Do Rackets from post 2000 really go "dead?"

luke715

New User
I'm sure there are other posts about this and I'm sure there are plenty of people still playing regularly with sticks from the 80s, 90s and 00s, but I'm wondering on the conventional wisdom.

Hypothetically speaking, if your rackets are stored 9 months of the year in your garage in temperatures ranging from -30 C to 30 C and used for three months a year, strung weekly, how much does relate to a change in performance vs a newer version of the same model.

I'm using a racket that is pretty old---pre youtek Speed. I'm thinking about moving to a newer model because both frames feel pretty different in terms of responsiveness to newer rackets that I try out. But maybe they just feel different and I'm throwing away 400 bucks by buying newer frames.
 

topspn

Legend
I’ve never owned a racquet in my life and stored it in a garage. For fun I have wooden Dunlop maxply fort from circa 1980 in mint condition and still plays perfectly well. I don’t have any other racquets that are older. But please consider treating your racquets a bit better and bring them in from the garage. These are nasty conditions you’re storing them in
 

weelie

Semi-Pro
I have no idea. But I always felt that just hitting and restringing is what really wears the rackets out, not storing them. Then again the rackets I played with and used when I got back to playing after 20 year hiatus, were really soft (low RA). Were they like that from the get go or has the storage done that?

I have never bought newest model rackets. My current main rackets are a few years old model, I bought them slightly used 50 a piece. I see a couple of models in the stores now that I could probably switch to (Clash, current Radical S... the previous ones after the generation I play, I did not like). Which means in one or two years, I might do just that, when the prices drop to like 50% of original. YMMV.
 
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Kevo

Legend
If you like the way another racquet feels when you hit with it and you want to buy it and you have the disposable cash, then go for it. Personally I don't buy the racquets go soft and you have to buy new ones thing. I mean it certainly happens, but it's rare. For competition players that play daily and string their frames hundreds of times then yeah, it can happen. For regular people, I don't think you are going to ever wear out a frame. They can certainly get beat up, but worn out is a real stretch I think.

I am currently playing with some really soft fiberglass composite Rossignol frames from the 80s and I love them. I don't think I'll ever switch to something else if I'm still capable of playing tennis with them. Might be forced to switch to the largest frame I can find when I'm old and immobile, but until then it's swing away with abandon!
 

MarTennis

Semi-Pro
my child is high level Junior who went to a racket tech seminar and was told by the lead technician that today's rackets are good for 40 stringings and then they are done. Mind you this may not apply outside of high-level play
 

max

Legend
my child is high level Junior who went to a racket tech seminar and was told by the lead technician that today's rackets are good for 40 stringings and then they are done. Mind you this may not apply outside of high-level play

I suspect it's like that. I've got 20 year old racquets that have had a good many restringings and some just go "dead" or have a completely muted feel to them, less spring---mind you, I only notice this since this model is especially flexy. It might be the case that really stiff ones just get a bit more flex and perhaps could even feel better to you.
 
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