Do vibration dampeners really do anything?

Tennis sprew

Semi-Pro
IMO, they don’t. However, does it have more effect on racquet/string specifics? I was using the clash 98 with solinco tour bite diamond rough, now I use pure aero 2019 with rpm blast 16. Thoughts?
 

DeeeFoo

New User
I think they do. I use rubber bands, and I can feel a small difference with and without them on my racquet.

If anything, they help reduce that annoying "ping" sound, which is more important to me.
 
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Yoneyama

Hall of Fame
And the SOUND is... wait for it... VIBRATION!

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Yeah but you cannot feel the vibration without a dampener (at least not in any racquet I have ever used), so calling them vibration dampeners can mislead a lot of people into thinking they will reduce vibrations that can be felt / cause pain. I
 

BlueB

Legend
Yeah but you cannot feel the vibration without a dampener (at least not in any racquet I have ever used), so calling them vibration dampeners can mislead a lot of people into thinking they will reduce vibrations that can be felt / cause pain. I
Actually, it's not the vibration, but impact shock, that causes the TE pain...

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ChrisG

Rookie
Have any of you ever hit with a racquet ? Or are you all using prostock foam filled models to not see and feel the difference made by a dampener ?
It’s about sound but also vibrations.
The only racquet that doesn’t need it is my PT630, all the other racquets I’ve own or hit with have benefited from a dampener
 

Yoneyama

Hall of Fame
Have any of you ever hit with a racquet ? Or are you all using prostock foam filled models to not see and feel the difference made by a dampener ?
It’s about sound but also vibrations.
The only racquet that doesn’t need it is my PT630, all the other racquets I’ve own or hit with have benefited from a dampener
I guess we all feel racquets differently. I have a huge list of sticks I have used in the past and I own about 20 at the moment as I like to experiment with different stuff (only play seriously with one model though).

Dampeners have made zero tactile difference on any frame for me, all they do for me is stop the ping sound.
 

joah310

Semi-Pro
I personally use dampeners on everything except for when I use my yonex vcore tour 97, I like the feel bettr with a dampener, but the spin potential seems to drop when I use the dampener. Its strung with a long dead solinco tour bite 20g. I do notice though that generally the higher the weight of the racket, the less problems without a dampener, but I perfer to use a dampener anyway.
 

esm

Professional
used to use it, but not anymore, especially when i started using the Angell racquets - the thump sound was just addictive with the dampener... lol
now i am using Blade 98, still not using the dampener. just dont mind the sounds anymore.... maybe it got to do with the foam filled racquets.
 

esgee48

Legend
Built-in dampeners that cover the entire throat ala Prince or older Heads do make a difference. Worm dampeners, especially the gel filled ones, also work. Ones that only cover the 2 mains, not so much.
 
What about these wide ones?

I am older now, so I feel I need to protect my arm/shoulders.
I got this Wilson shock trap hoping it might help a bit.



Would it be any more effective than a little ones that go over two strings?
 

TagUrIt

Hall of Fame
What about these wide ones?

I am older now, so I feel I need to protect my arm/shoulders.
I got this Wilson shock trap hoping it might help a bit.



Would it be any more effective than a little ones that go over two strings?
I used to use that very same dampener. Like most, I believed that it made a difference in vibration as well. It’s very good at muting the sound of the strings, but that’s about it.

A few months ago, I tried playing without one and it was like a whole new world of tennis. I felt more connected to the racquet and there was (obviously) much more feel. I haven’t used a dampener since.
 

BlueB

Legend
I used to use that very same dampener. Like most, I believed that it made a difference in vibration as well. It’s very good at muting the sound of the strings, but that’s about it.

A few months ago, I tried playing without one and it was like a whole new world of tennis. I felt more connected to the racquet and there was (obviously) much more feel. I haven’t used a dampener since.
You need to make up your mind... either it just mutes the sound, or it mutes the feel too?

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Rosstour

Hall of Fame
I question the sanity of anyone who can’t feel a difference. I cannot stand playing without one. But I realize not everyone is sensitive to everything.
 

BlueB

Legend
A few months ago, I tried playing without one and it was like a whole new world of tennis. I felt more connected to the racquet and there was (obviously) much more feel. since.
It mutes the sound, without a dampener you’re much more connected to your racquet.
Most of people use "feel" to describe something tactile. Connection to the racquet is via hand. Are you sure it is only the sound that it mutes, for you?

It is known that deaf people can "hear" the music by placing a hand on a piano. But it is not really the sound they feel. What is it?

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BlueB

Legend
Yes sound vibration, not racquet vibration. I have not heard of violin or guitar players getting tennis elbow:oops:
It is proven that tennis elbow is related mostly to the impact shock, overuse and bad technique.
My friend, a movie set sculptor, got it from carving. No vibrations involved there. Many other craftsmen get it too.

That sound vibration, you talk about, has to be caused by something vibrating in the racquet, no? Since the dampener is not in your ears but in the racquet, it has to actually stop some of the vibration before they become audible sound.

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BlueB

Legend
Inspired by the above, I challenge everyone to use industrial ear plugs and try their racquet with and without dampener.

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GBplayer

Hall of Fame
It is proven that tennis elbow is related mostly to the impact shock, overuse and bad technique.
My friend, a movie set sculptor, got it from carving. No vibrations involved there. Many other craftsmen get it too.

That sound vibration, you talk about, has to be caused by something vibrating in the racquet, no? Since the dampener is not in your ears but in the racquet, it has to actually stop some of the vibration before they become audible sound.

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I agree they stop audible sound, but also believe they do nothing to prevent vibration or impact stress that would cause arm problems. Just window dressing. All in the head and have no real purpose. But if you prefer the different sound, then personal choice.
 

TagUrIt

Hall of Fame
Most of people use "feel" to describe something tactile. Connection to the racquet is via hand. Are you sure it is only the sound that it mutes, for you?

It is known that deaf people can "hear" the music by placing a hand on a piano. But it is not really the sound they feel. What is it?

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I guess everyone has that one subject that they’re passionate about. Judging by your responses to the some of the posts here, maybe this is yours?

It’s fine, I’ll humor you, without the dampener I can hear my strokes better. I know exactly when I’m hitting flat and when I’m using topspin. I “feel” more connected to the racquet because there is more of vibration sensation in the racquet. Do dampeners prevent tennis elbow, no I don’t think so. Do they make the racquet strings vibrate less and allow for more sound? In my humble opinion, yes they do.
 
I used to use that very same dampener. Like most, I believed that it made a difference in vibration as well. It’s very good at muting the sound of the strings, but that’s about it.

A few months ago, I tried playing without one and it was like a whole new world of tennis. I felt more connected to the racquet and there was (obviously) much more feel. I haven’t used a dampener since.
noice
 

BlueB

Legend
I guess everyone has that one subject that they’re passionate about. Judging by your responses to the some of the posts here, maybe this is yours?

It’s fine, I’ll humor you, without the dampener I can hear my strokes better. I know exactly when I’m hitting flat and when I’m using topspin. I “feel” more connected to the racquet because there is more of vibration sensation in the racquet. Do dampeners prevent tennis elbow, no I don’t think so. Do they make the racquet strings vibrate less and allow for more sound? In my humble opinion, yes they do.
Then, basically we agree.
As for the TE, it wasn't even mentioned on the OP.

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KineticChain

Hall of Fame
it's pretty obvious they do something. you can hear an audible difference with and without one. many people can feel a vibration difference with and without one. vibrations on the string bed are changing in some way and to some extent due to the dampener. whether buying a djokovic smiley face dampener makes you hit like novak djokovic, we can leave that for a new thread.
 

WilPro

Rookie
Try it with a tennis ball machine. Set the damn thing to 85 mph. Add Topspin 3.

When I did that at first, I lost dampener and immediately I felt strong vibrations. Otherwise, if I don't get a strong ball from the other side of the net I could lose the dampener and not even know it.

So, it depends.
 

1HBHfanatic

Hall of Fame
I question the sanity of anyone who can’t feel a difference. I cannot stand playing without one. But I realize not everyone is sensitive to everything.
-personal sound preference and actual "feel", are 2 different things;
-some people are trying to feel with their ears!!??!!
-I cannot play without a dampener, due to the "broken-glass-sound", I get from FB poly string beds, its like nails to a chalkboard, 2me!
-the "feel" of the impact is not gonna be stopped by such a small piece of rubber that only touches 2 center mains!
-some new manufacturer tech is claiming that the paint their using is going to dampen that vibration more, perhaps??!!, but again not enough to mitigate the high vibrations from ball impact
 
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golden chicken

Professional
I used a shock trap too. If you try it and think it's too much dampening, you can cut the two outer wings off and just use the center two sections. That allows a bit more feedback and it doesn't pop out like most dampeners do.
 

AndI

Rookie
I have a sensitive elbow (or poor technique, or both). I experimented a fair amount with racquets and strings, as I string myself and can do it quicker and cheaper than if I had to use a tennis shop. I learned, through trial and error, that string bed which tends to resonate and create and transfer shock waves to the racquet benefits significantly from a vibration dampener. Basically, my understanding is that dampener reduces the amplitude of the resonance and widens the range of frequencies which form resonance peak... like Q factor of an oscillator in electronics, for those who studied electronics. To put it simple, I experienced (through sensations in my elbow which give me a very clear signal) that some strings tend to generate shocks which create a slightly painful sensation in my elbow, while others do not generate shocks which I could feel. Those which generate shock benefit from a dampener. I can feel how dampener reduces the unpleasant sensations with strings which benefit from it. It does not remove them completely, but makes them less.

I use a full bed of natural gut, it does not require a dampener, I see no beneift from it, and I do not use it. Other string beds vary from "dampener changes very little" to "dampener is hugely beneficial". Stiffer strings are liekly to benefit more. Hence, there is no single "applies to all" answer, but generally, it is a useful thing to have as may turn out to be quite helpful - but it is not a universal solution to all shocks and vibration related issues. It is just "every little bit helps".

Impact on weight balance and swing balance, I believe, is marginally small to negligible. I have yet to meet a person who would notice a difference.
 

Rosstour

Hall of Fame
I’m not sure why Stone would think that putting a soft object in the string bed WOULDN’T have an effect?

“It’s just sound” as if sound weren’t a direct result of vibration lol.

If dampeners do nothing then neither does lead tape. C’mon. Every little change we make has an effect.
 

JW10S

Hall of Fame
A more accurate name for them should be SOUND Dampeners. They only serve to stop the ping noise in my opinion. The noise can throw off people's games so they think they play better with or without them.
As I've said before, I'm amazed by the almost magical powers that people attribute to little pieces of rubber that cost but a few cents to manufacture. As the poster quoted above says they just change the aural feedback you get from the strings, nothing more. They do not cure or prevent tennis elbow, they do not give more or less power, they do not give more control, they do not increase the sweetspot, or any of the other 'magical' effects people attribute to them.
 
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