Doctor with Multiple Sclerosis

Soul

Semi-Pro
Thanks for posting and sharing. I passed the article onto an aunt as she was recently diagnosed with MS. She is in the early stage and we have our fingers crossed that her conditions does not worsen.

I passed along in the past to my aunt articles and interviews of Dr. Terry Wahl's. She had advanced MS, to the point where she was not able to walk, and with changes diet and some other interventions was able to regain her life back. One of the speeches Dr. Wahl's gave was inspiring to see. Also saw recently another dietary idea that might have helped MS patients in the past. It was put together by a Roy Swank, which can be read about here ~

http://rawfoodsos.com/2015/10/06/in-defense-of-low-fat-a-call-for-some-evolution-of-thought-part-1/#swank
 

Dartagnan64

Legend
I am a physician and I can say that I find patients that demand a treatment more frustrating than patients that don't want to follow your recommendations. Doctors only have 2 jobs: prolong life and ease suffering. And i would say most patient visits are for the latter. I get frustrated only when patients refuse treatments that will serve both goals. I give patients autonomy when treatments only ease suffering or prolong life at the expense of increased suffering. What I hate is patients demanding therapies that won't prolong their lives or ease suffering.
 

ollinger

G.O.A.T.
^^ Therapies that patients "demand" can have an especially strong placebo effect, as the patient has a high expectation of benefit, so I tend not to resent prescribing them. Naturally, one shouldn't succumb to this pressure if there's a potential significant negative effect of the therapy.
 
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Dartagnan64

Legend
^^ Therapies that patients "demand" can have an especially strong placebo effect, as the patient has a high expectation of benefit, so I tend not to resent prescribing them. Naturally, one shouldn't succumb to this pressure if there's a potential significant negative effect of the therapy.
Truly, the placebo effect is impressive at times but it is questionable ethically to prescribe treatment that you believe only works via placebo. I could get into a great deal of hot water with my college registrar by engaging in placebo treatments.
 

ollinger

G.O.A.T.
64
No, I wasn't referring to placebos but rather the placebo effect of legitimate therapies. For example, I may sometimes think drug A would be optimal for patient, but drug B, which is less optimal, did wonders for somebody the patient knows so he's really eager to try that one instead. I think true placebos are pretty universally considered unethical in clinical practice.
 
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Dartagnan64

Legend
64
No, I wasn't referring to placebos but rather the placebo effect of legitimate therapies. For example, I may sometimes think drug A would be optimal for patient, but drug B, which is less optimal, did wonders for somebody the patient knows so he's really eager to try that one instead. I think true placebos are pretty universally considered unethical in clinical practice.
I agree. I've definitely done that for legitimate treatments when there is a choice.
 
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