Does a string pattern matter for REC players?

Searah

Semi-Pro
hello :) so i've always considered myself a spin player. semi western on both forehand/backhand.

but i was playing with some people today and they were saying how a proper spin pattern/racket can boost your topspin by at least 20%.

and how say "some people shouldn't be using a certain frame for their playstyle" ect.

so now that got into my head and begin to doubt my own racket.

would i actually get more spin from a difference pattern?

my volkl v sense 1 is 16x17.
as far as i can from googling my own racket. it's considered a power beginner racket. which actually makes me a bit depressed.
also 16x17 is pretty rare in general? /shrug.

would i benefit more from a difference pattern if i wanted even more spin?

thankyou :)
 

zaph

Professional
There is allot of non-sense talked about rackets, too often the consensus is if you're not using a 100 square inch frame with poly strings and at least 300g weight, you're not a proper player.

It is whatever suits you, as far as I can tell you are using an oversized frame and if that works for you, fine. Just use it and ignore what other people say. What matters is it is comfortable and you can play with it.

I find that a lighter frame lets me generate more power, faster arm, but at the expense of comfort and control. However that is just my experience.

If you want to find out if another racket will improve you game, then play test a few.
 

Slicerman

Semi-Pro
Of course the string pattern matters, but so does the head size. Typically a larger head size will result in an even more open string pattern because the gap between the string is more spread out. Volkl V-Sense 1 is indicated to have a 115 square inch head size, which is considered 'oversized'. With a 16 x 17 string pattern it would be considered a very open string pattern. The more open the string pattern, the more powerful and responsive the stringbed will be. Open string patterns also increase spin potential but only if your stroke style is conducive to creating spin. Generally lightweight, oversized racquets are designed for beginners or players who lack the athletic ability to swing fast or take full swings. There's a lot of things to take into consideration, like how you currently play, your technique, your physicality and how you want to improve.
 

esgee48

G.O.A.T.
Use whatever you like. Your current frame can impart spin to the ball easily. If you are curious, demo a 'spin frame' like the Burn LS or Burn ULS and see if it makes a difference. To put it bluntly, "it is the player." I know a lot of players that use 18x20's and they can outspin me. Similarly, I can outspin players using 16x18 frames.
 

GeoffHYL

Professional
Do you need more spin? Lots of spin typically helps people who hit the ball hard and need the spin to bring the ball back down into the court before it goes long. I don't hit the ball really hard, so I use moderate spin most of the time. When I do use lots of spin it is either a loopy shot or drops shorter than I would like.

As far as string pattern is concerned, I find the string pattern effects launch angle more than spin generation. Open string patterns seem to have a higher launch angle than closed string patterns.
 

fuzz nation

G.O.A.T.
hello :) so i've always considered myself a spin player. semi western on both forehand/backhand.

but i was playing with some people today and they were saying how a proper spin pattern/racket can boost your topspin by at least 20%.

and how say "some people shouldn't be using a certain frame for their playstyle" ect.

so now that got into my head and begin to doubt my own racket.

would i actually get more spin from a difference pattern?

my volkl v sense 1 is 16x17.
as far as i can from googling my own racket. it's considered a power beginner racket. which actually makes me a bit depressed.
also 16x17 is pretty rare in general? /shrug.

would i benefit more from a difference pattern if i wanted even more spin?

thankyou :)
Lots of industry recommendations and racquet features offer us nothing more than general guidelines. Unfortunately in some cases, certain technologies, string patterns, etc. are nothing more than gimmicks that companies come up with in their attempts to reinvent the wheel and sell more racquets.

What's the final decider? You. If the racquet is cozy when you play with it and seems to produce some decent shots when you make the right move, then all the mumbo-jumbo can be set aside.

The racquets with their spin patterns have worked for some folks and others haven't been especially impressed. I'm not too big on them myself, mostly because with fewer strings sharing the load each time we whack the ball, those strings can be chewed up much more quickly than a more conventional string pattern. Harder hitters using frames with spin patterns can often be forced into using poly, since syn. gut or multi can break down very quickly in this sort of layout.

If you like your frame, then use it. If you need to learn more about what other equipment might have to offer, try an occasional demo. If you do this for yourself, I recommend keeping notes on the racquets you try, including string types installed. When I did this starting many years ago, I eventually figured out what I prefer in my racquet along the lines of static weight, balance, and flex.

I'd be willing to bet you a nickel that you'll eventually find that the specific string pattern in your racquet isn't a very big deal. I've owned a couple different frames through the years that were really difficult to generate spin with out there, despite having mildly open 16x18 or 16x19 patterns. But I've also owned or just tried out a few with these patterns that were absolute spin factories for me - including an old 92" mid having a very dense 18x20 setup.

Your comfort zone might even evolve over time. If you start trading harder shots with players more often and need more stability in your racquet, that might come with simply adding a little lead tape or shopping out a mildly heavier alternative. No racquet is built to produce an exact degree of spin potential, but when you find one that's good for you and how you swing at the ball, it will probably give you enough of what you need.

Keep your expectations in check and try not to be too distracted by equipment options. It's nice to find a frame that's a decent fit, but no racquet does anything until we pick it up and swing it. Some racquets will have different personalities that may include a little easier access to spin - that's why I keep two different models in my bag - but we still need to swing them correctly to produce good shots.
 

Traffic

Hall of Fame
hello :) so i've always considered myself a spin player. semi western on both forehand/backhand.

but i was playing with some people today and they were saying how a proper spin pattern/racket can boost your topspin by at least 20%.

and how say "some people shouldn't be using a certain frame for their playstyle" ect.

so now that got into my head and begin to doubt my own racket.

would i actually get more spin from a difference pattern?

my volkl v sense 1 is 16x17.
as far as i can from googling my own racket. it's considered a power beginner racket. which actually makes me a bit depressed.
also 16x17 is pretty rare in general? /shrug.

would i benefit more from a difference pattern if i wanted even more spin?

thankyou :)
If you are currently playing with a 115 frame with 16x17 pattern, that's probably about as spin friendly (and powerful) a racquet you can find.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but are you not a beginner player?

I used to think that I'm a spin player too. I used a lot of "brush" technique to impart the spin rather than hitting through the ball and letting the finish and the racquet head speed impart the spin. I played with a Pro Staff 97LS (97", 18x16) which is a spin friendly design.

But I actually went to a more "standard" racquet, Volkl V1Pro (100", 16x19) to learn how to hit through the ball and then put spin back by finishing my strokes.

If you think you are ready to transition from a "beginner" racquet to a more neutral racquet, you may want to look around for models that are:
98-105sq "
11oz
16x19
 

Fintft

Legend
I went from a controlled/closed pattern 18X20, to an open one 16X18, in order to get more spin and prevent my balls from sailing long with full bed natural gut. Never looked back.
 

Keendog

Professional
hello :) so i've always considered myself a spin player. semi western on both forehand/backhand.

but i was playing with some people today and they were saying how a proper spin pattern/racket can boost your topspin by at least 20%.

and how say "some people shouldn't be using a certain frame for their playstyle" ect.

so now that got into my head and begin to doubt my own racket.

would i actually get more spin from a difference pattern?

my volkl v sense 1 is 16x17.
as far as i can from googling my own racket. it's considered a power beginner racket. which actually makes me a bit depressed.
also 16x17 is pretty rare in general? /shrug.

would i benefit more from a difference pattern if i wanted even more spin?

thankyou :)
I don't like the beginner/advanced terminology. I prefer power/intermediate/control terms. VSense 1 is a powerful frame for people with short strokes. That can be beginner adults, older people, some petite ladies in general. But a racquet isn't a status symbol, it should whatever is comfortable for you. The string pattern on that racquet while open doesn't make it a huge spinny racquet, it's so powerful the ball just seems to ping off it. Volkl's spinniest racquet is the VSense-9. But don't change because of something you have read about the racquet, only change if it isn't comfortable for you
 

Raul_SJ

G.O.A.T.
I've owned a couple different frames through the years that were really difficult to generate spin with out there, despite having mildly open 16x18 or 16x19 patterns. But I've also owned or just tried out a few with these patterns that were absolute spin factories for me - including an old 92" mid having a very dense 18x20 setup.
.
I was using a Prince Tour 95 18x20 and did not notice less spin than an open 16X19 pattern.

Apparently open patterns are supposed to grab the ball and produce more topspin? but I am not entirely convinced.
 

Dolgopolov85

G.O.A.T.
You know what, my uncle is in his mid 50s and plays 5.0. With a Head Ti5 racquet. So by all means choose a racquet that suits you, that you feel comfortable with. But I am highly comfortable that something like string pattern alone can increase your spin by 20%. That's a LOT.
 

Keendog

Professional
I was using a Prince Tour 95 18x20 and did not notice less spin than an open 16X19 pattern.

Apparently open patterns are supposed to grab the ball and produce more topspin? but I am not entirely convinced.
Wilson's spin effect frames definetly do. The thing is it's still your swing that creates spin so you need to have confidence to swing out with it so low powered frames tend to help with that. But two identical frames side by side, the more open one will definitely be able to generate more spin at the cost of some control
 

nvr2old

Hall of Fame
IMO string pattern mostly affects launch angle and therefore correlates with better margin over the net and not necessarily more spin.I have had everything from 16 x 16 to 18 x 20 from 93 to 117 head size set up’s. As has already been mentioned so many things go into spin production including racket head size string spacing and how many mains are in the throat etc. Most important in my opinion is racket drop and racket head speed in generating spin with much less effect based on string pattern. What I generally found is that with more open string pattern it gave me more net margin but lacked some in ball penetration and overall speed through the court. Just my two cents. Good luck.
 

samarai

Semi-Pro
once u find a racket u are comfortable with, stick with it. Don't go racket chasing like a lot of the guys on the rec courts who think that the newest rackets will
give them an added advantage. They usually don't. Honestly, if u have good stroke mechanics and have good movement, u can probably play with any racket.
 

nvr2old

Hall of Fame
once u find a racket u are comfortable with, stick with it. Don't go racket chasing like a lot of the guys on the rec courts who think that the newest rackets will
give them an added advantage. They usually don't. Honestly, if u have good stroke mechanics and have good movement, u can probably play with any racket.
Great advice!!
 

fuzz nation

G.O.A.T.
I was using a Prince Tour 95 18x20 and did not notice less spin than an open 16X19 pattern.

Apparently open patterns are supposed to grab the ball and produce more topspin? but I am not entirely convinced.
As far as I know, there are two theories at work with more open patterns. One is that the larger spaces between the strings allow more of the felt on the ball to smush into them and let the strings grab hold. The other is that with fewer strings woven across each other, the easier it is for the strings to displace at contact. When they can more readily do that, the thinking is that they can more quickly sort of "link up" with the surface of the ball to get it spinning instead of the strings just sliding across the surface.

A lot of this went out the window for me when I played with my old Prince NXG mids - 92" hoop, very flexible (may have rated in the high 50's), and that 18x20 string pattern that's about as dense as a wood racquet. But this is a frame with an old-school design that's up near 13 oz., so along with that softness, it forces me to use proper technique and complete swings if I want to produce good shots. What I get here is a recipe for lots of spin - I string those racquets with 17 ga. syn. gut at perhaps 55-56 lbs.

Another head scratcher for me is the difference between the two models I keep in my bag all the time. These are the Volkl C10 and the Volkl O10 325g. My O10's are leaded to give me a weight and balance that's almost exactly the same as my C10's - this makes switching between the two models pretty easy for me. So weights and balances are very close, both have 98" heads, and also have 16x19 string patterns. I think the O10's listed only one point higher on the flex rating scale than the C10, so that isn't too far off either. Similar performance? That would be no.

The C10 is my easy choice for heavy baseline slugging and serving big, but I have to make a very deliberate move to really shape my shots with decent spin. The O10's are mildly more "punchy" feeling (love these frames for doubles), slightly less eager to annihilate the ball, but churn out all the spin I've ever wanted in my gear. One or two of my pals who have sampled both of my racquets have found the exact same personality contrast.

I know that the C10's have historically exhibited a little more "hoop flex" than other frames, while the O10's are mildly more firm in the hoop and flex a bit at the throat. Subtle differences in their builds, but the performance contrast is substantial. So in my roundabout way of agreeing with you, none of the yaddah-yaddah really matters once we take this or that racquet out to the courts to see what sort of fit it can give us.
 
D

Deleted member 23235

Guest
string pattern doesn't matter if you don't have good technique (top or under) for generating spin...
that said, open string patterns are fun (closest you can get to a legal "spaghetti string job" but not necessary if you have good technique... and will cost you more money in stringing later.

i personally found i don't need the open string, and is a little harder to control depth... more spin, yes, but i'd rather give up spin for a bit more depth control.
 

snvplayer

Hall of Fame
hello :) so i've always considered myself a spin player. semi western on both forehand/backhand.

but i was playing with some people today and they were saying how a proper spin pattern/racket can boost your topspin by at least 20%.

and how say "some people shouldn't be using a certain frame for their playstyle" ect.

so now that got into my head and begin to doubt my own racket.

would i actually get more spin from a difference pattern?

my volkl v sense 1 is 16x17.
as far as i can from googling my own racket. it's considered a power beginner racket. which actually makes me a bit depressed.
also 16x17 is pretty rare in general? /shrug.

would i benefit more from a difference pattern if i wanted even more spin?

thankyou :)
Yes, different string pattern will impart different amount of spin and pace on the ball. More open string pattern results in higher spin and pace, and more dense string pattern means more "feel / control". I believe 18x20 is the most dense string pattern whereas 16x19 are commonly seen and considered more open. There are inbetweens like 16x20, 16x18. So, 16x17 is already consisdered open by the standard.

Choosing a tennis racket is like learning how to wear make-up. You try different colors, shades, and style, and you eventually find out what looks good on you.
With a tennis racket, you want to feel comfortable and play effective tennis.

Volkl makes very good tennis rackets, and 16x17 would be a good choice of string pattern if you wanted maximize spin potential.
If you are just learning tennis, I'd imagine your racket would be a good starting point. You can always try different rackets and see how they feel.
 

Chingoo1255

Rookie
For me it’s the difference in going over the net or into the net. I use mainly Wilson spin rackets PS95S usually. PS97s if I’m feeling really energetic and can swing it. If I play with the PS95 16x19 I have to always be conscious of my swing path or it goes into the net more often. With the spin racket I can get away without being so swing path conscious. However my hitting partner says my heavier shots come from an 18x20 Head Radical YOUTEK IG MP. go figure
 
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