Drop your racket before swinging

Recently I discovered a great tennis technique. When hitting a forehand you should, after you moved your racket backwards and just before hitting the ball drop your racket (while still holding it of course) so it will fall to the ground. This way it will make it easier for you to swing from low to high and therefore will give you a better shot. It especially works very well on balls which land short as you need to give them more spin when hitting them back.

Reminds me of all the coaches I had who never ever told me this. They could only say "you have to hit from low to high, you have to hit from low to high", if you let your racket drop you automatically hit from low to high. Focusing on hitting from low to high forces you to make a less smooth swing and therefore will give you poor shots.
 

Chas Tennis

G.O.A.T.
Recently I discovered a great tennis technique. When hitting a forehand you should, after you moved your racket backwards and just before hitting the ball drop your racket (while still holding it of course) so it will fall to the ground. This way it will make it easier for you to swing from low to high and therefore will give you a better shot. It especially works very well on balls which land short as you need to give them more spin when hitting them back.

Reminds me of all the coaches I had who never ever told me this. They could only say "you have to hit from low to high, you have to hit from low to high", if you let your racket drop you automatically hit from low to high. Focusing on hitting from low to high forces you to make a less smooth swing and therefore will give you poor shots.
There have been some recent post on bringing the racket down on the one hand backhand. During those discussions some posters viewed the racket's coming down as falling from gravity.

In the high level backhand the racket comes down much faster, indication that muscle forces are being added to gravity to bring it down.

For the high level one hand backhand, I am not able to work out rigorously how fast the racket would fall from gravity since one end is supported from the shoulder and the arm is not dropping as fast as the racket because it rotates. But I calculated racket free fall time from gravity and compared it to the time the racket lowers in high level one hand backhands. The racket is often lowered much faster using the off arm and hitting arm than it can free fall. This means that the off arm and maybe the hitting arm is supplying additional muscle forces to move the racket down. Of course, the racket can move down much faster with muscle forces. The word 'drop' implies that the racket is falling from gravity and some posters have believed that.

To check this for yourself hold a racket up high as you see in high level one hand backhands. Suddenly relax your muscles and let the racket drop only from gravity. Video how the arm and racket drop from gravity. Compare that position vs time to that of a high level one hand backhand.

I have a video where the racket drop time for Gasquest's backhand is measured for a forceful backhand. If anyone videos their backhand with high racket - simply dropping from gravity - we can compare the times.
 
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mad dog1

G.O.A.T.
Recently I discovered a great tennis technique. When hitting a forehand you should, after you moved your racket backwards and just before hitting the ball drop your racket (while still holding it of course) so it will fall to the ground. This way it will make it easier for you to swing from low to high and therefore will give you a better shot. It especially works very well on balls which land short as you need to give them more spin when hitting them back.

Reminds me of all the coaches I had who never ever told me this. They could only say "you have to hit from low to high, you have to hit from low to high", if you let your racket drop you automatically hit from low to high. Focusing on hitting from low to high forces you to make a less smooth swing and therefore will give you poor shots.
The racquet head drops automatically if you keep the muscles in the forearm loose. If the forearm muscles are tense from gripping the handle too tight, the racquet head won’t drop. Most rec players grip the handle too tightly because they use their arm to muscle the ball.
 

user92626

G.O.A.T.
Recently I discovered a great tennis technique. When hitting a forehand you should, after you moved your racket backwards and just before hitting the ball drop your racket (while still holding it of course) so it will fall to the ground. This way it will make it easier for you to swing from low to high and therefore will give you a better shot. It especially works very well on balls which land short as you need to give them more spin when hitting them back.

Reminds me of all the coaches I had who never ever told me this. They could only say "you have to hit from low to high, you have to hit from low to high", if you let your racket drop you automatically hit from low to high. Focusing on hitting from low to high forces you to make a less smooth swing and therefore will give you poor shots.
So you need to be told that the racket has to go below the ball before you can hit "from low to high"?

I would think that we hire coaches for very complex stuff that we cannot figure out by ourselves. Well, maybe money is cheap for you. :)
 

Stretchy Man

Professional
I would think that we hire coaches for very complex stuff that we cannot figure out by ourselves. Well, maybe money is cheap for you. :)
If you think this thread is below you, maybe you shouldn't be posting on it? Just stick to the more 'advanced' topics.

Mike's advice is good. I'm not sure why anyone is making fun of it. I have heard at least one coach telling kids to hit low to high and it's poor advice. :confused:
 

Ruark

Professional
I have heard at least one coach telling kids to hit low to high and it's poor advice. :confused:
I remember a "head pro" in a large city of over 4 million telling her clinic students to not only hit from low to high, but to "brush" the ball, and take the word "hit" out of their brains. So you had all these 2.5 - 3.0 clinic students trying to "brush" the ball, swinging their rackets almost vertically, and hitting them halfway into orbit, if they hit them at all.

It's yet another example of pros teaching what happens during a stroke, instead of what that specific student needs to do during a stroke. If you make the stroke properly the racket will take a sufficiently low-to-high path without you deliberately doing anything.
 

J011yroger

Talk Tennis Guru
I remember a "head pro" in a large city of over 4 million telling her clinic students to not only hit from low to high, but to "brush" the ball, and take the word "hit" out of their brains. So you had all these 2.5 - 3.0 clinic students trying to "brush" the ball, swinging their rackets almost vertically, and hitting them halfway into orbit, if they hit them at all.

It's yet another example of pros teaching what happens during a stroke, instead of what that specific student needs to do during a stroke. If you make the stroke properly the racket will take a sufficiently low-to-high path without you deliberately doing anything.
Hmmmm, don't know about that.

Definitely agree that brush is awful and low to high isn't much better.

J
 

user92626

G.O.A.T.
If you think this thread is below you, maybe you shouldn't be posting on it? Just stick to the more 'advanced' topics.

Mike's advice is good. I'm not sure why anyone is making fun of it. I have heard at least one coach telling kids to hit low to high and it's poor advice. :confused:
Maybe you shouldn't be thinking so low of your fellowmen. You should be joining me to encourage people to be more self reliant. Set the bar a bit higher for themselves.
 

ChaelAZ

G.O.A.T.
Reminds me of all the coaches I had who never ever told me this. They could only say "you have to hit from low to high, you have to hit from low to high", if you let your racket drop you automatically hit from low to high. Focusing on hitting from low to high forces you to make a less smooth swing and therefore will give you poor shots.
Interesting, though I find a lot of old school coaches still use the 'low to high' vernacular, but that is early 2000's speak. Unit Turn, racquet drop, lag (if you will) and rotation, with extension and finish all have been pushed since. Even the online coaching community grabbed this and rode it.
http://rotation
YouTube Racquet Drop
 
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