Do stringers have to replace broken strings?

TinaDash

New User
This is why I only string for a few people. These responses to this scenario or others show a lack of respect for stringers and stringing. Stringing just doesn't pay enough to deal with this headache. Lets say your labor fee is $20 (very high end) and you can string a racquet every 15 minutes (very fast). That's a maximum of $80/hour. A more likely scenario is $15 labor and 2 racquets per hour for $30/hour. It's not worth the sore fingers, crazy gripes, etc. I make more at my day job and I don't have to stop what I'm doing to answer questions about some hybrid or tension theory from a 3.0 player who couldn't tell the difference between nylon at 60lbs and natural gut at 40lbs.

Side note: I'm amazed at the guys who will drive 30 minutes to have me put on an overgrip for them. They're the same ones who show me their Walmart racquet with the stencil completely intact and ask me if the strings need replaced. NO THEY DON'T need replaced. Go play!
well yeah. The stringing labor fee I pay is 20 pounds. If you think stringing is a ****ty job then dont string. Its not that hard
 

jim e

Legend
You know I started stringing in 1968, and have run across just about everything. Yes, very rarely I do come across a bad set of string that is undetectable upon examination. One time the string snapped on 1st main string pull right in middle of stringbed, and another time on last cross string pull. No doubt was a defective set each time. No way to know that until tension was applied.The string was from my inventory, so I restrung and swallowed the loss of string price.
Both of these incidents were same manufacturer.
I no longer use that manufacturer strings, as it is not just a simple email to get reimbursed as another poster commented above, at least not with that manufacturer.
String enough racquets over a long stretch of time and this does once in a great while happen. If my supplied string, I do take care of it. Someone else supplied, then it's their issue, as they purchased it not me. Like I said, it is a rare incident that this happens, fortunately.

Manufacturer does have issues at times. Quality control is not flawless. A poster recently on these boards commented that there was only 32 feet of string in the package marked 40 feet.
What if you supplied that to a stringer, and he spent time stringing a 1 piece and was short to finish?
You said you gave him a perfect fine set of strings, but actually you really don't know that for a fact.
If those jobs I did were a players supplied string there would be a different issue. My policy would stand for player supplies string, and players that supply string are told this, so they know my policy before I string, so if this does happen, there is no misunderstanding.
You asked for opinion and you have mine, as it is just not what you wanted to hear is all.
You solved your issue as you went back to another stringer.
Most stringers should have a policy, if they don't tell you when you drop off racquet, then ask what the policy is, then you will not have issues, if this rare occurrence should ever occur again.
 
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I restring my rackets twice a month so I cannot afford to pay an extra labor fee (40 pounds).
Out of curiosity why do you restring so often? If money is an object why not wait until they break? I've only once had a racket restrung before the strings broke. I use VS Black--two sticks with gut and one with nylon in case of damp conditions. The only time I've ever had a racket restrung before the strings broke was when I believed all the hype about using luxilon with gut--hated it and had it cut out--what a waste! Are you a pro? Tournament player?--just curious?
 

Ronaldo

Bionic Poster
Out of curiosity why do you restring so often? If money is an object why not wait until they break? I've only once had a racket restrung before the strings broke. I use VS Black--two sticks with gut and one with nylon in case of damp conditions. The only time I've ever had a racket restrung before the strings broke was when I believed all the hype about using luxilon with gut--hated it and had it cut out--what a waste! Are you a pro? Tournament player?--just curious?
After breaking strings in three racquets then breaking all three again three weeks later with 15 minutes of each other, decided buy a stringer. Also decided to stop using 17 gauge SG in Profiles with an 18x20 string pattern. Haven't broken a string in over 10 yrs.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
@TinaDash I assume it will cost you more is you take your racket to your stringer and have him install the string you want than if you buy the string and just pay the stringer a labor fee. That’s because the stringer must first stock the inventory you like and assume the complete responsibility of the string. Both cost the stringer more money.
 

BlueB

Legend
I normally string for myself... However, once I was away and needed my racquet restrung. I had a half pack of gut and poly for crosses. Stringers have busted the gut and replaced it with synthetic gut, without asking. They didn't charge me for the labor, or the syn gut they used, in despite me insisting to pay. I still tipped the guy.
 

Ronaldo

Bionic Poster
Tough to find any stringer or shop that has a stash of Blue Star anymore. One stringer claimed my strings had dry rot. Just realized that I bought my last four sets a yr ago in May.
 
From your perspective:
Paid 20 pounds and lost a set of strings and got nothing.

From the stringer’s perspective:
Customer brought me ****ty strings. I wasted my time for nothing. So I’ll charge him because it’s his fault he brings bad strings.

It’s just a matter of perspective. If I was the stringer I would not have charged you. But I would string it with my own string and charge additional costs for my string. If you didn’t want it strung with my string I would give you everything back without charging. If you brought me a new string and it snapped again. I would charge you for the labor of both times and tell you that I won’t string with your string again.
 

dak95_00

Hall of Fame
well yeah. The stringing labor fee I pay is 20 pounds. If you think stringing is a ****ty job then dont string. Its not that hard
I wasn't actually directing it at you but.....

That's a high fee for labor. You should consider buying a stringer and do it yourself. It would pay for itself in no time. Unless you just don't care to learn or fiddle with it, in which case, you should just get out your wallet and pay those fees. You're correct that stringing isn't very hard. It is time consuming and some strings are more of a pita than others. I don't like natural gut due to its fragility while stringing, poly strings because they're stiff, or weird sets like Gamma Rough which are no fun to weave. Any of those sets take me more time than simple synthetic guts or multifilaments. I personally wouldn't have charged you a fee for those strings breaking but I definitely understand the professionals like Irvin and Jim e would; I'm a hobbyist.

And to be honest, I don't string for many others and avoid the people who aren't gracious. There are many, many that call me and I don't go out of my way to call them back to string their racquets. I now have a feeling you wouldn't get a callback from me or even a text response. It could also be why you are charged so much for the service i.e. to put up with your ugly attitude.
 

FIRETennis

Professional
If they want your business and then it's a no brainer.

Stringer needs to procure your string and give you a strung finished job, possibly with a discounted or free labor for the inconvenience and extra time. If stringer does not care for procuring the string, he should pay for the string cost which he/she broke and not charge any labor if all they are giving back to you is an empty frame.

Did he bring to your attention "their policy" before you dropped off the string or did you sign some waiver on the string job paperwork?

Pretty unusual for the stringer to give you money for a broken string.
Really? How would you feel if you dropped off a $42 natural gut and they gave you an empty frame with a broke string !?! :oops:
 

eah123

Semi-Pro
Really? How would you feel if you dropped off a $42 natural gut and they gave you an empty frame with a broke string !?! :oops:
My fault for using an expensive/overpriced string.

My point is that I don't think any stringer is going to take his wallet out to reimburse you for a broken string that you supplied. Well maybe @g4driver but he is rich. :)
 

mtommer

Hall of Fame
How do you know I gave him bad strings?
It doesn't matter if you gave bad strings or not, precisely because you can't know. You're salty because you had to pay for something you really don't feel you had to pay for and the string breaking isn't really what you're salty about. However, at this point you are now coming across as whining. This tells me you're most likely stingy or funds for restringing aren't always easy for you. Hey, I've been there and I've had the feeling of let down. I've also been reality checked and had to separate emotion from the reality of the situation. The fact is you never really thought to ask about the situation prior to it happening, most likely as a result of inexperience. That would be true for me too. So, take it as a lesson learned and just move on (which means stop trying to defend a position, thank the posters who kindly offered advice, and let the post drop off).
 

FIRETennis

Professional
My fault for using an expensive/overpriced string.

My point is that I don't think any stringer is going to take his wallet out to reimburse you for a broken string that you supplied. Well maybe @g4driver but he is rich. :)
So if you take a BMW to service and their wrench slips and breaks the GPS LCD screen, you'd just accept your car back like that and go order a new LCD?
 

jim e

Legend
So if you take a BMW to service and their wrench slips and breaks the GPS LCD screen, you'd just accept your car back like that and go order a new LCD?
If I gave the BMW service a part to put in, and it was returned with that part I supplied installed and it was defective part, I would expect to pay for that service.
 

FIRETennis

Professional
If I gave the BMW service a part to put in, and it was returned with that part I supplied installed and it was defective part, I would expect to pay for that service.
If the BMW service (stringer) accepts you to bring your own part (aka string) and tells you at your own risk.. then the service (stringer) is in the right in this case, otherwise the client is in the right.

Was the OP @TinaDash aware of the stringer's policy before giving them the string to string?
Was the string in a sealed pack, was it a reel that was given to the stringer to cut from or was it just a piece of hanging string?
 

jim e

Legend
I notify anyone who brings string to me to string up my policy before it begins, this I commented above in my comments above.
I have received , although very rarely, defective string in sealed packs. String for years, and string enough, and you will eventually come across this as well. Quality control is not 100 percent. Like I commented before a couple weeks back, a poster on these forums posted that his unopened set of string had 32 feet of string, not 40 that is written on package. Would you blame the stringer for that as well because the package was sealed? Sealed package means nothing, but maybe to you it does?
My policy is simple, supply me your string, and no guarantees, player that supplies string assumes responsibility if issues with string. I supply then my issue.
If OP doesn't like a policy as such, then OP can choose another stringer, simple as that
 
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LocNetMonster

Professional
He returned the broken string to me but did not tell me where or how it broke. I am happy to give him another roll of strings but I really don't think its fair to pay the labor twice
For fun, I'm going to play devil's advocate for a bit longer. Did you ask for a one-piece or two-piece stringing? Can you post a close-up photo or two of the pieces where the string broke? Figuring out the where is kinda easy if it was a two-piece, a bit harder on a one-piece. Just have to measure the distance from the ends to the stress point to figure out where.


I restring my rackets twice a month so I cannot afford to pay an extra labor fee (40 pounds).
Personally speaking, if you told me you were going to bring me four racquets a month to restring, I'd have picked up the same string at retail somewhere and installed it. While installing supplied VS gut mains in hybrid setup, the grommets in the client's new racquet backed out of the frame partially (which is what I'm wondering what happened here) and I put a crimp in the string. He normally brings me six to eight racquets a month. Naturally, I told them about it and bought a half set to replace it.

The person you dealt with is an idiot. Unless they are the only game in town, I wouldn't darken their door ever again. Someone else made a good point: You should look at learning to string yourself. You could pick up a Gamma Progression for around £300. At £20 for labor, you would pay for the stringer after your 15th racquet or basically in four months assuming you are restringing 4x a month, eight months if you are restringing one racquet twice a month. Plus, you don't have to go to the stringer's shop, put up with their arrogance and can restring without having to plan around dropping them off and picking them up.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
Really? How would you feel if you dropped off a $42 natural gut and they gave you an empty frame with a broke string !?!
If you expect the stringer to replace the natural gut string if it breaks, how much do you feel is a reasonable charge for 1 labor and 2 for accepting the responsibility of replacing the string if it breaks?
 

FIRETennis

Professional
I notify anyone who brings string to me to string up my policy before it begins, this I commented above in my comments above.
I have received , although very rarely, defective string in sealed packs. String for years, and string enough, and you will eventually come across this as well. Quality control is not 100 percent. Like I commented before a couple weeks back, a poster on these forums posted that his unopened set of string had 32 feet of string, not 40 that is written on package. Would you blame the stringer for that as well because the package was sealed?
My policy is simple, supply me your string, and no guarantees, player that supplies string assumes responsibility if issues with string. I supply then my issue.
If OP doesn't like a policy as such, then OP can choose another stringer, simple as that
It seems to the be battle of stringers vs. customer ...
@g4driver - care to share your thoughts on the issue?

As a customer, the problem is that a lot of shops don't have good prices for strings or availability in case you want a specific string, but they do have employees and a stringing machine. I have gotten so many bad string jobs from various shops that I decided to bite the bullet and learn to string and buy my own machine.

If a customer does not want to learn to string they are stuck with bad pricing from the shop or not their string of choice or worse, shop employee errors which leads to a broken string and no racquet to play your match with on time.

I do not see why the customer is 100% on the hook if they bring their own string. What if a customer hands you a reel for you to string for him, and you or your employee breaks their ALU power string job on the knot, do you just take more from you just take more from their reel ? I don't see why the customer is on the hook for this 100%....
What if you don't carry the string or charge 50% more than the price they can get from TW etc... I guess they should only string at their own risk at your shop.

If you expect the stringer to replace the natural gut string if it breaks, how much do you feel is a reasonable charge for 1 labor and 2 for accepting the responsibility of replacing the string if it breaks?
Running a business without any risk? Is there a seminar.... where do I signup....
 
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Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
I do not see however why the customer is 100% on the hook if they bring their own string. What if a customer hands you a reel for you to string for him, and you or your employee breaks their ALU power string job on the knot, do you just take more from you just take more from their reel ? I don't see why the customer is on the hook for this 100%....
I can remember 2 sets of string that broke while I was stringing it, for no apartment reason. One was a Tecnifibre set and the other was Gamma. Both sets were replaced by the manufacturer.

If a customer brings me string to work with and it breaks he should go back to where he got it and get it replaced.
 

FIRETennis

Professional
I can remember 2 sets of string that broke while I was stringing it, for no apartment reason. One was a Tecnifibre set and the other was Gamma. Both sets were replaced by the manufacturer.

If a customer brings me string to work with and it breaks he should go back to where he got it and get it replaced.
Who decides if the string breakage during stringing is the manufacturer's fault or the stringer's or his equipment's fault?
 

jim e

Legend
It should not be so complicated as you put it.
I charge a fee for labor, plus charge I pay for string. I get string from TW, so it is labor fee plus this string charge. I try to carry a large inventory, but impossible to carry everything. If request for a string I don't have, them it's labor fee plus string fee it costs me, and if only ordering that string it's string plus shipping, as it is my cost . It may take couple days for string to come in, but that's life.
 

jim e

Legend
Who decides if the string breakage during stringing is the manufacturer's fault or the stringer's or his equipment's fault?
Evidently you have an answer for that don't you?
If you state a policy beforehand then no issue, is that not correct? This is what I have been saying all along, but some people here can't grasp this!
 

FIRETennis

Professional
Evidently you have an answer for that don't you?
If you state a policy beforehand then no issue is that not correct?
You are correct, if there is a policy... @TinaDash didn't mention if their policy was made clear to them before the incident.

Seems that the stringers in this thread just put the risk and blame on the customer, manufacturer but not their own human error?
 

Shaolin

G.O.A.T.
This stringer is a joke.

He/she could have at least offered to replace it with some cheap synthetic strings they had (stringers always have tons extra string on hand).

They also could have offered half price labor since obviously they didnt so a full string job.

I'd never use that stringer again.
 

jim e

Legend
Really? How would you feel if you dropped off a $42 natural gut and they gave you an empty frame with a broke string !?! :oops:
I string a decent amount of nat gut. Most of the time I supply string. Twice stringing this one brand of a quality brand gut string broke , and no doubt manufacturing error. Since I supplied string, I made good. After contacting manufacturer, a couple weeks later, they wanted strings returned with stringbed cut out in one section showing break, along with package and receipt of place of purchase sent back. I said the hell with that, strings were already cut out the proper way,and decided not to purchase or offer that string again. Evidently other stringers must have had similar issues as you cannot even purchase that gut string today, as no longer available. But many would say it's the stringers fault.
Once someone supplied a set of another quality gut for me to string, and I noticed a notch a few feet from one end. Returned to player unstrung. He wanted me to deal with company. I told him he bought it, his issue. Some would blame stringer for that!
 

jim e

Legend
Seems that the stringers in this thread just put the risk and blame on the customer, manufacturer but not their own human error?
Why don't you string for a good number of years and a good number of frames and see if your outlook changes on this topic.
I'm done with this thread!
I'm glad my players I string for are gracious, and refer others to me, and I rid my players like you!
 

FIRETennis

Professional
Why don't you string for a good number of years and a good number of frames and see if your outlook changes on this topic.
I'm done with this thread!
I'm glad my players I string for are gracious, and refer others to me, and I rid my players like you!
You must have a queue of customers out the door!
 

FIRETennis

Professional
It should not be so complicated as you put it.
I charge a fee for labor, plus charge I pay for string. I get string from TW, so it is labor fee plus this string charge. I try to carry a large inventory, but impossible to carry everything. If request for a string I don't have, them it's labor fee plus string fee it costs me, and if only ordering that string it's string plus shipping, as it is my cost . It may take couple days for string to come in, but that's life.
Just trying to understand your business acumen, so if you could please clarify...

So, you as a stringer like the shop @TinaDash went to, would rather save the cost of doing a freebie $10 string (which is what would cost you anyway if you took the string from your own reel and it wasn't brough to you) instead of keeping a customer (and his friends, tennis partners etc) that strings 4 frames a month?
 

LocNetMonster

Professional
The only string to break while tensioning it was 18g FireWire. I went through three 1/2 sets where the string snapped at the grommet while pulling the last main in one of my racquets.. So it probably didn't help, though I didn't have a problem on the first 7 mains, that my reference tension was 80#. I gave it one more try before giving up and on the 4th attempt, at 75#. No problem, finally. But it did make me want to see if the thicker gauge behaved the same and if it would have snapped at say 78 or 79#.
 

jim e

Legend
Just trying to understand your business acumen, so if you could please clarify...

So, you as a stringer like the shop @TinaDash went to, would rather save the cost of doing a freebie $10 string (which is what would cost you anyway if you took the string from your own reel and it wasn't brough to you) instead of keeping a customer (and his friends, tennis partners etc) that strings 4 frames a month?
It's not a $10.00 string as you call it. Check the OP post.Unless you have dealership, as most my strings come from TW.
This is not my real job, just a side line for years, due to lack of quality stringers in my area. My free time has a value. Maybe yours is different. I am not going to waste my time and effort on something that is not my problem. If I give a free job away, which I do from time to time, it's my choice, not someone telling me to.The problem goes back to the person that creates it.
This is why I have a policy. It's there for a reason.like I said, this is a rare occurrence. It is how I handle it. Players have a choice.
 
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FIRETennis

Professional
It's not a $10.00 string as you call it. Unless you have dealership, as most my strings come from TW.
This is not my real job, just a side line for years, due to lack of quality stringers in my area. My free time has a value. Maybe yours is different. I am not going to waste my time and effort on something that is not my problem. The problem goes back to the person that creates it.
OK I didn't know it was a hobby, I understood you were a professional stringer running a stringing business or shop, sorry!

What's the difference between eating the $10-$20 cost if the string that broke was one you took from your reel of Tecnifibre HDMX or TGV or so purchased from TW ?
If the customer brings the same string and it breaks, you lose $0 but annoy and maybe chase off a customer
If you use your own reel from TW and it breaks, you lose $10-$20 since you have to take out another set from your reel, but you keep a customer & their friends, relatives, partners, kids etc...

The reality is that string shops that are adamant about this policy 'your own risk with your string' want to offload their own stock onto customers usually at disadvantageous pricing and discourage customers from bringing their own strings. That's the reason why it exists, not about the cost of the broken string job replacement or customers that leave their ALU Power reel in a hot car for week :rolleyes:

PS. Tecnifibre HDMX 16/1.25 String Reel - 660' - $219.95 for what 16-17 string jobs? $13.. plus tax+shipping... close enough to $10 for ya?
 
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Return_Ace

Hall of Fame
NGL, couldn't be bothered to read the whole thread.

I once had the same situation you describe, gave my stringer a bunch of rackets along with the strings i wanted and he phoned me up a few days later saying that one of the sets (syn gut) had snapped whilst pulling tension.

Asked whether or not i wanted to give him a new set, or string with something from his stock instead, to which i gave him a second set and he just charged me the one instance of labour.

We talked it through and he assumed that the string had been sitting somewhere for a while since the packaging was an older branding run.

At the end of the day, i trusted that he hadn't made a mistake, since he's a (retired) tournament stringer; and he trusted me that i wasn't trying to waste his time with crappy string, since he's strung a few rackets for me without issue, and it's more hassle for me to go to the shop and replace the string etc.

I will say though, £20 labor seems steep for me, my current stringer charges me £12, and the one mentioned above was £13. Most I'd pay would probably be £15 labour.

At the end of the day, as to whether or not you should find a new stringer; if your don't trust him with the string you're providing, i certainly wouldn't trust him with your rackets.
 

FIRETennis

Professional
At the end of the day, as to whether or not you should find a new stringer; if your don't trust him with the string you're providing, i certainly wouldn't trust him with your rackets.
I wonder how the stringers here on the forum deal with racquets breaking while stringing... Customer fault?
 

jim e

Legend
I wonder how the stringers here on the forum deal with racquets breaking while stringing... Customer fault?
This question has been gone over in the stringers section in the past. You can get many responses if you do a search.
I check racquets over real well before I even cut strings out. Cracks are visible most of the time, and I have turned down many jobs because of cracked frame. Most cracks at 2 and 10 o'clock. As well as at area that throat attaches to hoop. Although I have seen cracks near the handle as well.
Stringing puts a great deal of stress on a frame. String a cracked frame and stringer can be purchasing a new racquet for someone.
Very important step to thoroughly check racquet over. I have not cracked a racquet yet.I really don't want to waste time on a badly damaged frame. I'm sure I will catch hell now for refusing to string up a cracked one.
I remember one time playing against one player, after he threw racquet he kicked it into the fence. Two weeks later he brought it to be strung, sure enough it was cracked. I'm sure @FIRETennis would blame stringer. After all it's always the stringers fault.
 
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LocNetMonster

Professional
I wonder how the stringers here on the forum deal with racquets breaking while stringing... Customer fault?
Knock on wood -- it has not happened to me yet. Like @jim e I check the racquet over for cracks, inspect the head guard and look over the grommets. If I see something, I let the player know there could be an issue or a future one. I restrung this one a couple times when it was in this shape on a drop-weight machine: https://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/ind...place-that-head-guard-on-your-racquet.601268/ I finally had to tell the guy, lo siento, no más.
 

Yamin

Semi-Pro
I'm not a great stringer. If I bust a string due to manufacturer defect I'm calling them and fixing it. If it was my fault, I'd still fix it. I wouldn't accept stringing gut or anything cut from reel.

Why wouldn't a good stringer do this? If you take pride in your work and have some integrity you wouldn't charge them for the job with no real explanation and send them home...
 

aussie

Professional
I remember in the early 2000's having my racquet strung by the club stringer and it lasted 3 games before it snapped. I never break strings. To me the string was faulty but he didn't agree and charged me another $35 to restring.

Soon after I bought my own stringing machine and have strung hundreds of string jobs. Still have never broken a string other than that one.

Strings do have imperfections and can break under tension. I would always restring a racquet free of charge in the above situation. It's called goodwill.
 

blablavla

G.O.A.T.
How do you know I gave him bad strings? Most Stringers should check the quality of the strings they are stringing. In this case there were no problems seen in the beginning. I wouldn't blame him if he told me the string was faulty.
Thats just like giving the mechanic a perfectly working engine and car, then they break it due to their technique. Why would I have to pay labor if I gave him a product which he examined?
How can you prove that strings were good & it was a mistake on the stringer side?
 

blablavla

G.O.A.T.
If it was from a reel, I'd say the labor charge could be justified depending how deep into the string job they were... people have no integrity though.

If it was a pack, you shouldn't have been charged anything and the stringer should offer a free job with a comparable string.

I wouldn't have paid the labor. You're expecting a person to do their job correctly and you're paying for a job done. The burden shouldn't ever be on the customer unless they potentially caused an issue.

I've seldom had string issues/defects but when I have an email has been enough to get a replacement.... the customer would most likely not even have knowledge of the situation and would have no recourse...
You know that strings do snap sometimes?
So if the stringer did his / her part correctly, why they shouldn't be paid?
Or can you prove the mistake on the stringer side?
 

blablavla

G.O.A.T.
I'm not a great stringer. If I bust a string due to manufacturer defect I'm calling them and fixing it. If it was my fault, I'd still fix it. I wouldn't accept stringing gut or anything cut from reel.

Why wouldn't a good stringer do this? If you take pride in your work and have some integrity you wouldn't charge them for the job with no real explanation and send them home...
exactly, so what if the stringer's job was good, and the string was faulty?
remember, the string was brought in by customer

1. why would you waive the price of your work?
2. is there any proof that the stringer made a mistake and thus caused this trouble?
 

am1899

Hall of Fame
Speaking from personal experience stringing in a retail shop for several years:

I am happy to string with any viable string provided by the customer. And as is the case on any string job, I will stand behind my work. That is, in the event that a customer brings their racquet back with a complaint, we will assess if we made a mistake which caused their dissatisfaction. If so, we will work with the customer to make the situation right. However, I will not warranty string provided by the customer. Though it is not common in my experience, string can be defective or compromised in some way, which could cause the string to break prematurely. I have no idea where your string came from, how old it is, where it was stored, etc. The bottom line is, I’m not going to warranty any product that doesn’t come out of my inventory.

The above, by the way, is not all that dissimilar from your local car mechanic - if your mechanic will allow you to provide your own parts for work he’s going to do on your car (and that is a big if), no legit mechanic is going to stand behind parts you provided - if they break, don’t last, something is wrong with them, etc, that’s between you and the parts mfg/distributor, not your mechanic.

Now, in your scenario OP...did the shop have TGV in stock? Or did you provide them with a set of TGV to put in your racquet? If it’s the former, the shop should have eaten the broken set of string and restrung your racquet, no questions asked. For me, you shouldn’t have had to pay anything extra - other than for the 1 set of string and 1 labor charge.

If however you provided your own string, and it broke during stringing...for me you’re SOL, as so far as the initial set of string you provided. Either you’ll have to provide another set of string and I’ll try again, or tell me what string I have in inventory you’d like instead. Some shops in this scenario might even try to charge you labor twice - once for the 1st string job where the string broke, and another for the subsequent job. Me, I think that’s tacky - I’d only charge you labor for a completed string job.
 
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PKorda

Semi-Pro
Speaking from personal experience stringing in a retail shop for several years:

I am happy to string with any viable string provided by the customer. And as is the case on any string job, I will stand behind my work. That is, in the event that a customer brings their racquet back with a complaint, we will assess if we made a mistake which caused their dissatisfaction. If so, we will work with the customer to make the situation right. However, I will not warranty string provided by the customer. Though it is not common in my experience, string can be defective or compromised in some way, which could cause the string to break prematurely. I have no idea where your string came from, how old it is, where it was stored, etc. The bottom line is, I’m not going to warranty any product that doesn’t come out of my inventory.

The above, by the way, is not all that dissimilar from your local car mechanic - if your mechanic will allow you to provide your own parts for work he’s going to do on your car (and that is a big if), no legit mechanic is going to stand behind parts you provided - if they break, don’t last, something is wrong with them, etc.

Now, in your scenario OP...did the shop have TGV in stock? Or did you provide them with a set of TGV to put in your racquet? If it’s the former, the shop should have eaten the broken set of string and restrung your racquet, no questions asked. For me, you shouldn’t have had to pay anything extra - other than for the 1 set of string and 1 labor charge.

If however you provided your own string, and it broke during stringing...for me you’re SOL, as so far as the initial set of string you provided. Either you’ll have to provide another set of string and I’ll try again, or tell me what string I have in inventory you’d like instead. Some shops in this scenario might even try to charge you labor twice - once for the 1st string job where the string broke, and another for the subsequent job. Me, I think that’s tacky - I’d only charge you labor for a completed string job.
This is the right answer. If you bring the string you own it and that's the price you pay for not buying the string at the shop. I have a stringer now but prior to that I had this happen a few times. I just accepted that I had to eat the cost of the string but the shop should re-string the racquet (sometimes had to argue for that b/c was going to sporting goods stores where the manager knew very little about tennis but that's another story).
 

Yamin

Semi-Pro
exactly, so what if the stringer's job was good, and the string was faulty?
remember, the string was brought in by customer

1. why would you waive the price of your work?
2. is there any proof that the stringer made a mistake and thus caused this trouble?
Stringer could easily go back to the manufacturer and get replacement string at no charge if the string was faulty.

1.) If you tell someone everything is "good to go" and string breaks, then don't follow up with any communication, it doesn't sound like the stringer is the one doing a good job? I don't know how people are defending the stringer over OP in this scenario.... It's more than likely the issue is on the stringer. Every person has said string issues are uncommon but happen. I'm pretty sure we all know stringers that do questionable work.... more than do good work.

2.) No, but most signs point to it.

I don't think the stringer/shop should pay for their strings out of pocket unless 100% to blame for the accident, though this situation will never come to light unless someone is very honest. I also don't think they should waive their fee for legit work that they did, but it should be put toward a complete job unless the customer was informed of some terms and conditions.

Recently someone I know bought Champions Choice Duo and asked the stringer to put X string in mains and Y string in crosses. The stringer did not take that info down and strung it reverse. At the end of the job it was brought to their attention. Who is responsible for strings and labor? The stringer had integrity and provided a similar hybrid of their own and a new string job at no charge. If the stringer was dishonest, they could have said anything to save themselves the 60 dollars. Faulty string and bad weather caused the issue sorry 60 dollars please and here's an empty frame GFY? I don't think so.
 

blablavla

G.O.A.T.
Stringer could easily go back to the manufacturer and get replacement string at no charge if the string was faulty.
why would a stringer invest their time to sort your sh*t out?
your strings, you do it

1.) If you tell someone everything is "good to go" and string breaks, then don't follow up with any communication, it doesn't sound like the stringer is the one doing a good job? I don't know how people are defending the stringer over OP in this scenario.... It's more than likely the issue is on the stringer. Every person has said string issues are uncommon but happen. I'm pretty sure we all know stringers that do questionable work.... more than do good work.
the OP was edited, after being challenged
so, honestly, I don't know if I can trust that info to 100%

2.) No, but most signs point to it.
what precisely points to it?
stringing is a fairly easy task
if a string snaps, it's likely to be a faulty string

Recently someone I know bought Champions Choice Duo and asked the stringer to put X string in mains and Y string in crosses. The stringer did not take that info down and strung it reverse.
and based on this all stringers provide sh*ty job?
in this case, as you write, stringer made a mistake and fixed it
it has zero correlation to the OP of this thread

to summarize, if I as customer bring my strings, and pay only for the stringing job:
- it is my responsibility to provide good strings or eventually sort any issues with the brand / retailer where they were purchased
- stringer is only accountable for the work they offer, e.g. if they mess up the hybrid, if they skip a weave, if they skip a main string or a cross string
 
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Yamin

Semi-Pro
why would a stringer invest their time to sort your sh*t out?
your strings, you do it
How will the customer be able to prove anything based on the word of someone else? Especially when they're not as knowledgeable about stringing? Makes more sense for the stringer/expert to do it. I had a set of string that was 36 ft from solinco in my only string issue I've had. I sent an email and said hey it's 37 feet and they sent me a replacement. What would a customer do if I said it was short? Contact solinco and say someone else said it was shor?

what precisely points to it?
stringing is a fairly easy task
if a string snaps, it's likely to be a faulty string
Once again just whatever OP had said the first time. Stringing may be easy but what if the guy miswove, it snapped during multi prestretch (didn't even know this is a thing), clamp issue, etc?

and based on this all stringers provide sh*ty job?
in this case, as you write, stringer made a mistake and fixed it
it has zero correlation to the OP of this thread
No not all. I said I know more bad stringers than good. You skipped the part where I stated this stringer could have said a string snapped. How would anyone know the difference? Easy out.

to summarize, if I as customer bring my strings, and pay only for the stringing job:
- it is my responsibility to provide good strings or eventually sort any issues with the brand / retailer where they were purchased
- stringer is only accountable for the work they offer, e.g. if they mess up the hybrid, if they skip a weave, if they skip a main string or a cross string
Sure makes sense. I just don't agree with the issues being sorted out being on the customer necessarily. I bought an engine for a car and it had an issue once my mechanic had it. I'm not an expert nor could accurately describe the issue. I paid the expert. Guess what the expert did? Help sort it out by contacting the other party in their realm of expertise. Yeah it might be painful but that's what an expert does.
 
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