Do you play tennis or are you a non-playing fan?

As a tennis fan I:


  • Total voters
    178

Virginia

Hall of Fame
#51
I play three times a week, even though I'm in my late 70s. I once reached the final of a tournament in Surrey (UK), but I play a lot better than I did then. I joined this forum because I collect classic racquets and wanted to know more about them. I play exclusively with classic racquets, as they are far, far better than the rubbish available these days.
 

Tennis_Hands

Talk Tennis Guru
#55
Self-assessment. ~30 years ago I played (un-officially) against Solopov and Miska Ovcarov (father of Dimitri Ovcarov who plays for Germany). It was SSSR then.
At least get the names right.

In Russian none of these names (father and son) are written or pronounced like you here do: D(i)mitrii is with a double I in the end, and is clearly pronounced and written in that way, Misca is not Misca, but Misha, and Ovtcharov has a distinctive "tch".

:cool:
 

ABCD

Hall of Fame
#57
At least get the names right.

In Russian none of these names (father and son) are written or pronounced like you here do: D(i)mitrii is with a double I in the end, and is clearly pronounced and written in that way, Misca is not Misca, but Misha, and Ovtcharov has a distinctive "tch".

:cool:
I don't know Russian. He called himself Miska. I thought that they write Cyrillic.
 

ABCD

Hall of Fame
#59
So you don't know. Thought so.
I know. Nobody knows it better than me. I think I'm a better player now than when I was at 24 because I've did not practise for another 30 years and I've got 30 years more experience. I might not have the confidence I had at 24 when I was winning 2 matches in a row, but I feel like I have a better serve, my backhand is better, my forehand is still as good as it's ever been. I think I've had to adapt to several new generations of players again.
 

alexio88

Professional
#61
He certainly doesn't call himself "Misc/ka", and, yes, they do (which is irrelevant, as you should be able to express the way they pronounce their names, if you heard them).

:cool:
full name mikhail .,small version mischa, and also can be used mischka(usually between family members or friends or close people), dimitrii there no that name, there's dmitriy (dima - small version)
 

ABCD

Hall of Fame
#62
He certainly doesn't call himself "Misc/ka", and, yes, they do (which is irrelevant, as you should be able to express the way they pronounce their names, if you heard them).

:cool:
You are wrong. This is how to write Ми́шка (Míška). As I don't have š on my keyboard it is Miska. Are you Russian? I know even language than I don't know better than you.
 
#69
I know. Nobody knows it better than me.
Nobody knows it, period. All you have is a hunch.

I think I'm a better player now than when I was at 24 because I've did not practise for another 30 years and I've got 30 years more experience. I might not have the confidence I had at 24 when I was winning 2 matches in a row, but I feel like I have a better serve, my backhand is better, my forehand is still as good as it's ever been. I think I've had to adapt to several new generations of players again.
Practiced or did not practice?
 

Tennis_Hands

Talk Tennis Guru
#70
You are wrong. This is how to write Ми́шка (Míška). As I don't have š on my keyboard it is Miska. Are you Russian? I know even language than I don't know better than you.
You should inform yourself better. Bolded is not Russian, and there are combinations of letters that exactly correspond to the sound, none of which is what you have written.

:cool:
 
#72
full name mikhail .,small version mischa, and also can be used mischka(usually between family members or friends or close people), dimitrii there no that name, there's dmitriy (dima - small version)
The word is 'diminutive'. We're speaking English here, after all.

Dimitri is the older full name before the first vowel eroded. In Bulgarian, it's the last vowel that vanished, giving Димитър (hence Dimitrov).
 
#74
I play tennis at least 4 hours a week and I'm doing competitions (in France). If I had to chose between watching and playing, it would be a very difficult choice but I think I would choose playing because it's one of the thing that I like doing the most in life.
 

alexio88

Professional
#76
The word is 'diminutive'. We're speaking English here, after all.

Dimitri is the older full name before the first vowel eroded. In Bulgarian, it's the last vowel that vanished, giving Димитър (hence Dimitrov).
you are right i forgot this word diminutive exactly.. dimitrii is bulgarian name yes
 
#84
I played competitively in high school but wasn't good enough to make the college team for the school I went to, probably a 5.0 or 5.5.

But the real big deal is that I publish papers in tennis performance and instruction @ABCD
 

alexio88

Professional
#87
D(i)mitrii is a pretty normal Russian name.

:cool:
yes dmitriy ..but without i ..noboby give a name to a child dimitrii.. only dmitriy(dima, mitiya) don't understand why you arguing with if i'm only russian here guys) dimitrii is ancient form of a name (also demetriy)
 
Last edited:
#88
I want to post a clip of mine but I'm afraid it would replace Suresh's as new TT meme.

So all I can tell is I've watched tennis for > 30 years, played for > 10 years, Adidas fan but eyeing Asics, love Head but currently using a Prince.

Cheers.
Can you possibly play in the same cloth in you avatar and post a video ?
 

ABCD

Hall of Fame
#90
yes dmitriy ..but without i ..noboby give a name to a child dimitrii.. only dmitriy(dima, mitiya) don't understand why you arguing with if i'm only russian here guys)
You are not alone here. AnOctorok.. is Russian from Moscow and Tennis_Hands is most likely Russian.
 

Tennis_Hands

Talk Tennis Guru
#91
The Russian name would be 'Dmitrij', if we transcribe letter for sound; two syllables. 'Dimitrij', three syllables, is the older full name that is not given now.
That is interesting: what is the reasoning behind using "ij" instead of "ii"?

I think that the older Dimitrii or Dimitrij as you say, has something to do with the Orthodox Church.

Can it be that the state is trying to move away from its influence?

:cool:
 

Tennis_Hands

Talk Tennis Guru
#92
yes dmitriy ..but without i ..noboby give a name to a child dimitrii.. only dmitriy(dima, mitiya) don't understand why you arguing with if i'm only russian here guys) dimitrii is ancient version of a name (also demetriy)
I am not arguing which is old and which new, or how often they are used. I said that it is a normal Russian name, and it is.

:cool:
 
#95
That is interesting: what is the reasoning behind using "ij" instead of "ii"?
Because it's two different sounds? 'i' represents the vowel , j represents the semivowel [j], as in year. Since "y" in English can denote both and [j] (and [aj] as well, as in
my'), I sought to be precise.

I think that the older Dimitrii or Dimitrij as you say, has something to do with the Orthodox Church.

Can it be that the state is trying to move away from its influence?

:cool:
Language evolution. Name got shortened for quickness because it's used frequently. Happened centuries ago. The full name Dimitrij comes from Greek Demetrius, by the way. Demetra was the goddess of fertility, I think.
 

Tennis_Hands

Talk Tennis Guru
#97
Because it's two different sounds? 'i' represents the vowel , j represents the semivowel [j], as in year. Since "y" in English can denote both and [j] (and [aj] as well, as in
my'), I sought to be precise.



Language evolution. Name got shortened for quickness because it's used frequently. Happened centuries ago. The full name Dimitrij comes from Greek Demetrius, by the way. Demetra was the goddess of fertility, I think.
Thank you.

:cool:
 
#99
I play 6h a week. I drive generation "spin" mad with my clean flat hitting and taking-the-ball-early game :cool:
Lol.
There is a certain flair to hitting flat. Even though I only have that experience from TT but I know how it feels to hit a Delpo like FH. But I think after a certain point one needs the spins to put some balls in play and also to hit harder with more margin.
 
I have been playing tennis for about 15 years (late starter, I was about 30yo when I picked up a racket), first 10 years non competitive (mainly just hitting balls with friends in a park's public court) then I joined a tennis club and got addicted by the adrenaline you get from playing matches and, of course, my tennis abilities improved greatly. I am currently the holder of all 3 vets trophies (single, men's double and mixed) having achieved the treble last year, a feat only obtained once before in the whole history of my club...
 
Top