another thread, @S&V-not_dead_yet said he practices approach shots by drop feeding.
To this, I say you're practicing something else. The ball is not moving towards you.
Therefore, you're perfecting a swing that will not exist in a match.
Furthermore, in a match, the ball will come off your racket using some of the pace is already has.
So, you will perfect an approach shot that will now go long in a match.

Maybe it's better than nothing (or maybe not),
but there is no substitute for someone hitting your real life short balls.

The ultimate test?? If drop feeds were so good, do the pros hardly ever use this device in their training?
Drop feeds are not ideal but better than nothing and close enough to the real thing that you should be able to adjust.
 
#80
In another thread, @S&V-not_dead_yet said he practices approach shots by drop feeding.
To this, I say you're practicing something else. The ball is not moving towards you.
Therefore, you're perfecting a swing that will not exist in a match.
Furthermore, in a match, the ball will come off your racket using some of the pace is already has.
So, you will perfect an approach shot that will now go long in a match.

Maybe it's better than nothing (or maybe not),
but there is no substitute for someone hitting your real life short balls.

The ultimate test?? If drop feeds were so good, do the pros hardly ever use this device in their training?
Drop feeds are not ideal but beter than nothing and close enough that you should be able to adjust.
 
#81
How about, " why practice if you play different people in matches. They all hit different. So practicing does not make sense. "
Actually, that was his logic for why he doesn't split step during RoS: opponents' serves are too variable, therefore he can't time the split properly, ends up late, and if you're too late, it's worse than no split.

This makes no sense to me as every opponent varies not just in their serve but every other stroke as well as personality and playing style and conditioning, etc. You adapt to each one as they come.
 
#82
In another thread, @S&V-not_dead_yet said he practices approach shots by drop feeding.
To this, I say you're practicing something else. The ball is not moving towards you.
Therefore, you're perfecting a swing that will not exist in a match.
Furthermore, in a match, the ball will come off your racket using some of the pace is already has.
So, you will perfect an approach shot that will now go long in a match.

Maybe it's better than nothing (or maybe not),
but there is no substitute for someone hitting your real life short balls.

The ultimate test?? If drop feeds were so good, do the pros hardly ever use this device in their training?
Drop feeds are not ideal but beter than nothing and close enough that you should be able to adjust.
 
#87
Actually, that was his logic for why he doesn't split step during RoS: opponents' serves are too variable, therefore he can't time the split properly, ends up late, and if you're too late, it's worse than no split.

This makes no sense to me as every opponent varies not just in their serve but every other stroke as well as personality and playing style and conditioning, etc. You adapt to each one as they come.
I don't get it either.
 
#88
Actually, that was his logic for why he doesn't split step during RoS: opponents' serves are too variable, therefore he can't time the split properly, ends up late, and if you're too late, it's worse than no split.

This makes no sense to me as every opponent varies not just in their serve but every other stroke as well as personality and playing style and conditioning, etc. You adapt to each one as they come.
Because a rally ball is slower than a serve.
And opponents rally balls vary less than their serves.
If you mess up the split timing on a rally, you still have tons of time to react.
 
#89
I've seen videos of Sock, Wawrinka and Dimitrov doing drop feed drills. So I suspect it's pretty common among the pros. One of the single hardest things to do in tennis is to consistently generate your own pace off of balls that don't have much pace. I believe that's what the drop feed drills are for.
I agree wholeheartedly. The drop feed method helps me most against pushers or wen I play combo league and the opponent is a lower level. I learned from an instructor several years ago that it is hard to make pace of a ball that returns dead or slower than what you sent over the net. It is easy to respond to an opponent who has good pace on the ball.
 
#90
Because a rally ball is slower than a serve.
And opponents rally balls vary less than their serves.
If you mess up the split timing on a rally, you still have tons of time to react.
Those examples are all steps on a continuum for me. Some rally balls from better players I face go faster than some serves from lesser players. Tell your D1 coach to unload on a few FHs and compare that to the serves you face on a regular basis.
 
#91
In another thread, @S&V-not_dead_yet said he practices approach shots by drop feeding.
To this, I say you're practicing something else. The ball is not moving towards you.
Therefore, you're perfecting a swing that will not exist in a match.
A shot occurred in a match today that was pretty much like my drop feed: my opponent's shot was a high-ish floater mis-hit so the trajectory of the incoming ball was almost vertical, just like my drop feeds. I was able to short-hop it just like I've been practicing.
 
#92
I personally think that if you can play around the world (you hit the ball, run to the other baseline, hit the ball) by yourself, while hitting only hard/driving shots is the best practice - both from a skill and athleticism standpoint.

Unfortunately, I rarely get more than 1 hit into it.
My serve is so good that when I try this, I am constantly acing myself.

Proof that my serve is at least NTRP 5.5. I can probably ace Federer and Djokovic too with the right training opportunities.
 
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