Do u ever wish you were a PRo player

dgold44

G.O.A.T.
I admit sometimes I do quite a bit.
How amazing would that be to show up at the US open in the second week with tens of thousands of people going crazy. Millions watching. People yelling your name.

I am sure the traveling would be horrible after a few years and I hate hotels.
I would probably stick to USA and Europe only tourneys and avoid the rest of them.

Then again, I do not have to worry because I am a 4.0 peasant player. My game would be like Brad Gilbert lol
 

LeeD

Bionic Poster
Pressure to perform, day after day, solo, would be overbearing.
Juggling practice time, match time, food consumption, airline travel itinerary, hotel stays, transportation, laundry, and a myrad of coordination hassles and strife, both personal and scheduling, would be a daunting project for anyone but the most individualistic take charge kind of person.
 

dgold44

G.O.A.T.
I think it would be great from age 20-27 only

On the 4.0 circuit I only have to play a weekend every 4 months and indoors.

I could not imagine playing outside in burning sun with that intensity
 

tennisjon

Professional
I always thought I wanted to. I had paid for my lessons from the time I was 16. I couldn't play tournaments when I was younger since they wouldn't drive me and I didn't get my license until I was a senior in h.s. After college I kinda went off on my parents that they never really supported my tennis. Even though I played D1, I wasn't under scholarship and said had they invested more time and money like my friends' parents did, I could have gone to college for free. So, for a graduation present, they sent me to an academy to finally train properly. After about 4 days, I realized not only did I not have the talent to play at that level, I did not have the fitness nor internal drive that it necessitated. I was grateful for the opportunity to train with some really great players, but it was also a humbling experience. From that point on, I never complained again.
 

1HBHfanatic

Legend
only when i get up in the morning to go to work. my work sucks so a tennis pro player gig sounds like a dream. haha.. lucky are thoes who have that chance to PLAY for a living..
 

eelhc

Hall of Fame
I admit sometimes I do quite a bit.
How amazing would that be to show up at the US open in the second week with tens of thousands of people going crazy. Millions watching. People yelling your name.

I am sure the traveling would be horrible after a few years and I hate hotels.
I would probably stick to USA and Europe only tourneys and avoid the rest of them.

Then again, I do not have to worry because I am a 4.0 peasant player. My game would be like Brad Gilbert lol
Sorry to bust your bubble but only a few dozen people in the world at any one time (both ATP and WTA) live that life. Most pros will never break into the top 100 and will struggle from one event to another. In fact, most pros will never make it past ITF.

Even in the top 50 for most events will play in a small, empty arena and their matches will not be broadcast.

In any professional sport, only a tiny fraction of a percentage of pro athletes will life the glamorous life.

What you are really wishing is for the life of a GOAT.
 

gmatheis

Hall of Fame
I always thought I wanted to. I had paid for my lessons from the time I was 16. I couldn't play tournaments when I was younger since they wouldn't drive me and I didn't get my license until I was a senior in h.s. After college I kinda went off on my parents that they never really supported my tennis. Even though I played D1, I wasn't under scholarship and said had they invested more time and money like my friends' parents did, I could have gone to college for free. So, for a graduation present, they sent me to an academy to finally train properly. After about 4 days, I realized not only did I not have the talent to play at that level, I did not have the fitness nor internal drive that it necessitated. I was grateful for the opportunity to train with some really great players, but it was also a humbling experience. From that point on, I never complained again.
We see the glamorous side of tennis, playing the tournament, winning the trophies and prize money etc.

What we don't see is the side of tennis where you have a schedule that puts you not only on the court every day but also in the gym for strength training as well as doing cardio. We don't see how the lower level players barely scrape by, staying in cheap nasty hotels (often sharing to save money), playing the lower level tournaments on horrible courts for very little money (and that's only if you are winning) to try and get the points needed to get into larger tournaments.

I don't imagine I would last more than a day or two on a schedule of a touring tennis pro.

So you hit the nail on the head ... it takes not only the opportunity, but the drive and talent, day in and day out, year after year.
 

G A S

Hall of Fame
Sorry to bust your bubble but only a few dozen people in the world at any one time (both ATP and WTA) live that life. Most pros will never break into the top 100 and will struggle from one event to another. In fact, most pros will never make it past ITF.

Even in the top 50 for most events will play in a small, empty arena and their matches will not be broadcast.

In any professional sport, only a tiny fraction of a percentage of pro athletes will life the glamorous life.

What you are really wishing is for the life of a GOAT.
true, but it is basic math, nothing more nothing less. But who needs to win all that money? only to a certain level, though, I could want something like that, enough money to live a good life in peace. But being famous is the worst part of it anyway, hahaha, it is the biggest setback.
 

G A S

Hall of Fame
We see the glamorous side of tennis, playing the tournament, winning the trophies and prize money etc.

What we don't see is the side of tennis where you have a schedule that puts you not only on the court every day but also in the gym for strength training as well as doing cardio. We don't see how the lower level players barely scrape by, staying in cheap nasty hotels (often sharing to save money), playing the lower level tournaments on horrible courts for very little money (and that's only if you are winning) to try and get the points needed to get into larger tournaments.

I don't imagine I would last more than a day or two on a schedule of a touring tennis pro.

So you hit the nail on the head ... it takes not only the opportunity, but the drive and talent, day in and day out, year after year.
it takes flying in a airplane every day too, all that hassle and the neverending thought of crashing planes too, I don't know how could anyone ignore this though.
 

G A S

Hall of Fame
I admit sometimes I do quite a bit.
How amazing would that be to show up at the US open in the second week with tens of thousands of people going crazy. Millions watching. People yelling your name.

I am sure the traveling would be horrible after a few years and I hate hotels.
I would probably stick to USA and Europe only tourneys and avoid the rest of them.

Then again, I do not have to worry because I am a 4.0 peasant player. My game would be like Brad Gilbert lol
everyone fly by plane, not a problem because it is fast, but the problem is a crashing airplane, if only ultra efficient anti-crash systems existed.
 

G A S

Hall of Fame
Pressure to perform, day after day, solo, would be overbearing.
Juggling practice time, match time, food consumption, airline travel itinerary, hotel stays, transportation, laundry, and a myrad of coordination hassles and strife, both personal and scheduling, would be a daunting project for anyone but the most individualistic take charge kind of person.
individualistic in what sense? with all the public watching, can't be true at all.
 

LoboR1

Rookie
We see the glamorous side of tennis, playing the tournament, winning the trophies and prize money etc.

What we don't see is the side of tennis where you have a schedule that puts you not only on the court every day but also in the gym for strength training as well as doing cardio. We don't see how the lower level players barely scrape by, staying in cheap nasty hotels (often sharing to save money), playing the lower level tournaments on horrible courts for very little money (and that's only if you are winning) to try and get the points needed to get into larger tournaments.

I don't imagine I would last more than a day or two on a schedule of a touring tennis pro.

So you hit the nail on the head ... it takes not only the opportunity, but the drive and talent, day in and day out, year after year.
Yep....most people don't have the talent or the drive to get through the hard work that is required. I also think it would be kind of a mind-f#@$ if you were ridiculously successful. All the wealth and fame from hitting a little fuzzy yellow ball over a net, meanwhile, surgeons and physicists etc...that actually improve life for people, live in relative obscurity with much less financial security, would be unsettling.
 

sovertennis

Professional
If you want to see what the life of a touring pro is like for the vast majority of them, go to a $15k Challenger or Futures event. Not much glamour there.
 

J_R_B

Hall of Fame
Sure, I would have loved to do that. It was quickly clear to me that it was not possible, though. I went to a high school where we lost 2 matches in the 4 years I was there, won 3 county championships, and since they instituted the state team playoffs, they have won 6 state titles. We were a big fish in our little pond, and still everyone on the team understood that there was absolutely no chance any of us would be a pro. The #1 on the team tried to walk on at Duke and left after one or two practices because they were playing at a totally different level.
 

eelhc

Hall of Fame
true, but it is basic math, nothing more nothing less. But who needs to win all that money? only to a certain level, though, I could want something like that, enough money to live a good life in peace. But being famous is the worst part of it anyway, hahaha, it is the biggest setback.
There are much easier and less stressful ways to make much more money than almost all of the touring pros will make in their entire career if one works as hard on their studies and work as the top 100 players do... ane doesn't need god given athletic talent or physique.
 

G A S

Hall of Fame
There are much easier and less stressful ways to make much more money than almost all of the touring pros will make in their entire career if one works as hard on their studies and work as the top 100 players do... ane doesn't need god given athletic talent or physique.
certainly it is better to focus on what is not so uncertain as tennis to get the money, I think that what stress the players the most though is the sponsor, if the player was really good so that he knew he would win, he could go alone, cash in some trophies and go away, a very short experience. Obviously never happened though, haha
 

eelhc

Hall of Fame
certainly it is better to focus on what is not so uncertain as tennis to get the money, I think that what stress the players the most though is the sponsor, if the player was really good so that he knew he would win, he could go alone, cash in some trophies and go away, a very short experience. Obviously never happened though, haha
If you all 4 majors in 1 year and decided to retire... that still would be far less than what can be attained by studying and working hard.
 

G A S

Hall of Fame
If you all 4 majors in 1 year and decided to retire... that still would be far less than what can be attained by studying and working hard.
that can only be why there is such a rush in the circuit to get the most out of it. all the money got by being in a sponsorship... No one is gonna refuse a sponsor indeed. Yeah, better to work instead. Only if there was some kind of "certainty" for the success on the tour.
 

eelhc

Hall of Fame
If you all 4 majors in 1 year and decided to retire... that still would be far less than what can be attained by studying and working hard.
I don't think so
Think through it... Consider the taxes and the mechanics of repatriating the earnings. Would it be enough to retire? For life? I don't consider myself wealthy and I'm not young but I certainly hope to have earned a lot more by the time I'm done.
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
Think through it... Consider the taxes and the mechanics of repatriating the earnings. Would it be enough to retire? For life? I don't consider myself wealthy and I'm not young but I certainly hope to have earned a lot more by the time I'm done.
It is not just 6 to 8 million dollars, out of which say you got to keep 3 million. It is also the endorsements that you will have, unless you are outright obnoxious and uncompromising.
 

eelhc

Hall of Fame
It is not just 6 to 8 million dollars, out of which say you got to keep 3 million. It is also the endorsements that you will have, unless you are outright obnoxious and uncompromising.
The poster said he just wants to win and retire into obscurity...

How does not doing endorsements make one obnoxious and uncompromising?

Being well off and keeping one's anonymity is priceless. Michael Jordan once commented that he wished he could take his kids to Disneyland.... or even just to the movies without wearing a disguise...

3~4 million at a young age invested well and living modestly could last a lifetime... I hope to do a lot better than that before I'm done.
 

Kasmatsu

Rookie
I always wanted to play pro doubles. Didn't know how to get started. Didn't know anybody that knew how to get started. There was no Google to search how to get started. Would be fun to live out of a van playing qualifiers during the European clay/grass season.
 

G A S

Hall of Fame
Think through it... Consider the taxes and the mechanics of repatriating the earnings. Would it be enough to retire? For life? I don't consider myself wealthy and I'm not young but I certainly hope to have earned a lot more by the time I'm done.
It is not just 6 to 8 million dollars, out of which say you got to keep 3 million. It is also the endorsements that you will have, unless you are outright obnoxious and uncompromising.
The poster said he just wants to win and retire into obscurity...

How does not doing endorsements make one obnoxious and uncompromising?

Being well off and keeping one's anonymity is priceless. Michael Jordan once commented that he wished he could take his kids to Disneyland.... or even just to the movies without wearing a disguise...

3~4 million at a young age invested well and living modestly could last a lifetime... I hope to do a lot better than that before I'm done.
all those taxes, would they eat away so much? ouch. Yeah, over a lifetime one can do much more money, but it is not like as soon as you got off the circuit not being really famous, you could not work in something to sum to the value you had gotten until that point, all adds up, and already having quite a bit would make all easier. I bet it is the trouble of travelling that is the most troublesome part of such a feat.
 

G A S

Hall of Fame
all the players are making endorsements, surely doing endorsement won't change the personality of a player.
 
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goran_ace

Hall of Fame
The life of a journeyman pro or up and comer is far from glamorous. Not everyone on the tour lives large like Rafa and Roger. I'd rather be a third string QB in the NFL with a contract.
 

Turbo-87

Legend
Not really. I would like to have the skills at times, I mean, who wouldn't? It takes a very special kind of person to be a pro and I am not that. You have to have the mind for it, the talent, and also be willing to sacrifice everything for the game. To me, it's JUST a game. :)
 

tennisjon

Professional
If you are the 100th best baseball player, basketball player, soccer player, golfer, football player, etc, you are considered wealthy and most likely will have a long career. For tennis, its only the elite of the elite that can make it profitable.
 

G A S

Hall of Fame
If you are the 100th best baseball player, basketball player, soccer player, golfer, football player, etc, you are considered wealthy and most likely will have a long career. For tennis, its only the elite of the elite that can make it profitable.
so many differences then, it is said that in tennis years and years of experience is even more important than the other sports.
 

silentkman

Professional
Only if I was in the top 30. Playing tennis in the lower levels in the ultimate grind. at that level, you probably qualify for public assistance. I actually feel sorry for them. playing minor league baseball is much better.
 

navigator

Hall of Fame
Only if I could be in the top 50 for at least a decade. Otherwise, after taxes, traveling expenses, agents/managers, etc... there isn't much, if anything, left. And the "romance" of playing and traveling the world probably gets very old after a few years of doing it on a shoestring budget. Trying to turn your avocation into your vocation often leaves you in a "be careful what you wish for" situation - you get sick of it. I much prefer my current profession.
 

silentkman

Professional
and baseball at low level gives you much money? baseball outside the US is almost nothing.
The team pays for everything in baseball for most part, traveling hotels etc. In tennis you all alone. The itf report indicates you have to be in the 200's to break even. Who wants to break even at a job? For the most part, its a waste of time.
 

Ihatetennis

Hall of Fame
I'm still young and have no shot at a life on the pro tour, having said that. I will probably try and play a futures tournament to see how I stack up against the minor leagues of tennis. If anything I really want to play doubles, that I think I could have a shot at. A shot meaning maybe winning a main draw match or two.

I wanted to be a pro since I was 7 but unfortunately there were no affordable academies near me. Since then I have been at some good academies and am now training a lot with some really great players, but not to the level of future pros.
 

LeeD

Bionic Poster
Sounds like a lot of immature 16 year old replying on this thread.
No sport is all roses and fame. The work required to get to that level is almost a lifetime of effort alone, and only for the chosen few.
While you might play for a crowd, that is exactly .5 percent of your time, while the other 90%, you're going about your schedule alone.
And fame? It takes only a minor cold, allergies, or personal issues to knock you out of several tournaments, meaning now you don't qualify for the remaining tourneys just due to bad luck or injury.
Probably around 20,000 5.5 and better players are looking towards playing tennis for a living. They have already spend 10+ years to get where they are, and only 200 are making money to cover expenses.
 

eelhc

Hall of Fame
If you are the 100th best baseball player, basketball player, soccer player, golfer, football player, etc, you are considered wealthy and most likely will have a long career. For tennis, its only the elite of the elite that can make it profitable.
And 1 injury away from having it all end... Football players have to deal with lasting effects of contact/concussion...

Really it's much easier to be just a decent doctor, lawyer, engineer, electrician, plumber... and play tennis for fun...
 

G A S

Hall of Fame
And 1 injury away from having it all end... Football players have to deal with lasting effects of contact/concussion...

Really it's much easier to be just a decent doctor, lawyer, engineer, electrician, plumber... and play tennis for fun...
yeah, 1 injury can indeed end it for good, luckly tennis is a non-contact sport, so less injuries compared to the other sports. Being a decent worker is indeed the easiest way, I concur.

Sounds like a lot of immature 16 year old replying on this thread.
No sport is all roses and fame. The work required to get to that level is almost a lifetime of effort alone, and only for the chosen few.
While you might play for a crowd, that is exactly .5 percent of your time, while the other 90%, you're going about your schedule alone.
And fame? It takes only a minor cold, allergies, or personal issues to knock you out of several tournaments, meaning now you don't qualify for the remaining tourneys just due to bad luck or injury.
Probably around 20,000 5.5 and better players are looking towards playing tennis for a living. They have already spend 10+ years to get where they are, and only 200 are making money to cover expenses.
so many hours of training through many many years since birth... many, many players competing, talking with casualty about going pro can indeed seem very foolish and immature, yeah...:???:
 

eelhc

Hall of Fame
yeah, 1 injury can indeed end it for good, luckly tennis is a non-contact sport, so less injuries compared to the other sports. Being a decent worker is indeed the easiest way, I concur.
Tell that to Del Potro... It doesn't look like he'll ever play top level tennis again. His career winnings re ~$15M + endorsements - expenses... He won't be rich but he'll be comfortable for life.
 

G A S

Hall of Fame
Tell that to Del Potro... It doesn't look like he'll ever play top level tennis again. His career winnings re ~$15M + endorsements - expenses... He won't be rich but he'll be comfortable for life.
It is possible to injury yourself only by walking slowly, some people trip... It's all about coordination not to fall, but injuries depend on how you play, so it is still possible not to get injuries... I can't say the same about contact sports though.

what happened to del potro is a shame, his game was good to watch...
 

dgold44

G.O.A.T.
I agree the life is very mentally and physically difficult. Not to mention the stress.
You really have to be in the top 50 to make the good money.
Plus Tennis players seem to age terribly- probably because of all that training in the burning sun.
 

Roddick85

Hall of Fame
Do I wish I was a pro player? In fantasy land sure. Who wouldn't want to be in the shoes of Federer. Most people come to the tournament just to see you, your practice sessions attract more spectators than minor tournaments. Hearing the crowd roar when you just hit a tweener or a hot shot at the US Open or at Wimbledon must be an unbelievable adrenaline rush. However, to be in the shoes of low ranked pro's? Nope, that life looks miserable, sorry.

Back to reality, I believe I had the talent to make it as a pro as well as the dedication to training etc...Would I have been able to manage the mental side of things, knowing what's at stake money wise and that if I lose, I might barely be able to survive? Not too sure about that. I think I'll be happy to just train and play at a high level as an amateur and maybe do a few tournaments here and there while having a job that can support my lifestyle.
 
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