Do you know anyone who "beat" tennis and walked away ?

FiddlerDog

Professional
I know a guy who played 3.5 tennis, and then 4.0 tennis.
Eventually, he cracked the 4.0 code, dominated, and eventually got bumped to 4.5

But, at 4.5, and age 60, he could not compete against ex-college players. He said it was too huge a leap.
He would get crushed by Mark Sansait caliber players, someone whom most rec players can only dream of hitting like.

So, he reached his logical conclusion in tennis. Conquered 4.0, but could not function at 4.5.
He quit tennis forever, and has done a deep dive into Pickleball and never looked back.
He is now cracking the PB code, and is loving every minute, and with fewer injuries.

Do you know anyone who hit their ceiling and then walked away ?
 
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cortado

Professional
I know a guy who played 4.0 tennis. He cracked 4.0 dubs, dominated, and eventually got bumped to 4.5
But, at 4.5, he could not compete against ex-college players. He said it was too huge a leap.
He would get crushed by Mark Sansait caliber players, someone whom most rec players can only dream of hitting like.
So, he reached his logical conclusion in tennis. Conquered 4.0, but could not function at 4.5.
He quit tennis forever, and has done a deep dive into Pickleball and never looked back.
Do you know anyone who hit their ceiling and then walked away ?
That's sad. I play for enjoyment. To me tennis is like skiing, it's not so much about winning as about getting the pleasure of making that turn/hitting the shot just right.
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
That's sad. I play for enjoyment. To me tennis is like skiing, it's not so much about winning as about getting the pleasure of making that turn/hitting the shot just right.
I'm a feel sportsman too. I enjoy the feel of a well struck forehand, a powder slope, a drive striped down the fairway, etc. The rest of tennis is comradery for me. The only opponent I feel obligated to beat is the one looking in the mirror.

But I know lots of people that are in it to get better and once they plateau, they move on to something else. i don't think the OP's example is one of someone that cracked the code and beat tennis. He just plateaued and got bored.

I'm more likely to move on when I can no longer hit a FH. When there isn't that "great shot" potential and everything is just pushing and junking balls back, I might as well head to PB. Sadly I don't think PB has any great feel moments that keep you coming back. There really isn't a sweetspot on paddle.
 

ChaelAZ

G.O.A.T.
In rec tennis I have never seen anyone actually peak. I have seen them walk away because of family, work, or other commitments, when interest and excitement of playing wans or other sports call, or those types of scenarios. I played racquetball and did southwest tourneys all the time. Played good A's and even did a few opens, but never cracked any codes or such. Just had an injury that gave me a minute to pause and found tennis at that point. Have only plyaed racquetball once since and that was over a decade ago.
 

RVT

Rookie
I know a guy who played 3.5 tennis, and then 4.0 tennis.
Eventually, he cracked the 4.0 code, dominated, and eventually got bumped to 4.5

But, at 4.5, and age 60, he could not compete against ex-college players. He said it was too huge a leap.
He would get crushed by Mark Sansait caliber players, someone whom most rec players can only dream of hitting like.

So, he reached his logical conclusion in tennis. Conquered 4.0, but could not function at 4.5.
He quit tennis forever, and has done a deep dive into Pickleball and never looked back.
He is now cracking the PB code, and is loving every minute, and with fewer injuries.

Do you know anyone who hit their ceiling and then walked away ?
I certainly won't claim to have "beaten" tennis, but I reached a point at which I knew I was topped out and quit. The fact that I couldn't even stand in line at the grocery store without pain didn't help. After diving into satellite events, I got absolutely smoked by some guy who was no.1 in some small Central American country. He make it to like top 300 hundred or something but at that time that he was still starving (not sure if that's changed these day). I realized that the best I could do was maybe top 500, if the planets aligned. Turns about serving high teens is fast against bad D1 players, and nothing against good players. Also turns out that 5'9" guys should be 100% committed to serve and volley (even Dan Evans figured this out..). I also just didn't have the elite reaction time to consistently return a serve over 120 mph. Time to move on..

I switched to bike racing and have had reasonable success there. The big difference: no chronic injuries. The downside: bad injuries when you bounce off the pavement at 45mph in your underwear...

Funny thing is, I've seen some uber talented guys "beat" bike racing, including a guy who made it to the pinnacle of the sport relatively quickly (Euro pro on a Pro Tour team) only just walk away and go back to his day job. I think the combination of living out of hotels without air conditioning in European summers, combined with the very real consequences of the sport were just too much. Good for him.

I started playing tennis again after recovering from a crash and a broken shoulder (non-dominant arm). So, I guess I've come full circle...
 

Mongolmike

Hall of Fame
Yes. I beat tennis. I beat tennis, then I beat my racquets, then I walked away.
Here is video proof.

(My name is Marcos, but I go by "Mike" for short.)

 

socallefty

Legend
The classic trajectory of a 4.5+ Computer rated player is as follows:

- Got to 4.5 or 5.0 as a junior by competing for many years under coaching supervision
- Wasn’t good enough to play college tennis on a scholarship or preferred to go to a better academic school
- Stopped playing tennis for 10-15 years in their twenties and thirties because they were burned out from playing competitive tennis for many years as a kid and also got busy with career, dating and/or starting a family.
- Got back into adult tennis sometime in their thirties usually when they start wanting their kids to learn tennis.
- Got somewhere close to their peak junior level after a few years of hardcore training and then slowly start declining as they are too busy to play often enough to retain their level.
- Either plateau at 4.5 for a couple of decades or slowly go down to 4.0 if they are no longer physically fit.

There are very few rec players who learned tennis as adults and slowly ascended to 4.5+ levels of tennis reaching their peak in middle age - especially if their rating is an official computer rating. I played a lot of tennis as a kid, took a long break as an adult and am now doing my best to stay at 4.5 in my fifties - started playing a lot again only a decade ago.
 
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SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
Walked away in different ways a number of ways. Picked up tennis in the early '70s shortly before turning 21. Some 6+ years later I was playing at a high intermediate level but had hit a mini-plateau. Discovered badminton in my late twenties and pretty much replaced tennis competition with badminton competition after a couple of years. Was teaching tennis a bit but most of my energies went into badm for much of my 30s.

Moved from a novice class (E) up to a low advanced (B-) level during the 1980s but hit a plateau there, So I threw myself back into tennis. My tennis groundstrokes had atrophied during my badminton competition days. Rest of my game was better then it had been before (cuz of the badm).

Started competing at 3.5/4.0 before turning 40. Was able to reach a 4.5/5.0 level by my late 40s. But old injuries kept recurring so I walked away from tournament competition by 50 (just as I was starting 5.0 level play)

Played recreationally during my 50s thru my early 60s. However, injuries got really bad before I turned 65 so I walked away from recreational competition for tennis & badminton in the past 5 years. Started playing more table tennis a couple of years ago but then the pandemic hit and put a stop to that.
 

zill

Hall of Fame
The classic trajectory of a 4.5+ Computer rated player is as follows:

- Got to 4.5 or 5.0 as a junior by competing for many years under coaching supervision
- Wasn’t good enough to play college tennis on a scholarship or preferred to go to a better academic school
- Stopped playing tennis for 10-15 years in their twenties and thirties because they were burned out from playing competitive tennis for many years as a kid and also got busy with career, dating and/or starting a family.
- Got back into adult tennis sometime in their thirties usually when they start wanting their kids to learn tennis.
- Got somewhere close to their peak junior level after a few years of hardcore training and then slowly start declining as they are too busy to play often enough to retain their level.
- Either plateau at 4.5 for a couple of decades or slowly go down to 4.0 if they are no longer physically fit.

There are very few rec players who learned tennis as adults and slowly ascended to 4.5+ levels of tennis reaching their peak in middle age - especially if their rating is an official computer rating.
Nice one. I can relate with one big exception. Playing in my thirties I realised every stroke (except the volley) I had as a junior (high but not college level) was ‘wrong’ or suboptimal and hence have changed them completely. With the hope of getting to ‘college level’ eventually before reaching 40.
 
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zill

Hall of Fame
I know a guy who played 3.5 tennis, and then 4.0 tennis.
Eventually, he cracked the 4.0 code, dominated, and eventually got bumped to 4.5

But, at 4.5, and age 60, he could not compete against ex-college players. He said it was too huge a leap.
He would get crushed by Mark Sansait caliber players, someone whom most rec players can only dream of hitting like.

So, he reached his logical conclusion in tennis. Conquered 4.0, but could not function at 4.5.
He quit tennis forever, and has done a deep dive into Pickleball and never looked back.
He is now cracking the PB code, and is loving every minute, and with fewer injuries.

Do you know anyone who hit their ceiling and then walked away ?
I wouldn’t call ‘beat’ tennis but just ‘worked out’ or ‘solved’ tennis which is what I am currently striving to do.
 

cha cha

Professional
I know plenty of people who have been beaten by tennis. They just could not live with the level of difficulty of the sport. Most are enjoying sports which do not require so much movement talent like cycling or running.
The saddest for me is watching someone go completely away from sports for the reason of time. That just breaks my heart. No time to do sports, always plenty of time to drink.
 

chetrbox

Rookie
I wouldn’t call ‘beat’ tennis but just ‘worked out’ or ‘solved’ tennis which is what I am currently striving to do.
I don't know if he 'solved' tennis if he was getting injured playing tennis. In this day and age with so much good information on biomechanics readily available, any rec player injuring themselves on a tennis court via bad technique (as opposed to a freak accident) or pushing their body beyond its limits is not smart enough to have 'solved' the game.

I know someone who IMO 'solved' tennis the 'right' way. Figured out all the strokes, not just theoretically but also the internal feelings, got good enough to become a coach, then got bored after 5 years and switched to model aviation as his hobby. He was wise enough to maximize his genetic potential without injuring his body, and he probably helped a few others maximize theirs too. He's almost like Tomaz from feeltennis.net , but without the youtube channel.
 

travlerajm

G.O.A.T.
I know a guy who played 3.5 tennis, and then 4.0 tennis.
Eventually, he cracked the 4.0 code, dominated, and eventually got bumped to 4.5

But, at 4.5, and age 60, he could not compete against ex-college players. He said it was too huge a leap.
He would get crushed by Mark Sansait caliber players, someone whom most rec players can only dream of hitting like.

So, he reached his logical conclusion in tennis. Conquered 4.0, but could not function at 4.5.
He quit tennis forever, and has done a deep dive into Pickleball and never looked back.
He is now cracking the PB code, and is loving every minute, and with fewer injuries.

Do you know anyone who hit their ceiling and then walked away ?
Sad story bro.
 
I would not say he beat tennis. Simply just got bored and frustrated and quit because he got smoked at 4.5. Which is sad, he was probably a really good 4.0 player and could still be competing having fun.
 

chetrbox

Rookie
Pros with good mechanics get injured often. Overuse and ageing is the problem.
I singled out 'rec' players for a reason. There's no money on the line for them, so no reason to be pushing their body past its limits(overuse). Aging is just lowering your genetic potential, so if you have the wisdom to be in tune with your body you should be able to stay injury free by playing more conservatively.
 

travlerajm

G.O.A.T.
I started playing competitive tennis in high school, and my level has fluctuated between strong 4.5 and weak 5.0 over the past 30 years, depending mostly on how often I’m playing. But I keep morphing my game style by tweaking/improving my equipment, which seems to be a good way to counter the effects of aging and keep me from declining.
It also keeps tennis fun and interesting for me. And I love the thrill of competing, win or lose, as much as ever.

My serve was several levels stronger 30 years ago than it is now, but my overall competitive level is about the same, because I have other skills that seem to keep improving even in my late 40s.
 

travlerajm

G.O.A.T.
I singled out 'rec' players for a reason. There's no money on the line for them, so no reason to be pushing their body past its limits(overuse). Aging is just lowering your genetic potential, so if you have the wisdom to be in tune with your body you should be able to stay injury free by playing more conservatively.
Yes. I used to rely heavily on offensive serving with a jump serve. But that’s a young guy strategy. As an old guy, jumping explosively into the court on every serve in round 1 is a recipe for a pulled calf muscle in round 2.
 

zill

Hall of Fame
Yes. I used to rely heavily on offensive serving with a jump serve. But that’s a young guy strategy. As an old guy, jumping explosively into the court on every serve in round 1 is a recipe for a pulled calf muscle in round 2.
I actually find returning serve does more ‘damage’ or takes more of a toll to the legs than serving.
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
I don't know if he 'solved' tennis if he was getting injured playing tennis. In this day and age with so much good information on biomechanics readily available, any rec player injuring themselves on a tennis court via bad technique (as opposed to a freak accident) or pushing their body beyond its limits is not smart enough to have 'solved' the game.
Overuse injuries are usually more likely with improper or suboptimal technique but it can also happen with very good, near optimal technique.

Sports will eventually result in some overuse injuries if played more than just moderately. Exercise, in general, is good for us but too much of one type of exercise will cause some body parts to wear out of breakdown. This is the nature of playing a lot of one sport. This happens with pro/elite players as well as rec players.

Our bodies or simply not designed for the demands / excesses that playing sports prolifically (excessively) puts upon us. This is frequently seen with overarm sports

It is also particularly true for modern tennis techniques with modern equipment (such as poly strings).
 
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SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
I singled out 'rec' players for a reason. There's no money on the line for them, so no reason to be pushing their body past its limits(overuse). Aging is just lowering your genetic potential, so if you have the wisdom to be in tune with your body you should be able to stay injury free by playing more conservatively.
No reason? Not true. Amateur players will ofen push because themselves because they derive significant pleasure & fitness from it. For instance, many amateurs are capable of achieving the intoxicating "runner's high" from pushing hard while playing sports like tennis.

As mentioned above, some modern equipment can exacerbate the problem. Modern stroke techniques & footwork patterns are often more demanding on the body than older classic techniques.

The prolific use of a fully open stance is one example of this. This stance puts considerable demands on the dominant hip (right hip for right-handed players). In the past decade or more, elite players will engage in added conditioning to minimize (but not necessarily eliminate) this effect.

Amateur players will often adopt these modern techniques but will not perform enough monster walks or other conditioning countermeasures needed to minimize overuse injuries.
 
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chetrbox

Rookie
No reason? Not true. Amateur players will ofen push because themselves because they derive significant pleasure & fitness from it. For instance, many amateurs are capable of achieving the intoxicating "runner's high" from pushing hard while playing sports like tennis.
If they're hurting/injuring their body while chasing a "high", how are they any different from drug addicts? Doesn't seem wise IMO.
 
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TennisCJC

Legend
The classic trajectory of a 4.5+ Computer rated player is as follows:

- Got to 4.5 or 5.0 as a junior by competing for many years under coaching supervision
- Wasn’t good enough to play college tennis on a scholarship or preferred to go to a better academic school
- Stopped playing tennis for 10-15 years in their twenties and thirties because they were burned out from playing competitive tennis for many years as a kid and also got busy with career, dating and/or starting a family.
- Got back into adult tennis sometime in their thirties usually when they start wanting their kids to learn tennis.
- Got somewhere close to their peak junior level after a few years of hardcore training and then slowly start declining as they are too busy to play often enough to retain their level.
- Either plateau at 4.5 for a couple of decades or slowly go down to 4.0 if they are no longer physically fit.

There are very few rec players who learned tennis as adults and slowly ascended to 4.5+ levels of tennis reaching their peak in middle age - especially if their rating is an official computer rating.
There's a guy in Atlanta like this. He played on D1 team and now is unfit 63 year old who is listed at 4.5 but we beat him in doubles and I am old 4.0 player. He's still solid if you allow him to hit with his feet under him but has very little mobility due to fitness and size. You see a lot of guys like this in the over 60 crowd. Great hands but fitness and mobility give them issues with hitting great shots.

Only guy I know who conquered tennis and walked away is Pete Sampras when he won USO for 14th major and then retired a couple of days later.
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
If they're hurting/injuring their body while chasing a "high", how are they any different from drug addicts? Doesn't seem wise IMO.
The runner's high can very much be an addiction. But, unlike other chemical addictions, it is not compromising the immune system nor depleting the brain or body of any neuro-chemicals or other important amino acids or proteins (like hormones or enzymes).

Chasing the runners high is what is the driving force for many elite athletes and for others who love the sport. After all "Ama" in "Amateur' means "love".

It's not the runner's high itself that causes injuries. It is overuse of muscles and joints -- whether the athlete produces the runner's high or not.
 

PocketAces

New User
I know a guy who played 3.5 tennis, and then 4.0 tennis.
Eventually, he cracked the 4.0 code, dominated, and eventually got bumped to 4.5

But, at 4.5, and age 60, he could not compete against ex-college players. He said it was too huge a leap.
He would get crushed by Mark Sansait caliber players, someone whom most rec players can only dream of hitting like.

So, he reached his logical conclusion in tennis. Conquered 4.0, but could not function at 4.5.
He quit tennis forever, and has done a deep dive into Pickleball and never looked back.
He is now cracking the PB code, and is loving every minute, and with fewer injuries.

Do you know anyone who hit their ceiling and then walked away ?
Logical conclusion? I guess he reached the logical conclusion if winning and ascending the NTRP ladder were the only things that mattered to him. What does it mean to crack the 4.0 code or beat/solve tennis? Tennis isn't a videogame.

The vicissitudes of age happen to the best of us. Your friend could entered tournaments and competed within his age division. But I suppose if he's enjoying pickleball, more power to him (until he reaches another logical conclusion).
 

TennisCJC

Legend
Björn Borg
No, Borg's last major was a close loss to McEnroe in USOpen final and Borg left the court immediately after the match and didn't attend the trophy presentation. He retired shortly thereafter. I always thought he retired too early but I think he couldn't handle losing to McEnroe on grass and hard courts.
 

FiddlerDog

Professional
No, Borg's last major was a close loss to McEnroe in USOpen final and Borg left the court immediately after the match and didn't attend the trophy presentation. He retired shortly thereafter. I always thought he retired too early but I think he couldn't handle losing to McEnroe on grass and hard courts.
Actually, in interviews, Borg addressed this.
He retired because for the first time in his life, he stopped caring if he won or lost.
Tennis was no longer enjoyable for him.
 

TennisCJC

Legend
Actually, in interviews, Borg addressed this.
He retired because for the first time in his life, he stopped caring if he won or lost.
Tennis was no longer enjoyable for him.
Do you think there's a chance that Borg's view was influenced by recent loses to McEnroe who was also a couple of years younger?
 

user92626

G.O.A.T.
Do you know anyone who hit their ceiling and then walked away ?
I don't know about ceiling but I do know a few who hit their flooring and then gone forever!

I guess that's the only thing that makes sense for everyone eventually.



I pretty much realized very early that the levels in recreational tennis are just artificial craps. It's pretty much pointless to get better and better against "the world" because you are always below many many others.



What makes more sense is to be the top or near the top of your own pool. That way you may garner some respect from some people who may matter somewhat in your life, ie friends, acquaintances, as opposed to complete strangers in some random leagues.

More importantly you can use these familiar acquaintances as a basis line for measuring your health, performance as time goes. Meaning, whether you are maintaining, improving or decreasing your health in a sense. That's something helpful from familiar players.
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
What makes more sense is to be the top or near the top of your own pool. That way you may garner some respect from some people who may matter somewhat in your life, ie friends, acquaintances, as opposed to complete strangers in some random leagues.
That leads to stagnation and less and less fun because you know the playing styles of all the players and then cannot deal with new players. I prefer variety and novelty.
 

user92626

G.O.A.T.
That leads to stagnation and less and less fun because you know the playing styles of all the players and then cannot deal with new players. I prefer variety and novelty.
It takes no time for anyone with some brain cells to know someone's style. Knowing opponent's style is practically useless.

It's doing, execution that's important. I can straight out tell you that I would beat you by hitting many good ground strokes, making you run and eventually you fail, because you're slower, hit weaker. What would you do with that knowledge?



Who are new players to you? Tournament players? If they're from 4.5 group, they'll beat you. If they are from 2.5, you'll beat them. Period.

I have played them from leagues. I forgot them quickly after a few hours.
 

Mungo

New User
With deep suspicion I never once played ”The Claw” arcade game often found in pizza joints and bowling alleys…until my then four year old daughter was mesmerized by it at Roundtable Pizza in Poway, the fuzzy giraffe beckoning to her. She asked me if I could win it for her in a voice that no father could resist. With no confidence, but without any free will in the matter, I fed my money into that machine. The gods smiled on me that day, and the claw grabbed that giraffe and delivered it to freedom. I may have peaked as a father that day, at least in my daughter’s eyes. I smile every time I see one of those machines, retiring as the winner on my first die throw. Oh…you probably wanted a tennis story.
 

t_pac

Semi-Pro
The classic trajectory of a 4.5+ Computer rated player is as follows:

- Got to 4.5 or 5.0 as a junior by competing for many years under coaching supervision
- Wasn’t good enough to play college tennis on a scholarship or preferred to go to a better academic school
- Stopped playing tennis for 10-15 years in their twenties and thirties because they were burned out from playing competitive tennis for many years as a kid and also got busy with career, dating and/or starting a family.
- Got back into adult tennis sometime in their thirties usually when they start wanting their kids to learn tennis.
- Got somewhere close to their peak junior level after a few years of hardcore training and then slowly start declining as they are too busy to play often enough to retain their level.
- Either plateau at 4.5 for a couple of decades or slowly go down to 4.0 if they are no longer physically fit.

There are very few rec players who learned tennis as adults and slowly ascended to 4.5+ levels of tennis reaching their peak in middle age - especially if their rating is an official computer rating.
You have just described me to an absolute tee. Bravo lol
 

FiddlerDog

Professional
It takes no time for anyone with some brain cells to know someone's style. Knowing opponent's style is practically useless.
It's doing, execution that's important. I can straight out tell you that I would beat you by hitting many good ground strokes, making you run and eventually you fail, because you're slower, hit weaker. What would you do with that knowledge?
Well said. Information and tips are virtually useless. Execution is everything, and you can't learn that from forums or videos.
It's as silly as telling someone, "To win your match, just serve 140mph to his BH all match. Problem solved"
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
Well said. Information and tips are virtually useless. Execution is everything, and you can't learn that from forums or videos.
It's as silly as telling someone, "To win your match, just serve 140mph to his BH all match. Problem solved"
I'd win most of my matches if I could reliably serve 90 mph to my opponents BH. :p

Execution requires a base of information. So information is not useless. If you don't know what you are supposed to do, how are you going to even come close to executing.

Problem solving in tennis goes like this:
a) Player struggles handling a certain opponents shot or tactic.
b) Player gets advice from trusted sources as to how to deal with said shot or tactic
c) Player practices the solution to the problem
d) Player executes said solution in match play

Identify the issue, find the solution, practice, execute.
 

user92626

G.O.A.T.
I'd win most of my matches if I could reliably serve 90 mph to my opponents BH. :p

Execution requires a base of information. So information is not useless. If you don't know what you are supposed to do, how are you going to even come close to executing.
No one is saying information itself is useless. But in the context of dealing with a challenge, finding the info to help you doesn't rate very high because it's essentially non issue. Watch MEP, we all know how MEP plays and beats his opponent. It's not any secrets.

Most experienced people can give you a boatload of useful info -- far beyond your need -- but that's still very far from making you good though. :giggle:
 

mcs1970

Hall of Fame
No one is saying information itself is useless. But in the context of dealing with a challenge, finding the info to help you doesn't rate very high because it's essentially non issue. Watch MEP, we all know how MEP plays and beats his opponent. It's not any secrets.

Most experienced people can give you a boatload of useful info -- far beyond your need -- but that's still very far from making you good though. :giggle:
Not following your logic. Execution also depends upon knowledge. How do you separate one from the other? You learn something via visual learning or tips ( be it via a forum or some other medium), you practice it, and then try to implement it. Then you measure via a feedback loop in practices and matches.

Is that going to bump you from a 3.0 to a 4.0 in a day? No one is saying that. However it might help you beat your fellow 3.0 who you have been struggling to beat. One step at a time.
 

user92626

G.O.A.T.
Not following your logic. Execution also depends upon knowledge. How do you separate one from the other? You learn something via visual learning or tips ( be it via a forum or some other medium), you practice it, and then try to implement it. Then you measure via a feedback loop in practices and matches.

Is that going to bump you from a 3.0 to a 4.0 in a day? No one is saying that. However it might help you beat your fellow 3.0 who you have been struggling to beat. One step at a time.
Let's use an example of something else to show my point, and it's very much the same.

I bet everyone knows how to get fit, healthy and strong. Eat the correct the amount of meat, veggies for your body and exercise regularly. That's really a no brainer. Nobody cant say they don't know that knowledge.

But majority is overweight and not at the point they wanna be. Is this an issue of knowledge or of implementation?
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
Let's use an example of something else to show my point, and it's very much the same.

I bet everyone knows how to get fit, healthy and strong. Eat the correct the amount of meat, veggies for your body and exercise regularly. That's really a no brainer. Nobody cant say they don't know that knowledge.

But majority is overweight and not at the point they wanna be. Is this an issue of knowledge or of implementation?
Neither. Genetics and behavioural modification.
 
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