DO YOU LIKE KETCHUP?

DO YOU LIKE KETCHUP?


  • Total voters
    32
I see this at Safeway. Tastes almost as good as Heinz. But no HFCS.



Organic Ketchup

Combining ripe organic tomatoes and a blend of spices, Annie’s ketchup is sure to please ketchup lovers everywhere with hints of clove spice and a full-bodied flavor. Rich and robust and miles ahead of conventional ketchup in taste and texture!

INGREDIENTS: *Tomato Paste*, Water, Cane Sugar*, Distilled White Vinegar*, Sea Salt, Dried Onion*, Allspice*, Clove* *Organic
They make Heinz without the HFCS. I believe you just have to get the Simply Heinz variety.
 
No and you can't make me.
I don't like regular mayonnaise. I'll mix ketchup with miracle whip light though. That's not a bad combo.
I know it sounds kinda gross but McDonalds had this burger called BigNtasty about a decade ago. Had Mayo and Ketchup with leaf lettuce and tomato with a quarter pound beef patty. They don't have those anymore. I was so addicted to them in college.

Looks like Thousand Island dressing, fat sauce
Tastes nothing like Thousand Island, lol
 

Ronaldo

Talk Tennis Guru
I know it sounds kinda gross but McDonalds had this burger called BigNtasty about a decade ago. Had Mayo and Ketchup with leaf lettuce and tomato with a quarter pound beef patty. They don't have those anymore. I was so addicted to them in college.


Tastes nothing like Thousand Island, lol
Rallys had a commercial for the Big Buford that dripped ketchup & mayo all over a guy's basketball shoes. Also remember the Big n Tasty from McD about 25 yrs ago. In Mich they had the sandwich separated with a cool side with lettuce, sliced tomato, and condiments. Other side being the burger.
Avoided the mess.
 
Make up the deficit with guavas and watermelon but don't cook them.
Thanks for the suggestion. Love both of these things.

But guavas are seasonal around here and they tend to strip the enamel off my sensitive teeth. Have been looking for a good guava juice that I can drink with a straw. Even tho the juice might only have 1/3 the Lycopene of the fruit.

Sadly, the first two ingredients in Kerns guava juice are water and HFCS. My quest for a decent guava juice continues.

Living by myself these days so buying watermelons tends to be very wasteful. Do go for it tho whenever I visit a full salad bar.

Anyway, not going to stop putting the red gourmet sauce on my dogs. Even on fully loaded dogs. Obviously, don't put as much ketchup on a fully loaded dog as I would for a more Spartan hot dog. Just love the taste and the Lycopene of the condiment.
 
Oh you live in heaven, I see. You are a good soul, I see. Three visits to the TJ a week is impressive. Very devout. You are my hero now.

Try the chocolate coated coffee beans. Haven't had them for several years now.
Made it over to TJs again and picked them up (dark choc espresso beans). Good call on these. I highly recommend this product as well (but they may not fare well if you have them shipped to you).

Those are the bomb! I haven't had them in a while, but oh so good. Joe-Joe's are also really good. You'll never go back to Oreos (gross) once you try them.
Have you tried the seasonal versions? Now that TJ is in pumpkin overload mode, they currently have Pumpkin Joe-Joe's and Halloween Joe-Joe's.
 

Ketchup. Anyone from Sweden will understand this topic without the explanation but let me pretext for anyone else. Swedes love ketchup. Seriously. I’m not talking extra amount on fries and hamburgers, I’m talking about slathered onto pasta (and other foods, such as mashed potatoes and meatballs but this one seems the most controversial). Now, a lot of people will think this is weird, some will think it makes sense. After all, it is tomatoes. And fries and burgers get ketchup so why not a different version of potatoes and meat? A good point, but not one that many will easily accept. Swedes are known for this eating habit and are proud of the oddity, yes, they know its not the most common way to eat pasta.
https://somethingswedish.wordpress.com/2012/01/16/when-in-rome/




Do Swedes like ketchup on their surströmming?
 

Ketchup. Anyone from Sweden will understand this topic without the explanation but let me pretext for anyone else. Swedes love ketchup. Seriously. I’m not talking extra amount on fries and hamburgers, I’m talking about slathered onto pasta (and other foods, such as mashed potatoes and meatballs but this one seems the most controversial). Now, a lot of people will think this is weird, some will think it makes sense. After all, it is tomatoes. And fries and burgers get ketchup so why not a different version of potatoes and meat? A good point, but not one that many will easily accept. Swedes are known for this eating habit and are proud of the oddity, yes, they know its not the most common way to eat pasta.
https://somethingswedish.wordpress.com/2012/01/16/when-in-rome/




Do Swedes like ketchup on their surströmming?
My ancestors were from Sweden, maybe thats why we put ketchup on our mac and cheese
 
Made it over to TJs again and picked them up (dark choc espresso beans). Good call on these. I highly recommend this product as well (but they may not fare well if you have them shipped to you).



Have you tried the seasonal versions? Now that TJ is in pumpkin overload mode, they currently have Pumpkin Joe-Joe's and Halloween Joe-Joe's.
And don't forget Pumpkin O's!
 
Ketchup comes from the Hokkien Chinese word, kê-tsiap, the name of a sauce derived from fermented fish. It is believed that traders brought fish sauce from Vietnam to southeastern China.

The British likely encountered ketchup in Southeast Asia, returned home, and tried to replicate the fermented dark sauce. This probably happened in the late 17th and early 18th centuries as evidenced by a recipe published in 1732 for “Ketchup in Paste,” by Richard Bradley, which referenced “Bencoulin in the East-Indies” as its origin. (See “How a Food Becomes Famous.”)

But this was certainly not the ketchup we would recognize today. Most British recipes called for ingredients like mushrooms, walnuts, oysters, or anchovies in an effort to reproduce the savory tastes first encountered in Asia. Mushroom ketchup was even a purported favorite of Jane Austen. These early ketchups were mostly thin and dark, and were often added to soups, sauces, meat and fish. At this point, ketchup lacked one important ingredient.

Enter the tomato. The first known published tomato ketchup recipe appeared in 1812, written by scientist and horticulturalist, James Mease, who referred to tomatoes as “love apples.” His recipe contained tomato pulp, spices, and brandy but lacked vinegar and sugar.
https://www.nationalgeographic.com/...he-plate/2014/04/21/how-was-ketchup-invented/

 
Ketchup comes from the Hokkien Chinese word, kê-tsiap, the name of a sauce derived from fermented fish. It is believed that traders brought fish sauce from Vietnam to southeastern China.

The British likely encountered ketchup in Southeast Asia, returned home, and tried to replicate the fermented dark sauce. This probably happened in the late 17th and early 18th centuries as evidenced by a recipe published in 1732 for “Ketchup in Paste,” by Richard Bradley, which referenced “Bencoulin in the East-Indies” as its origin. (See “How a Food Becomes Famous.”)

But this was certainly not the ketchup we would recognize today. Most British recipes called for ingredients like mushrooms, walnuts, oysters, or anchovies in an effort to reproduce the savory tastes first encountered in Asia. Mushroom ketchup was even a purported favorite of Jane Austen. These early ketchups were mostly thin and dark, and were often added to soups, sauces, meat and fish. At this point, ketchup lacked one important ingredient.

Enter the tomato. The first known published tomato ketchup recipe appeared in 1812, written by scientist and horticulturalist, James Mease, who referred to tomatoes as “love apples.” His recipe contained tomato pulp, spices, and brandy but lacked vinegar and sugar.
https://www.nationalgeographic.com/...he-plate/2014/04/21/how-was-ketchup-invented/

Domo arigato for the in-depth history. I had provided the "Readers Digest" version on the previous page (post #56).
 
The history of the word ketchup is pretty much irrelevant. Mushroom sauce has very little in common with tomato ketchup, except for the fact that both have umami. Which is a fake term for savory but whatever, it's a popular buzzword.

Re mustard - it's a great condiment! Ketchup, mayo and mustard are the 3 main condiments.
 
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