Dolgopolov match fixing

reaper

Legend
The ATP should have an official who automatically reviews the video of a match with a betting pattern like this. If that official deems the player to have a case to answer re tanking for the purpose of executing a betting sting, he faces charges at a tribunal with his career on the line.
 

Shaolin

G.O.A.T.
The ATP should have an official who automatically reviews the video of a match with a betting pattern like this. If that official deems the player to have a case to answer re tanking for the purpose of executing a betting sting, he faces charges at a tribunal with his career on the line.

They have the Tennis Integrity Unit. This will be reviewed thoroughly I'm sure.
 

tennis_pro

Bionic Poster
Yeah, the odds were very weird for this match. I'm pretty sure he sold the match and most bookies knew.

He's gonna regret his decision to fix this match for a very long time.
 
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tennis_pro

Bionic Poster
The only way the bookies find out is through an irrational amount of money for one player over another. The victims in this if it was fixed are bookmakers who hold bets on the winner and punters who bet on Dolgopolov unaware he's not trying.
My only question is how did the information that the match was fixed leak out (and then spread so fast)? Nobody with a little common sense would bet on Monteiro unless they knew something fishy was gonna happen. Even 1,36 odds on Dolgopolov felt way too high against someone who literally can't play on a hard court at this level.

My God, I fear for Dolgopolov. One of my favorite players and this could the end of him. Match fixing is basically on par with doping.
 

reaper

Legend
They have the Tennis Integrity Unit. This will be reviewed thoroughly I'm sure.
Yes, I should have read the article more closely...The match has only just been played. One thing that looks bad for Dolgopolov is that it's only one week out from the USO. If he's got an injury so severe he can't play competitively against such a modest opponent, why is he risking aggravating it to try and qualify for a minor event when the rational thing to do would be take the week off and try to be right for the USO.
 

reaper

Legend
My only question is how did the information that the match was fixed leak out (and then spread so fast)? Nobody with a little common sense would bet on Monteiro unless they knew something fishy was gonna happen.

My God, I fear for Dolgopolov. One of my favorite players and this could the end of him.
In these types of cases the news doesn't really spread. An individual close to the player operates a number of betting accounts with each bookmaker. That one person gets as much money on as they possibly can. It presents as a whole lot of people placing bets when it's really just one or two people.
 

killerboi2

Hall of Fame
Match fixing should be legal anyway imo. It's Dog's match, his time, he should be allowed to play how he wants. If people are dumb enough to bet wrongly and bookies gullible enough to take certain bets then it's all good to me. No sympathy for those mugs. With the amount earned at the top, it would silly for non mugs to start fixing matches for money.
 

every7

Hall of Fame
It is hard to imagine a talented guy like Dolgopolov bothering to associate with this sort of element. He can have a much better life and earn just as much being an entertainer going deep in lower tier tournaments and making the odd run at bigger tournaments the same way players like Monfils, Kohli etc etc do. He doesn't need to bother with match-fixers.

Also, organised criminals general prefer to "get to" lower profile players who are in more desperate financial situations, and thus more likely to entertain alternative revenue streams. Also much safer to matchfix lower profile matches that will not attract attentions of TIU.

The only thing I can think of is there have been some attempts at forcing him to do it, similar to situations that involved Kafelnikov, Safin, Davydenko by degenerates who have misjudged the situations.

I will assume his innocence implicitly, unless I see reason to think otherwise.

Match fixing should be legal anyway imo. It's Dog's match, his time, he should be allowed to play how he wants. If people are dumb enough to bet wrongly and bookies gullible enough to take certain bets then it's all good to me. No sympathy for those mugs. With the amount earned at the top, it would silly for non mugs to start fixing matches for money.
This is not a good way of thinking about it imo. You're encouraging corruptions, and at the end of the day we are robbed as spectators by potentially not seeing the best tennis. Also, if you match fix, you actually don't get to play how you want. You are compromised in that you are forced to play possibly how you don't want to, in order to orchestrate a certain result. Very, very bad. Dolgopolov would earn way more continuing to play as he normally does, getting to the odd lower tier final and doing well as an entertainer style player, rather than playing into the hands of degenerate gamblers and risking his entire career.
 
Match fixing should be legal anyway imo. It's Dog's match, his time, he should be allowed to play how he wants. If people are dumb enough to bet wrongly and bookies gullible enough to take certain bets then it's all good to me. No sympathy for those mugs. With the amount earned at the top, it would silly for non mugs to start fixing matches for money.
Lol how about no

Thats how you turn the ATP World Tour and the sport of tennis into an absolute joke and then 1) no one would pay to watch it, 2) no one would bet on it, and 3) no one would end up playing it because of 1

There is no place for fixing any sporting event
 

killerboi2

Hall of Fame
Lol how about no

Thats how you turn the ATP World Tour and the sport of tennis into an absolute joke and then 1) no one would pay to watch it, 2) no one would bet on it, and 3) no one would end up playing it because of 1

There is no place for fixing any sporting event
Of course people will still watch it... hell it probably goes on right now. As long as players aren't shouting about it and keep it under wraps then it's all fair game imo. If bookmakers, (who often prey on weak willed, addicted individuals anyway) fall for players hustle, then it's on them. People for sure will still bet on it... infact it actually adds more spice to betting imo.
 
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Attila_the_gorilla

Guest
Of course people will still watch it... hell it probably goes on right now. As long as players aren't shouting about it and keep it under wraps then it's all fair game imo. If bookmakers, (who often prey on weak willed, addicted individuals anyway) fall for players hustle, then it's on them. People for sure will still bet on it... infact it actually adds more spice to betting imo.
At the end of it all, it's not the bookies that lose. They ALWAYS win. It's the unsuspecting betting public.
 

TheFifthSet

Legend
Not sure of the veracity of this, but here's a comment I found in the comments section of that blog post:

A couple of months ago, I analyzed all ATP main tour matches since 2004. I looked at price drifts of more than 10% from Pinnacle starting price. Then I sorted by player. Guess who's on top of that list...

#1: Alexandr Dolgopolov





:eek:
 

tennisaddict

Bionic Poster
I don't believe Dolgopolov would do this.

Monteiro had won their previous match recently at Gstaad. Why could he not take advantage of a not fully fit Dolgopolov ?

Somebody in the inner circles knew Dolgo was unfit and must have placed huge odds on this starting the chain reaction.
 

reaper

Legend
All sports betting should be illegal.
That's a disaster for sports like tennis. The biggest illegal sports betting market in the world is cricket betting in India. It made the sport globally rife for corruption. With situations like the Dolgopolov one, registered betting agencies hold bets, with a name attached to the bet. That provides authorities with the starting point for an investigation, making the sport cleaner.
 

VladBurn

Rookie
I havent watched that match, but I can tell you that this guy made my bets fail a few times ( and so did Gasquet and Lajovic too ).
 

Vanilla Slice

Professional
All sports betting should be illegal.
It's an interesting phenomenon depending on where you live.

I live in the US so sports bettin is actually not legal everywhere or in every circumstance but is slowly becoming legalized across the nation (each state decides it's own laws). I enjoy the sports betting cause I want to see how it goes in America, but our national sports are inside the country so I think less big money goes around.

Sports like tennis are international sports with players from all over living all over making little money at times (NBA/MLB/NFL minimum contracts are 400k or more), so the sports betting corrupts individuals much more easily.

Are u from the US or from another country with different laws?
 
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Attila_the_gorilla

Guest
Get rid of it altogether... hmm another interesting concept. Wonder what the addicts would do then though, lmao.
They would have no way to get addicted in the first place. They could still go out and lose their money if they want by playing poker, lotto or all sorts of gambling.

But sports should attempt to keep questionable practices and characters away. With sports betting, you attract these dodgy things. I have a feeling match fixing happens a lot more than we're aware of.
 

tennisaddict

Bionic Poster
Not sure of the veracity of this, but here's a comment I found in the comments section of that blog post:

A couple of months ago, I analyzed all ATP main tour matches since 2004. I looked at price drifts of more than 10% from Pinnacle starting price. Then I sorted by player. Guess who's on top of that list...

#1: Alexandr Dolgopolov





:eek:
Not Tomic ? I guess people have lost belied in him totally.
 

The Green Mile

Bionic Poster
Wouldn't be surprised, I've watched so many strange Dolgo matches over the years. 2013, I remember there were a lot of curious Dolgo matches with a lot "match fixing" talk being thrown around as well...
 
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Attila_the_gorilla

Guest
That's a disaster for sports like tennis. The biggest illegal sports betting market in the world is cricket betting in India. It made the sport globally rife for corruption. With situations like the Dolgopolov one, registered betting agencies hold bets, with a name attached to the bet. That provides authorities with the starting point for an investigation, making the sport cleaner.
The point is there would be a lot more money involved if betting there was legal. More money: more incentive for corruption. Where there is a will, there is a way.
 

Al Czervik

Hall of Fame
It is hard to imagine a talented guy like Dolgopolov bothering to associate with this sort of element. He can have a much better life and earn just as much being an entertainer going deep in lower tier tournaments and making the odd run at bigger tournaments the same way players like Monfils, Kohli etc etc do. He doesn't need to bother with match-fixers.
I felt this way about Davydenko. The guy was good enough that there is almost no way the match fixing money could be worth the risk. I wonder in some of these cases if these guys have their safety threatened.
 

reaper

Legend
The point is there would be a lot more money involved if betting there was legal. More money: more incentive for corruption. Where there is a will, there is a way.
That's not necessarily the case. The volumes of money where betting is illegal can be enormous. Legal betting will involve more people, but usually on a smaller scale. Illegal betting induces organised crime and distorts markets, with the market distortion driving turnover.
 

The Green Mile

Bionic Poster
I felt this way about Davydenko. The guy was good enough that there is almost no way the match fixing money could be worth the risk. I wonder in some of these cases if these guys have their safety threatened.
You should read this. Davydenko and the Russian mafia were quite clearly linked.

http://tennispurist.blogspot.co.nz/2016/01/tennis-match-fixing-and-corruption.html

Could be purely coincidental, but Davydenko got the most "lack of effort" warnings from umpires, that I've ever seen from a single player.
 
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Attila_the_gorilla

Guest
That's not necessarily the case. The volumes of money where betting is illegal can be enormous. Legal betting will involve more people, but usually on a smaller scale. Illegal betting induces organised crime and distorts markets, with the market distortion driving turnover.
Nothing stops organized crime from getting involved in sports betting anywhere in the world.
 

BeatlesFan

Bionic Poster
I hope it ain't so but I have to admit it would explain a lot about Dolgo's chronic inconsistency and strangely up and down performances.
I've often wondered about it too, but dismissed match fixing because Dolgo is already quite rich. He's won almost 7 million dollars just on-court and probably twice that off court. He doesn't need to match fix, he's a good enough player to be top 20 for another 2-3 years just with his talent. Sad story if true.
 

killerboi2

Hall of Fame
At the end of it all, it's not the bookies that lose. They ALWAYS win. It's the unsuspecting betting public.
Anyone betting high on tennis is likely playing with some serious fire anyway, especially on unpredictable players like Dolgopolov. I quite like the concept of an anything goes type environment, where fixing is allowed. Bookies will have to think twice on who to trust and what not. Either get rid of betting or go all out in my opinion.
 

Bartelby

Bionic Poster
Online betting organisations are themselves quasi-criminal scams.

They refuse to take any further bets from people who have a reasonable track record of winning big.

And they refuse to pay out by hunting through the fine print.

In short, they don't work with the regular percentages of bookmakers. They seek super-profits.
 

reaper

Legend
Nothing stops organized crime from getting involved in sports betting anywhere in the world.
That's true, but the scale of their involvement is influenced by transparency. If betting was illegal, nothing untoward would have come to light regarding this Dolgopolov match. With betting fluctuations readily available, It's clearly a match of interest to the authorities. The names of the account holders who bet on Dolgopolov are known, so patterns of those people backing suspicious winners can be tracked. It establishes a starting point for investigation/prosecution. If betting's illegal the fix still happens, none of this sees the light of day, so further fixing happens with impunity.
 
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Attila_the_gorilla

Guest
Anyone betting high on tennis is likely playing with some serious fire anyway, especially on unpredictable players like Dolgopolov. I quite like the concept of an anything goes type environment, where fixing is allowed. Bookies will have to think twice on who to trust and what not. Either get rid of betting or go all out in my opinion.
?? So you would watch tennis even if it all became a scripted farce? The player's only goal would be not to win, but to make-believe and trick the public?
 

reaper

Legend
Online betting organisations are themselves quasi-criminal scams.

They refuse to take any further bets from people who have a reasonable track record of winning big.

And they refuse to pay out by hunting through the fine print.

In short, they don't work with the regular percentages of bookmakers. They seek super-profits.
You don't actually need a record of winning big to be banned by many online bookmakers. A history of backing market firmers or breaking square on your betting can see an account closed. What use are you to them if you don't lose money?
 
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Attila_the_gorilla

Guest
That's true, but the scale of their involvement is influenced by transparency. If betting was illegal, nothing untoward would have come to light regarding this Dolgopolov match. With betting fluctuations readily available, It's clearly a match of interest to the authorities. The names of the account holders who bet on Dolgopolov are known, so patterns of those people backing suspicious winners can be tracked. It establishes a starting point for investigation/prosecution. If betting's illegal the fix still happens, none of this sees the light of day, so further fixing happens with impunity.
You can still have underground markets and bookies even where betting is legal.
My concern with match fixing is solely the unsuspecting, genuine betting men losing their money. Those unsuspecting, honest betting men would be much less likely to place their bets if the only option they had were unregulated, dodgy underground bookies.
 

reaper

Legend
You can still have underground markets and bookies even where betting is legal.
My concern with match fixing is solely the unsuspecting, genuine betting men losing their money. Those unsuspecting, honest betting men would be much less likely to place their bets with an unregulated, dodgy underground bookie.
Your honest unsuspecting betting man is unlikely to seek out an underground bookie where legal betting exists and is taxed at a rate low enough so that betting odds are "fair." If that doesn't exist, they'll seek out someone providing the service they want.
 
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Attila_the_gorilla

Guest
Your honest unsuspecting betting man is unlikely to seek out an underground bookie where legal betting exists and is taxed at a rate low enough so that betting odds are "fair." If that doesn't exist, they'll seek out someone providing the service they want.
No, they won't "seek out someone providing the service they want", not if it means committing a crime and dealing with criminals. They are a lot less likely to get involved at all if it's illegal. That's the whole point.
 

Bartelby

Bionic Poster
It is a form of market-rigging and should be illegal under the terms of their license.

The lack of anonymity in online gambling just leads to cherry-pcking by algorithm.

This is more exploitation than bookmaking.
You don't actually need a record of winning big to be banned by many online bookmakers. A history of backing market firmers or breaking square on your betting can see an account closed. What use are you to them if you don't lose money?
 
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reaper

Legend
No, they won't "seek out someone providing the service they want", not if it means committing a crime and dealing with criminals. They are a lot less likely to get involved at all if it's illegal. That's the whole point.
You're from Australia. The scale of SP bookmaking in Australia prior to the introduction of the TAB suggests otherwise.
 
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Attila_the_gorilla

Guest

Fabresque

Hall of Fame
Nothing new with this clown, he had weird betting patterns in many matches before this. Wasted talent, that's all.
 

reaper

Legend
Have you made a comparison of the scale of it all before and after? Today sports betting is a national disease in Australia. It's promoted everywhere, even by sports commentators, and people keep falling for it.

http://www.smh.com.au/business/the-...-in-one-depressing-chart-20150901-gjd2w1.html
The scale of betting was much bigger in Australia in the past than it is now...but the medium has changed. It used to be primarily horse racing where betting was legal but had legal (on track bookmakers) and illegal (SP bookmakers) sides. Illegal betting on football was large scale but only engaged in by a small amount of people. Today poker machines are the main problem, with international gambling agencies trying to normalise sports betting through their heavy promotion which the sports tacitly support because they receive a percentage of turnover as a revenue source. Gambling should be subject to far more regulation than it is, through banning promotion and sponsorship which has seen agents of gambling companies embedded in the coverage of the sport. Where I don't agree is that it should be illegal. If someone thinks Kyrgios will beat Dimitrov or vice versa they should have the right to bet on it. It's something that should be permitted by law, but not encouraged through saturation marketing.
 
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