Duck walking?

LeeD

Bionic Poster
Hi guys....
Watching the local little girls warm up for tennis, I noticed the Dad made the girls duckwalk from one sideline to the other, and back. This after the initial jog 5 times around the perimeter and some other things.
Is this good training? I'm wondering, because it looks wierd, but I guess, more is better than less, when it comes to physical conditioning.
 

surfsb

Rookie
Duck walk is a lot of stress to put your quads under for a warm up. Doesn't seem like a good idea.
 

LeeD

Bionic Poster
The girls jog around the whole court 5 times, jog once around backwards, do some stretches and toe touches, then do the duckwall across and back.
It's a strain on my legs, but I'm 65. They are 12 and 15.
 

WildVolley

Legend
I think for most of us, the duck walk is a rather good stretch. Probably too much of a stretch to do as part of a warm up. I'd rather do it as part of a cool down.

I'd have my players do different jogging, backwards, shuffles, cross overs (carioca) and shadow swings to warm up. Basically, drills that are related to the movements to be performed.

I never move around a tennis court in the duck walk position, so I wouldn't make it part of my warm up.
 

LeeD

Bionic Poster
Could it be related to strength and flexibility training?
The older does it really well, while the younger cheats and doesn't go all the way down, but the younger is a top 12 year old girl in NorCal.
 

surfsb

Rookie
The girls jog around the whole court 5 times, jog once around backwards, do some stretches and toe touches, then do the duckwall across and back.
It's a strain on my legs, but I'm 65. They are 12 and 15.
Still. Would it make sense to add hindu squats into mix? Duck walk seems more like a muscular workout than a warm up. Everything they're doing up to that point is aerobic and about increasing blood flow and oxygen to body to reduce injury. There's an aerobic aspect to duck walking but is it worth 1) unnecessarily tiring your quads if you're going to practice for a long time or play a match and 2) possible injury by tracking your knees wrong if you get off balance.
 

LeeD

Bionic Poster
Actually, I already do the Groucho walk, my first 17 or so steps after sitting down for more than 15 minutes. After around my 10th step, my back loosens up a bit, and I can work my way to a standing position as I walk.
Best is my "cripple" walk, after playing too much tennis. My back is pretty upright, my feet take little steps, and there is no swivelling from the hips thru the shoulders, so it's all legs until I make the car.
 
I've been doing the Duck Walk as part of my training routine for the past year and I think it's good for strengthening the legs. I could barely do a few steps when I first started, now I can do about 20 steps back and forth.

I wouldn't use it for a warm up though.... you're legs are likely to tire out earlier when playing.
 

LeeD

Bionic Poster
Well, that explains why I can only play 4 tough sets of doubles..:):)
OTOH, I can only play 4 tough sets of doubles a day even when I don't warm up at all..:)
I go with the kids, across the net from alley to alley, that's all.
 

LeeD

Bionic Poster
Not buying those studies.
If you believe every study, you might be tempted to stay home, never go up or down a staircase, never turn on the heater, never ever a stove, and we all know, taking a shower is EXTREMELY dangerous.
I DO buy... most everything in moderation.
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
^^ Good info, Chas. For much of the population, the duck walk, deep knee bends or full squats may put much too much stress on the cartilage and ligaments of the knees. For those with knee issues, it might be a definite no-no.

http://articles.chicagotribune.com/1985-12-04/entertainment/8503240334_1_exercises-stretching-school-gym-classes



OTOH, it may be ok for some. Witness the Vietnamese or Asian squat. I've seen plenty of fairly old Vietnamese sitting in this squat position -- with apparently no ill effects on the knees. It has been speculated that this ability is due, in part, to anatomical differences. A large part can also be attributed to the fact that many Asians sit this way fairly early in childhood, while their bodies are very flexible. They continue the practice as they get older -- which may keep the ligaments & cartilage from tightening up. The Asian squat may or may not translate to the ability to perform (full squat) duck walks.

Do the Groucho walk instead. It is the less strenuous version of the duck walk, and you can crack jokes while doing it.
A duck walk employing a half squat (1st image above) rather than a full squat may be preferred for most individuals. Refer to 1st link below. A variation of the Groucho walk may also be a preferred alternative to a full-squat duck walk. The last 2 links show 2 variations of this.

http://livehealthy.chron.com/walking-like-duck-exercises-5383.html
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a3rdOUNr8XE
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lgrTuNb_WxU
 
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LeeD

Bionic Poster
I can't be sure of a real connection, but it seems people with flat or flattish feet find duckwalking effortless, and squatting also.
Seems people with high arches have problems getting down into a squat, and need to raise their heels in an unbalanced position.
Possibly this is just a small sample based on my observation, and not neccesarily universal.
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
^ There may or may not be a connection. To be sure, however, anatomy appears to play an important role in both the efficacy and safety of a full (squat) duck walk.
.
 

LeeD

Bionic Poster
Anatomy...
Not sure what you mean. How about flexibility?
I"m the stiffest human ever, barely reach to within 6" of the ground when I bend over.
That shoulder flexibility test, one arm over a shoulder, the other around the waist, I come up around 14" short of touching.
I can duck walk around a tennis court pretty easily.
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
^ Flexibility is certainly part of the anatomy issue. It could include the skeletal structure of the feet and legs, the length of the legs relative to the body, the structure of the knees, the length and elasticity of the ligaments of the knees and ankles, the structure of the hips, tightness of specific muscles and fascia, etc.

Note that the flexibility of your shoulder and core may have very little to do with the flexibility of your knees and other parts of your legs. I am fairly flexible in some areas but, like you, are very tight/stiff in other areas. My quads are very tight whereas my hamstrings are not.
.
 
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SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
^^ It occurred to me that your lower half may be more limber/flexible than your stiff upper half due to surfing. Possibility?
.
 

boramiNYC

Hall of Fame
Deep squat is only dangerous due to stiffness of general population. And there are a lot of physical problems and suboptimal conditions in general population.

Every single human being is anatomically designed to be able to deep squat. Most people just grew quite stiff esp lower back soft tissues and cannot deep squat and if forced could injure themselves. Hence all the warnings and defensive positions from health care professionals and coaches and trainers. This should not be confused as that there's an inherent danger of deep squatting.

The state of physical condition of the general population is so abysmal compared to the full potential of human physical capability when we watch great athletes doing their stuff it feels so foreign and out of your world.

Being able to deep squat is a sign of good flexibility and should be a goal of every individual who wants to improve their physical condition, move better, and feel better.
 

Stanimal

Rookie
I'm finding in most of squat/jump exercises my back isn't the problem, but the knees and supporting muscles there. I can hang with some intense workouts, but ones with 16-32 repeat squats/jumps/dips really are a grind
 

LeeD

Bionic Poster
For Suresh....
I usually show up before they do.
I gotta wait around while they do the stretch, warmup, jog, warmup, then duckwalk routine. No one else is on the courts, so I watch.
 

Fintft

Legend
^^ Good info, Chas. For much of the population, the duck walk, deep knee bends or full squats may put much too much stress on the cartilage and ligaments of the knees. For those with knee issues, it might be a definite no-no.

http://articles.chicagotribune.com/1985-12-04/entertainment/8503240334_1_exercises-stretching-school-gym-classes



OTOH, it may be ok for some. Witness the Vietnamese or Asian squat. I've seen plenty of fairly old Vietnamese sitting in this squat position -- with apparently no ill effects on the knees. It has been speculated that this ability is due, in part, to anatomical differences. A large part can also be attributed to the fact that many Asians sit this way fairly early in childhood, while their bodies are very flexible. They continue the practice as they get older -- which may keep the ligaments & cartilage from tightening up. The Asian squat may or may not translate to the ability to perform (full squat) duck walks.



A duck walk employing a half squat (1st image above) rather than a full squat may be preferred for most individuals. Refer to 1st link below. A variation of the Groucho walk may also be a preferred alternative to a full-squat duck walk. The last 2 links show 2 variations of this.

http://livehealthy.chron.com/walking-like-duck-exercises-5383.html
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a3rdOUNr8XE
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lgrTuNb_WxU
Of curse buddy and I remember how many volleyball players had their meniscus blown, due to duck walking in training!
 
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