Do stringers have to replace broken strings?

blablavla

G.O.A.T.
Sure makes sense. I just don't agree with the issues being sorted out being on the customer necessarily. I bought an engine for a car and it had an issue once my mechanic had it. I'm not an expert nor could accurately describe the issue. I paid the expert. Guess what the expert did? Help sort it out by contacting the other party in their realm of expertise. Yeah it might be painful but that's what an expert does.
did you pay that expert 20 $ for 15-25 minutes of their time?
let me guess that this wasn't the case
a good stringer will do the job in 15 minutes
an average will probably do it in less than 30 minutes
that's what you pay for stringing. How much time do you think they can afford in communication with the brand / retail store in order to solve your sh*t free of charge for you?
 
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blablavla

G.O.A.T.
How will the customer be able to prove anything based on the word of someone else? Especially when they're not as knowledgeable about stringing? Makes more sense for the stringer/expert to do it. I had a set of string that was 36 ft from solinco in my only string issue I've had. I sent an email and said hey it's 37 feet and they sent me a replacement. What would a customer do if I said it was short? Contact solinco and say someone else said it was shor?
it's easy
take the string and talk to the brand / retail
when strings break because of wear & tear, you'll see that they were used
have a look at your racket, the more you play, the more difficult it will be to move the crosses, and you will notice that the main strings are 'eaten up' at the place where they intersect with crosses
if all this is missing, then it was either a faulty string, or a huge mistake of the stringer, but stringing is an easy task, so among these 2 relatively small probabilities, it is more likely that the string snapped due to faulty string

Once again just whatever OP had said the first time. Stringing may be easy but what if the guy miswove, it snapped during multi prestretch (didn't even know this is a thing), clamp issue, etc?
nope, strings don't snap because of missed weave
missed weaves will allow the strings to bend more, therefore they will provide for more power & spin in the game
google spaghetti stringing and how the regulation of modern stringing became a reality

No not all. I said I know more bad stringers than good. You skipped the part where I stated this stringer could have said a string snapped. How would anyone know the difference? Easy out.
ask for the string. easy
not sure what you mean by "more bad stringers than good"
and then again, stringing is a easy task, little can go wrong there
so if you know more bad stringers than good ones, then either your expectations are wrong, or there is something massively wrong with people in that area
now, I know a 'bad' stringer, but this stringer is not bad cause of bad job, but because I never know how much time it will take to get my racket back. In some cases it was ready the next day, in some other cases it took 3 weeks. So I just ordered a stringing machine and now I string for myself.
Stringing was also the way I earned my pocket money as a junior, and I learned it by doing, without any Youtube, without any experienced stringer teaching me, etc. so it is a fairly simple task, and a highly repetitive one, where little can go wrong, otherwise I would have destroyed strings and frames while learning
 

am1899

Hall of Fame
Stringer could easily go back to the manufacturer and get replacement string at no charge if the string was faulty.
Not necessarily, and certainly not “easily.” If it’s a string manufactured by a company the shop has a relationship with...then maybe. If not, then the shop is in no better position than the customer would be - trying to find a point of contact on the internet, etc.

It's more than likely the issue is on the stringer.
No, it isn’t. And regardless, you’re making assumptions based on very little factual information.

2.) No, but most signs point to it.
And what signs are those?
 

jim e

Legend
It's not always so easy for stringer to get replacement for defective string. I emailed one nat gut maker, a quality one at that, and was told to cut around entire string bed to show whee it snapped, even though I sent them a picture, send that string bed back along with original package, and invoice copy when purchased.
I cut strings out the normal way once it snapped in order to string it up again. I swallowed that job, but was my strings, and I take care if I supply. It's no wonder that gut manufacturer does not supply that string any more, at least at this point in time, as they evidently had a quality control problem. I stopped stringing that brand after their response to me,

Bottom line it is not as easy as sending an email as @Yamin says in his post!

If customer supplied string, that's their issue as far as I am concerned. You can do as you please. This is why policy is made.
 
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am1899

Hall of Fame
No not all. I said I know more bad stringers than good. You skipped the part where I stated this stringer could have said a string snapped. How would anyone know the difference? Easy out.
If you know more bad stringers than good that doesn’t mean necessarily that that’s reality. What it does speak to frankly, is your inability to find a stringer who can meet your needs. Which, either calls into question the community in which you live, and/or your expectations. Based on your replies already, I would guess it’s mostly the latter.
 

Yamin

Semi-Pro
nope, strings don't snap because of missed weave
missed weaves will allow the strings to bend more, therefore they will provide for more power & spin in the game
google spaghetti stringing and how the regulation of modern stringing became a reality
You seem to be missing that I'm saying they can say whatever they want. I'm not saying a misweave would cause snap I'm saying the stringer would cut the string out... If a stringer screws up "faulty string" will be the first excuse.

I'm sure you know a good string job from a bad one. Even TW has horrible string jobs.

It's not always so easy for stringer to get replacement for defective string. I emailed one nat gut maker, a quality one at that, and was told to cut around entire string bed to show whee it snapped, even though I sent them a picture, send that string bed back along with original package, and invoice copy when purchased.
I cut strings out the normal way once it snapped in order to string it up again. I swallowed that job, but was my strings, and I take care if I supply. It's no wonder that gut manufacturer does not supply that string any more, at least at this point in time, as they evidently had a quality control problem. I stopped stringing that brand after their response to me,

Bottom line it is not as easy as sending an email as @Yamin says in his post!

If customer supplied string, that's their issue as far as I am concerned. You can do as you please. This is why policy is made.
Very reasonable. You have a policy and you made an attempt. I'm sure gut would be impossible to replace given the price and higher level of difficulty of stringing.

If you know more bad stringers than good that doesn’t mean necessarily that that’s reality. What it does speak to frankly, is your inability to find a stringer who can meet your needs. Which, either calls into question the community in which you live, and/or your expectations. Based on your replies already, I would guess it’s mostly the latter.
I string for myself. It was the former. Frame nicks, not straightening crosses, horrible knots, etc. Doesn't matter though. Just not sure why this stringer no one knows personally is infallible.

Say a stringer screws up the job and I provided the strings. Should I pay their labor? No. Should they give me something for my string? Yes.

Why are you all vehemently defending this random stringer without taking a neutral stance?
 
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FIRETennis

Professional
I still don't understand the stringer's stance on why they would take the $13 hit if the TGV that broke during stringing was coming from the shop's reel and give the customer a strung racket when they came back but they would not take the $13 hit if the customer provided the TGV reel themselves....and they'd tell the customer to take a hike.
At the end of the day isn't it $13 we are taking about vs. years of stringing for that customer !?
 

blablavla

G.O.A.T.
At the end of the day isn't it $13 we are taking about vs. years of stringing for that customer !?
nope

1. as pointed out by others, there are storage conditions, and some other factors
if this was out of stringer control, then why would the stringer be accountable?

2. there is price vs cost
the price that you pay for strings let's say at tennis warehouse, isn't necessarily the cost for the stringer
- it can be that you buy a single set, while stringer buys in reels
- it can be that you buy at the retail price, while the stringer might have access to deliveries at same or similar price like tennis warehouse for example
- or it could be a mix of both, say the stringer purchases reels at the business-to-business price

in this case, the margin that the stringer is making, is not only a nice addition for the labor fee the stringer charges, but as well is covering among other things, the risk of the string snaping
so, you buy the job + strings from the stringer, it's none of your worries how many sets / meters of string they needed
if you brought your own strings, and they happened to be faulty, then it is your responsibility
 

esm

Hall of Fame
i do not recall reading that the OP is a frequent/repeat customer of this stringer where he/she goes to 4 times a months, judging by the OP.
so it is rather unfair to insist that the OP stringer should eat his/her labour cost, because there is supposed to be a long relationship/repeated custom... IMO
 

jim e

Legend
BTW, tvg if stringer doesn't have that in inventory , then a single set would need to be purchased, and at _$19.00/ set plus shipping, plus tax, is not the stringers issue if string supplied was defective.
I for one am not going to spend my free time, and pay for a set of defective string that I did not purchase, it's reason a policy is made.
Look , anyone can sell a racquet, but the stringing has the stringers signature sort of saying, and that is what the player looks for, a consistent string job.
I am a meticulous stringer, and follow protocols, and why players bring me there racquets and are gracious for what they get.
If player cannot accept that they purchased a defective set, and has to find another stringer that can supply the same quality job, then so be it.
 
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Dags

Hall of Fame
nope

1. as pointed out by others, there are storage conditions, and some other factors
if this was out of stringer control, then why would the stringer be accountable?

2. there is price vs cost
the price that you pay for strings let's say at tennis warehouse, isn't necessarily the cost for the stringer
- it can be that you buy a single set, while stringer buys in reels
- it can be that you buy at the retail price, while the stringer might have access to deliveries at same or similar price like tennis warehouse for example
- or it could be a mix of both, say the stringer purchases reels at the business-to-business price

in this case, the margin that the stringer is making, is not only a nice addition for the labor fee the stringer charges, but as well is covering among other things, the risk of the string snaping
so, you buy the job + strings from the stringer, it's none of your worries how many sets / meters of string they needed
if you brought your own strings, and they happened to be faulty, then it is your responsibility
It's also worth mentioning that the stringer has to invest in an inventory. I'm another hobbyist, and have 8-10 reels plus some sets on hand. That's probably up to a grand tied up at any given moment. I want to keep that stock moving, as trends do change. Fads with new polys are the worst for this, and more than once I've been caught holding reels of something that's gone out of fashion, and fallen out of favour when the new kid on the block has come along. The more customers who use my string, the wider the selection I can offer without fear of being left with dead stock, and vice versa.

The main take away from this thread should probably be that if you find a stringer who exhibits both skill and integrity, you should hold onto them. Use their inventory wherever possible, even if that costs you a fraction more than if you provided the string yourself, and enjoy a hassle-free experience. Not all stringers are equal, and the good ones tend to attract business from repeat customers and word of mouth. This sort of thread probably never occurs if the stringer falls into that category, as the communication would have been better and policies clearer. While this stringer is not 'wrong' in their approach, it doesn't sound like the situation was handled well.
 

LocNetMonster

Professional
i do not recall reading that the OP is a frequent/repeat customer of this stringer where he/she goes to 4 times a months,
S/he didn't. They wrote that they "restring my racquets twice a month", which, unless miscommunicated, indicates they are having at least a pair restrung each month. S/he also said it their first visit - or at least how I read it - to the string in question.


so it is rather unfair to insist that the OP stringer should eat his/her labour cost, because there is supposed to be a long relationship/repeated custom... IMO
Indeed it is unfair to insist the stringer eat the labor cost, just as it is seemingly unfair that the OP has to pay the labor cost. For me, the jury is out. I will say if the stringer had contacted the OP promptly after the string broke, explained the situation, and requested they bring another set, I would be more inclined to lean toward their corner. That's just good customer service. What the OP got is a relatively inexpensive education that they will carry and pass on to others on what to look for in a reputable stringing service. Or, should they pursue learning to string themselves, how not treat they customers in the future.
 
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am1899

Hall of Fame
Say a stringer screws up the job and I provided the strings. Should I pay their labor? No.
Agreed.

Should they give me something for my string? Yes.
If it was the stringer’s fault, sure, he and the shop should own up to making a mistake and either replace your string or offer you a comparable string free of charge. However, if the problem wasn’t the stringer’s fault, then nope - you shouldn’t expect your string to be replaced. So, it’s not a universal, “yes.” It depends.

Your apparent opinion that stringers and shops are generally untrustworthy, and all (or even most) would rather lie to you to save $13 - than admit they made a mistake and do right by you...says a lot more about you and the type of customer you are, rather than anything in the realm of actual reality of what really goes on within established, reputable shops. The lion share of reputable shops and competent stringers wouldn’t ever do something like you are asserting most of us would do. Those few who might, well, you shouldn’t be taking your stuff there, and they ought not expect to be in business for long.

This cuts both ways, too. Suppose you brought me a racquet to string, and you provided a set of string. The string pops during the job, through no fault of my own. I call you to let you know. You ask for free string. I explain that, unfortunately, since you provided your own string, we cannot warranty your string. You balk and demand we replace your string, free of charge. At that point I politely request that you to come pick up your racquet at your convenience and take it elsewhere, and not to come back. I can do that without any reservations, because I have hundreds of happy, repeat customers who are literally beating down my door to get their racquets serviced. Most of whom, I might add, don’t have ill conceived notions about how the business works.

If you want to provide your own string, this is the risk the customer takes. Don’t like it? Buy your string from the shop, or string your own racquets. Otherwise, get off my lawn.
 
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Yamin

Semi-Pro
If you want to provide your own string, this is the risk the customer takes. Don’t like it? Buy your string from the shop, or string your own racquets. Otherwise, get off my lawn.
I think you're failing to see what happened and ignoring everything that has been said thus far. If I'm coming to you for the first time, you say everything is great, strangely verify the string is fine, you haven't mentioned anything about liability being on the customer for a string, then magically a string has been popped and you want the full labor? You're not willing to work anything out or attempt to help? If nothing else we're having an altercation because it seems suspicious and you're a person without any integrity.

From any customer's perspective you're a crook lol.

Once again don't see why you're defending random shops in other areas that are reputable? Who cares. Not the topic. I'm not personally attacking "stringers" I'm saying in my area there aren't many good ones that aren't working out of a club.
 
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am1899

Hall of Fame
I think you're failing to see what happened and ignoring everything that has been said thus far. If I'm coming to you for the first time, you say everything is great, strangely verify the string is fine, you haven't mentioned anything about liability being on the customer for a string, then magically a string has been popped and you want the full labor? You're not willing to work anything out or attempt to help? If nothing else we're having an altercation because it seems suspicious and you're a person without any integrity.

From any customer's perspective you're a crook lol.

Once again don't see why you're defending random shops in other areas that are reputable? Who cares. Not the topic.
I’m not failing to see anything. I’m concerned that you can’t read.

I’ve said several times that if the mistake was my fault (as the stringer), you shouldn’t have to pay an extra dime. So taking your example, if you were a new customer, and if I didn’t adequately explain our policies up front - especially those about customer provided string - and something happened, you can bet I’m going to eat it and make the situation right. (I would have thought that last bit was obvious, but apparently not).

For some reason, you don’t comprehend or accept that if you bring your own supplies to someone to do a job for you...and your supplies suck, that that is a you problem, not a me problem.
 

jim e

Legend
Glad your not one of my players I string for.
Most of the players I string for are very grateful and appreciate what I provide.
You would be one of the ones I would have to send elsewhere, as I have no tolerance for people with your attitude.
@am1899 , some people like Yamin, you just cannot reason with. People like him should just bring their racquet to a big box store and get a careless stringer, then he would be at home with his sh*t attitude.
 
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Yamin

Semi-Pro
I’m not failing to see anything. I’m concerned that you can’t read.

I’ve said several times that if the mistake was my fault (as the stringer), you shouldn’t have to pay an extra dime. So taking your example, if you were a new customer, and if I didn’t adequately explain our policies up front - especially those about customer provided string - and something happened, you can bet I’m going to eat it and make the situation right. (I would have thought that last bit was obvious, but apparently not).

For some reason, you don’t comprehend or accept that if you bring your own supplies to someone to do a job for you...and your supplies suck, that that is a you problem, not a me problem.
Nope. Issue is not on my end as this is exactly what I have been saying for every single post, and haven't said otherwise lol. Good to see we're in agreement...
 

blablavla

G.O.A.T.
Nope. Issue is not on my end as this is exactly what I have been saying for every single post, and haven't said otherwise lol. Good to see we're in agreement...
the issue is not on your end if you can prove that the string wasn't faulty, if you can't get out of here

where have you seen a stringer thoroughly inspecting 12 m of the string? if this is not natural gut?
and in case of other materials, it can look ok, and still snap, simply happens if you string enough times

so, no buddy, if you bring your strings, you take the risk if they snap
 

FIRETennis

Professional
nope

1. as pointed out by others, there are storage conditions, and some other factors
if this was out of stringer control, then why would the stringer be accountable?

2. there is price vs cost
the price that you pay for strings let's say at tennis warehouse, isn't necessarily the cost for the stringer
- it can be that you buy a single set, while stringer buys in reels
- it can be that you buy at the retail price, while the stringer might have access to deliveries at same or similar price like tennis warehouse for example
- or it could be a mix of both, say the stringer purchases reels at the business-to-business price

in this case, the margin that the stringer is making, is not only a nice addition for the labor fee the stringer charges, but as well is covering among other things, the risk of the string snaping
so, you buy the job + strings from the stringer, it's none of your worries how many sets / meters of string they needed
if you brought your own strings, and they happened to be faulty, then it is your responsibility
I understand you don't want to be responsible for a string that might have been kept in a moldy garage for 10 years and the reluctance to string client's own string however, you still did not address what is the cost difference to you if you were to replace it.

Case 1: Customer comes with own Tecnifibre TGV reel, it breaks while you pull tension or during a knot. You put a new one from your own reel (which costs you $13 a piece wholesale). Happy customer. Unhappy stringer wallet.
Case 2: Customer comes and asks for Tecnifibre TGV which you carry, it breaks while you pull tension or during a knot. You put a new one from your own reel (which costs you $13 a piece wholesale). Happy customer. Unhappy stringer wallet.
Case 3: Customer comes with own Tecnifibre TGV reel, it breaks while you pull tension or during a knot. You give back the empty racket before his match - maybe you are more courteous than the OP's shop and actually call him and offer some options or a heads up and charge no labor. Unhappy customer. Happy stringer wallet.

What is the difference between Case 1 and Case 2 besides 'the policy'?
 

jim e

Legend
Case 1. Customer string, you said reel, who knows how it was kept, possible in trunk for a while ,golf clubs hit reel in trunk, etc. String breaks no fault of stringer, customer purchased, customer responsibility. No reason stringer to eat this!
Customer purchase string, customer can hassle with manufacturer for possible refund, not stringers headache, stringer did not purchase that string

Case 2. Stringer supplies, stringer responsible. Stringer uses his string to restring and make right. Stringer can try to contact manufacturer If stringer desires. Possible can get some reimbursement, depends on manufacturer and stringer persistence.

Policy and principal of the subject.
You just don't get it do you?
 
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am1899

Hall of Fame
Nope. Issue is not on my end as this is exactly what I have been saying for every single post, and haven't said otherwise lol. Good to see we're in agreement...
You’re entitled to your opinion of course. But good luck finding any reputable stringer or shop who will share that viewpoint.
 

am1899

Hall of Fame
Case 1. Customer string, you said reel, who knows how it was kept, possible in trunk for a while ,golf clubs hit reel in trunk, etc. String breaks no fault of stringer, customer purchased, customer responsibility. No reason stringer to eat this!
Case 2. Stringer supplies, stringer responsible. Stringer uses his string to restring and make right. Stringer can try to contact manufacturer If stringer desires. Possible can get some reimbursement, depends on manufacturer and stringer persistence.

Policy and principal of the subject.
You just don't get it do you?
Couldn’t have said it better @jim e. And to add, how Jim outlined it is generally accepted practice across the industry. I don’t know any shop in my area (or anywhere else for that matter) who would handle those scenarios any different. Anyone who thinks they should handle it differently, respectfully, doesn’t know what they’re talking about.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
I have a practically new CP machine. If I rent my machine to you for a fee and the machine breaks before you finish, do I get to keep your rental fee and charge you to have my machine repaired? Should I be able to sue you for loss of revenue? Who pays for the ruined string?
 

Yamin

Semi-Pro
I’ve said several times that if the mistake was my fault (as the stringer), you shouldn’t have to pay an extra dime. So taking your example, if you were a new customer, and if I didn’t adequately explain our policies up front - especially those about customer provided string - and something happened, you can bet I’m going to eat it and make the situation right. (I would have thought that last bit was obvious, but apparently not).
This is exactly what I have been saying for every single post, and haven't said otherwise lol. Good to see we're in agreement...
You’re entitled to your opinion of course. But good luck finding any reputable stringer or shop who will share that viewpoint.

????????? This is called clownery. How do you disagree with your own viewpoint?
 
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esgee48

G.O.A.T.
I tell my clients that if they provide the strings from their stash, there is no warranty or guarantee that the frame will be strung. They can accept this view or go somewhere else. I do not really care since I turn down more requests than accept for stringing.
 

puppybutts

Rookie
i'm not a stringer - can someone tell me how common QA defects are for brand new strings? i would have thought it's rather unlikely for a string to be ready to break fresh out of the package, but it sounds like people are implying here that it's more likely for there to be a QA defect than for an experienced stringer to make a mistake in a routine string task.

i've been testing different strings and will be ready to buy a reel soon....it's making me nervous. is it possible for example for the first half of my reel to be good, then the second half is bad and the retailer I buy it from doesn't want to refund me because I used half of it already and too much time has passed?
 

jim e

Legend
If you get a reel, and keep it in your trunk for a long time, then throw your golf clubs on top of it, then give reel to your stringer, you may have an issue.
And yes, once in a great great while, a defective set can occur, as quality control is not 100 percent.
 

AceyMan

Semi-Pro
OK I didn't know it was a hobby, I understood you were a professional stringer running a stringing business or shop, sorry!
One can have a second gig and still be a professional in that domain.

Wrap your head around that.

/Acey
 
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am1899

Hall of Fame
i'm not a stringer - can someone tell me how common QA defects are for brand new strings? i would have thought it's rather unlikely for a string to be ready to break fresh out of the package, but it sounds like people are implying here that it's more likely for there to be a QA defect than for an experienced stringer to make a mistake in a routine string task.

i've been testing different strings and will be ready to buy a reel soon....it's making me nervous. is it possible for example for the first half of my reel to be good, then the second half is bad and the retailer I buy it from doesn't want to refund me because I used half of it already and too much time has passed?
QA defects vary in severity and frequency brand to brand. Like anything else, you get what you pay for. If you buy a cheap reel from China, I would advise managing your expectations. OTOH if you pay top dollar for a premium reel of string, you’d be right to expect top notch quality. Even then though, I once had an entire batch of string from a top manufacturer...all of which the mfg eventually concluded was defective. The mfg replaced it all, free of charge. Believe it was on the order of 20 sets.

I don’t know that I’d go so far as to say QA defects would generally outpace stringer errors. (Actually, in a lot of cases I would think it would be the other way around). But it does depend on the quality of string and the experience of the stringer.

As for buying a reel, if you buy it from a licensed retailer, you’ve got nothing to worry about. (I wouldn’t a buy reel off the auction site, for example). I’ve never seen nor heard about any reel where the first half was good and the second half was bad. Pretty sure that’s not a thing.
 
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am1899

Hall of Fame
You must have a queue of customers out the door!
He does. I assure you.

Stringer needs to procure your string and give you a strung finished job, possibly with a discounted or free labor for the inconvenience and extra time. If stringer does not care for procuring the string, he should pay for the string cost which he/she broke and not charge any labor if all they are giving back to you is an empty frame.
Assuming the policy was explained up front, then no, LOL.

Ya’ll can keep living in your fantasy land if you wish. But this isn’t how this business works. No reputable technician nor shop - be it a tennis shop, automobile service center, sewing machine repair shop, whatever...is going to stand behind parts you supply, period. If your parts fail, that’s on you, and it’s your problem alone to deal with. Man alive!

Edit: just to be clear about the labor charge, as I said before - I do agree that OP’s stringer was incorrect to try to charge for that twice. I would only charge labor once - once the job was completed successfully.
 
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Arak

Hall of Fame
I didn’t read all the replies, but to me it’s very simple. You buy the string from the stringer, he’s responsible to give you back your strung racket at the specifications you requested. You give your string to the stringer, he is not responsible for any accidents, even when it is a mistake on his part. However, the stringer should forfeit his fee should any accident happen.
 

am1899

Hall of Fame
Case 1: Customer comes with own Tecnifibre TGV reel, it breaks while you pull tension or during a knot. You put a new one from your own reel (which costs you $13 a piece wholesale). Happy customer. Unhappy stringer wallet.
If I (the stringer) didn’t cause the string to break, nope, not happening.

Case 2: Customer comes and asks for Tecnifibre TGV which you carry, it breaks while you pull tension or during a knot. You put a new one from your own reel (which costs you $13 a piece wholesale). Happy customer. Unhappy stringer wallet.
Yup. My string, my problem.

Case 3: Customer comes with own Tecnifibre TGV reel, it breaks while you pull tension or during a knot. You give back the empty racket before his match - maybe you are more courteous than the OP's shop and actually call him and offer some options or a heads up and charge no labor. Unhappy customer. Happy stringer wallet.
I would definitely call immediately upon the issue presenting itself. Certainly wouldn’t be my wish to leave the customer hanging with an unstrung racquet, right before a match as you say. I’d absolutely want to rectify the situation for the customer. I’m just not going to replace string that didn’t come out of my inventory, assuming of course I didn’t do something to cause it to break. If I thought I did cause the string to break, I would replace the string at no cost to the customer.

What is the difference between Case 1 and Case 2 besides 'the policy'?
The difference is where the string came from. If the string comes out of my inventory, I know it was purchased directly from the manufacturer and then I know it has been stored in a cool, dry place.

Your string that you provided, who the heck knows where it came from, whether or not it’s fake, whether or not it’s been in your trunk, in a damp basement, chewed by your dog, etc.

Don’t get me wrong though, if I screw up and nick the set of string you provided (regardless of the concerns laid out above), that’s my fault and my fault alone...and I will make it right at my expense.
 
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FIRETennis

Professional
If I (the stringer) didn’t cause the string to break, nope, not happening.



Yup. My string, my problem.



I would definitely call immediately upon the issue presenting itself. Certainly wouldn’t be my wish to leave the customer hanging with an unstrung racquet, right before a match as you say. I’d absolutely want to rectify the situation for the customer. I’m just not going to replace string that didn’t come out of my inventory, assuming of course I didn’t do something to cause it to break. If I thought I did cause the string to break, I would replace the string at no cost to the customer.



The difference is where the string came from. If the string comes out of my inventory, I know it was purchased directly from the manufacturer and then I know it has been stored in a cool, dry place.

Your string that you provided, who the heck knows where it came from, whether or not it’s fake, whether or not it’s been in your trunk, in a damp basement, chewed by your dog, etc.

Don’t get me wrong though, if I screw up and nick the set of string you provided (regardless of the concerns laid out above), that’s my fault and my fault alone...and I will make it right at my expense.
So it's just due to 'principle' why you would not replace the customer's string because they maybe kept their $300 reel in a hot car for a year or so and give back and empty frame and tell him/her to take a hike to the manufacturer. I understood, thanks for clarifying.

Just out of curiosity, have @esgee48 @am1899 or @jim e ever in your stringing career had a Luxilon string (from your own reel/sets) break while pulling tension or tying a knot and have you successfully challenged it as manufacturer defect and got a replacement from Luxilon? How about with natural gut from any of the major brands (Babolat, Wilson/Luxilon, Klip, Pacific) ?
 
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FIRETennis

Professional
Case 1. Customer string, you said reel, who knows how it was kept, possible in trunk for a while ,golf clubs hit reel in trunk, etc. String breaks no fault of stringer, customer purchased, customer responsibility. No reason stringer to eat this!
Customer purchase string, customer can hassle with manufacturer for possible refund, not stringers headache, stringer did not purchase that string

Case 2. Stringer supplies, stringer responsible. Stringer uses his string to restring and make right. Stringer can try to contact manufacturer If stringer desires. Possible can get some reimbursement, depends on manufacturer and stringer persistence.

Policy and principal of the subject.
You just don't get it do you?
No, you just don't get it.
Case 3 is what you chose to do by turning Case 1 into Case 3. Basically tell the customer to take a hike because you broke their string while stringing it, their problem (or the manufacturer problem).
My question was what is the difference to you, financially, between Case 1 and Case 2. Aren't they the same exact thing, if you were to make an exception from your "policy"?

Case 1: Customer comes with own Tecnifibre TGV reel, it breaks while you pull tension or during a knot. You put a new one from your own reel (which costs you $13 a piece wholesale). Happy customer. Unhappy stringer wallet.
Case 2: Customer comes and asks for Tecnifibre TGV which you carry, it breaks while you pull tension or during a knot. You put a new one from your own reel (which costs you $13 a piece wholesale). Happy customer. Unhappy stringer wallet.
Case 3: Customer comes with own Tecnifibre TGV reel, it breaks while you pull tension or during a knot. You give back the empty racket before his match - maybe you are more courteous than the OP's shop and actually call him and offer some options or a heads up and charge no labor. Unhappy customer. Happy stringer wallet.
 

FIRETennis

Professional
The "professional" stringers in this thread are really something else...
Have any of you guys ever strung at a tournament like @ProStringing @uk_skippy?
You do realize 99.9% of players come with their own reels.
Do they buy the strings from you or from the shop where the machine is setup for you to use?
What happens when you break their string because you pull the knot too tight by accident?
Do you just give them back the frame before the match empty or casually take another string without letting them know or do you inform them that it broke and still charge them labor?

I've only had this happen once at a tournament that I've played, and the stringer told me upon picking up the frame what happened and did not charge the labor since they broke my string.
They took responsibility for what happened by forfeiting their labor cost ($15) even though they had to essentially string twice, offsetting my string loss ($16).
It was a reel of Luxilon ALU Power 125 and no, not a manufacturer defect and I don't leave a $300 set of strings in moldy basement or hot car or give to my dog as a chew toy. :-D
 
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puppybutts

Rookie
QA defects vary in severity and frequency brand to brand. Like anything else, you get what you pay for. If you buy a cheap reel from China, I would advise managing your expectations. OTOH if you pay top dollar for a premium reel of string, you’d be right to expect top notch quality. Even then though, I once had an entire batch of string from a top manufacturer...all of which the mfg eventually concluded was defective. The mfg replaced it all, free of charge. Believe it was on the order of 20 sets.

I don’t know that I’d go so far as to say QA defects would generally outpace stringer errors. (Actually, in a lot of cases I would think it would be the other way around). But it does depend on the quality of string and the experience of the stringer.

As for buying a reel, if you buy it from a licensed retailer, you’ve got nothing to worry about. (I wouldn’t a buy reel off the auction site, for example). I’ve never seen nor heard about any reel where the first half was good and the second half was bad. Pretty sure that’s not a thing.
is there even a way to know where the strings are manufactured? a lot of european or american companies state something vague in their "About" regarding multiple factories/partners in multiple countries, or i hear a lot that all the brands share the same string factories. not sure what cheap reel from China you're talking about, but what about even a budget reel from say a European brand like Kirschbaum? would you recommend against that? i was hoping max power rough would be a cheaper alternative with better tension maintenance to luxilon element rough.

but ok, that's good to know for some peace of mind. this thread made me a little paranoid o_O

i didn't think it was a thing....but i was thinking, if they can produce a whole reel with no issue, why are there QA defects at all? would issues only arise in between production sessions when the machines and factory lines are not in use? what if the string comes out like a soft serve ice cream machine...watery and defective at the beginning, thick and creamy afterward, or sometimes comes out in uneven spurts instead of a nice swirl? :D i want ice cream now
 

blablavla

G.O.A.T.
i'm not a stringer - can someone tell me how common QA defects are for brand new strings? i would have thought it's rather unlikely for a string to be ready to break fresh out of the package, but it sounds like people are implying here that it's more likely for there to be a QA defect than for an experienced stringer to make a mistake in a routine string task.

i've been testing different strings and will be ready to buy a reel soon....it's making me nervous. is it possible for example for the first half of my reel to be good, then the second half is bad and the retailer I buy it from doesn't want to refund me because I used half of it already and too much time has passed?
it happens rarely, but it does
then, different brands might have different QC standards, so my experience, based on the strings I use might be different from your experience with other strings
 

blablavla

G.O.A.T.
I understand you don't want to be responsible for a string that might have been kept in a moldy garage for 10 years and the reluctance to string client's own string however, you still did not address what is the cost difference to you if you were to replace it.

Case 1: Customer comes with own Tecnifibre TGV reel, it breaks while you pull tension or during a knot. You put a new one from your own reel (which costs you $13 a piece wholesale). Happy customer. Unhappy stringer wallet.
Case 2: Customer comes and asks for Tecnifibre TGV which you carry, it breaks while you pull tension or during a knot. You put a new one from your own reel (which costs you $13 a piece wholesale). Happy customer. Unhappy stringer wallet.
Case 3: Customer comes with own Tecnifibre TGV reel, it breaks while you pull tension or during a knot. You give back the empty racket before his match - maybe you are more courteous than the OP's shop and actually call him and offer some options or a heads up and charge no labor. Unhappy customer. Happy stringer wallet.

What is the difference between Case 1 and Case 2 besides 'the policy'?
I see some folks here conveniently ignored the example that I brought.
so, @FIRETennis @Yamin and @TinaDash can I kindly ask you to answer this example?

- you hire a team of people to build you a house
- you provide materials, and pay them a fixed amount of money for the labor, so it doesn't matter for you if they do their job in 1 week or if it takes them 5 years
- at the beginning of day 1, when they come to start the construction works, there is part of materials so they start the works
- then a point in time comes, when they use up the available materials, but the rest of materials isn't delivered

Question. What do you think this team will do?
a. they will wait an eternity for the rest of materials to be delivered, without asking more money from you
b. they will ask you to pay for every day that they are available, but can't work because the materials are not there
c. they will tell you to f*c* off and will move on to other projects
 

blablavla

G.O.A.T.
The "professional" stringers in this thread are really something else...
Have any of you guys ever strung at a tournament like @ProStringing @uk_skippy?
You do realize 99.9% of players come with their own reels.
Do they buy the strings from you or from the shop where the machine is setup for you to use?
What happens when you break their string because you pull the knot too tight by accident?
Do you just give them back the frame before the match empty or casually take another string without letting them know or do you inform them that it broke and still charge them labor?

I've only had this happen once at a tournament that I've played, and the stringer told me upon picking up the frame what happened and did not charge the labor since they broke my string.
They took responsibility for what happened by forfeiting their labor cost ($15) even though they had to essentially string twice, offsetting my string loss ($16).
It was a reel of Luxilon ALU Power 125 and no, not a manufacturer defect and I don't leave a $300 set of strings in moldy basement or hot car or give to my dog as a chew toy. :-D
what is your best guess,
1. when a pro player at tournament needs the racket strung, do they give only 1 set (12m) to the stringer? or perhaps a reel?
2. do you think @ProStringing or @uk_skippy never seen a string snapping from the player's reel?
2.1 if it happened along their career, what do you think happened, they had to purchase the replacement string from their pocket? or did they use the strings from the player reel? or did they use the reel provided by the tournament?
 

jim e

Legend
@FIRETennis @Yamin
What is your issue?
If you don't care for a business policy you can move on and go to another stringer.
I have no problems with that at all
No one is forcing you to use a particular stringer that you do not care for their policy.
Do you think if you cry and stomp your feet that a business will change their policy?
Get a grip on reality!
Time to move on, this thread is getting old.
 

jim e

Legend
@FIRETennis , to answer one of your questions, yes I had one of those major gut manufacturer strings break due to string defect. It was my inventory, so I just removed strings normal method and restrung at my expense.
I layer emailed company. They much later responded that they wanted entire string bed cut out as one piece sent to them along with package it came in along with invoice where I purchased it. Strings were already cut out, so that request was not going to happen, so I swallowed the cost. If customer brings in one of those sets , it it their issue to deal with manufacturer if it happens with their set , not mine. They bought it, they deal with it .
You need to deal with reality!
Like I said, time to move on, this thread had gone on long enough.
 

am1899

Hall of Fame
The "professional" stringers in this thread are really something else...
Have any of you guys ever strung at a tournament like @ProStringing @uk_skippy?
I haven’t strung at a world tour level or grand slam event.

I have however strung at ITF pro circuit and USTA junior national tournaments.

You do realize 99.9% of players come with their own reels.
Most do. 99.9% is high, especially beneath world tour level.

Do they buy the strings from you or from the shop where the machine is setup for you to use?
I thought 99.9% brought their own reels?

What happens when you break their string because you pull the knot too tight by accident?
Couldn’t tell ya, I’ve never broken string by pulling a knot too tight. Not once. (I’m a “professional,” remember)?

Do you just give them back the frame before the match empty or casually take another string without letting them know or do you inform them that it broke and still charge them labor?
Obviously not.

I've only had this happen once at a tournament that I've played, and the stringer told me upon picking up the frame what happened and did not charge the labor since they broke my string.
They took responsibility for what happened by forfeiting their labor cost ($15) even though they had to essentially string twice, offsetting my string loss ($16).
Good on them. Same thing happened at an ITF tournament - stringer screwed up, and the racquet had to be restrung. The string was pulled from his reel, but we ate labor.

It was a reel of Luxilon ALU Power 125 and no, not a manufacturer defect and I don't leave a $300 set of strings in moldy basement or hot car or give to my dog as a chew toy. :-D
Well congratulations. But if you came into my shop, how do I know your string is free from defects and has been stored in a proper place? I just have to take your word for it? By the way, the 20 defective sets I referred to was Babolat Origin. So, it can happen - even with premium string brands.
 
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