Does Stenciling your strings reduce snap-back

djkahn86

Rookie
Just got a new poly string job and stenciled it.....now I am wondering if I just increased the coefficient of friction thereby making it more difficult for the strings to snap-back.

Did I just screw myself.. a little... or am I over-thinking it?:shock:
 

stoo

Semi-Pro
However, you have now added an additional "layer" to your strings, therefore creating a height difference in surface where the "edge" of the stencil ink meets the strings with no ink on. Would this then not create an additional gripping device to help spin the ball, similar to that of grooves on the face of a golf club gripping and spinning a golf ball???
 

thebigz

Rookie
Im using a white permanent marker to stencil my black strings, and they are just fine. I use regular stencil ink for all other colors, just never found a good white stencil and a permanent marker is not bad.
 

hyperion99

Semi-Pro
Just got a new poly string job and stenciled it.....now I am wondering if I just increased the coefficient of friction thereby making it more difficult for the strings to snap-back.

Did I just screw myself.. a little... or am I over-thinking it?:shock:
If there is a difference it's extremely minimal.
 

penguin

Professional
If there was anything to this (or was even remotely plausible) they would sell a superexpensive high grade of "low-friction" stencil paint and have pros endorse it. Or there would be a pro who refused to use stencil paint on principal or demanded a smaller stencil for this reason...

or maybe this already happens and helps babolat pros get more spin over Wilson... (j/k)
 

Sparkyovcov

Semi-Pro
It must effect a little.
Would a golfer put ink on there club for added spin/grip? No.....they want it as clean as possible.
 

gut wax

Hall of Fame
ATP and WTA Professionals have long had *what* on string bed of teach and every racquet, be it new or restrung?
 

djkahn86

Rookie
I did ... 6-1,6-0,6-2,6-1,10-5
one of those glory nights
fresh poly strung lower than I ever have before... so comfortable
will have to go even lower next time..

thanks for not burning me too bad for this question..
 

Don't Let It Bounce

Hall of Fame
I don't think it's a bad question at all. There's a section of TWU dedicated to examining the connection between spin and low-friction surfaces. The friction difference between one poly and another is very small, so it makes sense to me to wonder what an added substance will do to that friction.

My guess, and that's all it is, is that there wouldn't be much of an impact, if there was any. Ink on the mains wouldn't matter, and the ink on the crosses would have to be really close to a main to be in that main's range of movement. And even if it were, I don't know if the main would slide on top of the ink or push the ink out of the way, and that might make a difference.

Of course, not inking is the way to be absolutely sure of zero impact on spin – and if no one is paying you to ink, why add to the world's logo pollution?
 
I actually do think it makes a difference at least on the cheap pre strung racquets. On these rackets if you you pull a stenciled main string to the side there is a huge increase in friction and a loss of snapback compared to the non stenciled strings. However, this could be because the ink they use on these cheap racquets is lesser quality.
 

scotus

G.O.A.T.
Just got a new poly string job and stenciled it.....now I am wondering if I just increased the coefficient of friction thereby making it more difficult for the strings to snap-back.

Did I just screw myself.. a little... or am I over-thinking it?:shock:
Buy a bottle of Teflon-based stencil ink made by Bubblelot.

It will give you that extra snap-back everyone's looking for. Your kick serve will kick up 5 ft higher. Your topspin forehand will jump over your opponent's head. Your slice will hit the court and turn 120 degrees to the side.

But beware: as some former member of the forum has suggested, Teflon can cause cancer when inhaled!
 

MAX PLY

Hall of Fame
Buy a bottle of Teflon-based stencil ink made by Bubblelot.

It will give you that extra snap-back everyone's looking for. Your kick serve will kick up 5 ft higher. Your topspin forehand will jump over your opponent's head. Your slice will hit the court and turn 120 degrees to the side.

But beware: as some former member of the forum has suggested, Teflon can cause cancer when inhaled!
That's why I used lead-based, flavored stencil ink!
 
PS97 strung with Wilson Sensation and painted with logo. Used 2-4 hours a week for 4 month and the crosses and mains have barely worn into one another. Restrung with same string but without painting the logo and only lasted 12 hours before the strings cut show notching 1/3 of the way in. So, in my short example it did matter. Other people's experience may vary though.
 

skydog

Semi-Pro
It must effect a little.
Would a golfer put ink on there club for added spin/grip? No.....they want it as clean as possible.
Its against the rules of golf to add a substance to your club face. Gamblers have been know to put a film of Vaseline on their driver face to reduce side spin and rub chalk across the face of their wedges to increase spin. Both are illegal.
 
A but too meticulous don't you think? But to answer your question; poly barely holds the ink as it is. The layer of ink will rub off in a couple hits then it'll be poly sliding on poly (like normal) rather than poly on ink, and even then it still makes negligible difference.
 
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