Duel Match Stats/Reports - Djokovic vs Federer, Year End Championship final, 2012 & round robin, 2013

Waspsting

Hall of Fame
Novak Djokovic beat Roger Federer 7-6(5), 7-5 in the Year End Championship (World Tour Finals) final, 2012 on indoor hard court in London England

It was Djokovic's 2nd title at the event and first of a record 4 in a year. The two players had been locked in a battle for year end number 1, with Federer regaining the top spot briefly after winning Wimbledon (beating Djokovic in the semi-final). Djokovic ended up comfortably claiming the top spot

Djokovic won 96 points, Federer 95

Serve Stats
Djokovic...
- 1st serve percentage (69/98) 70%
- 1st serve points won (43/69) 62%
- 2nd serve points won (14/29) 48%
- Aces 6, Service Winners 1
- Double Faults 2
- Unreturned Serve Percentage (21/98) 21%

Federer...
- 1st serve percentage (57/93) 61%
- 1st serve points won (35/57) 61%
- 2nd serve points won (19/36) 53%
- Aces 8
- Double Faults 2
- Unreturned Serve Percentage (22/93) 24%

Serve Pattern
Djokovic served...
- to FH 35%
- to BH 63%
- to Body 2%

Federer served...
- to FH 35%
- to BH 58%
- to Body 7%

Return Stats
Djokovic made...
- 69 (25 FH, 44 BH), including 1 runaround FH
- 14 Errors, comprising...
- 1 Unforced (1 FH)
- 13 Forced (6 FH, 7 BH)
- Return Rate (69/91) 76%

Federer made...
- 75 (29 FH, 46 BH), including 1 runaround FH & 2 return-approaches
- 14 Errors, comprising...
- 3 Unforced (1 FH, 2 BH)
- 11 Forced (4 FH, 7 BH)
- Return Rate (75/96) 78%

Break Points
Djokovic 4/7 (5 games)
Federer 3/7 (4 games)

Winners (including returns, excluding aces)
Djokovic 11 (7 FH, 3 BH, 1 BHV)
Federer 20 (9 FH, 4 BH, 5 FHV, 1 BHV, 1 OH)

Djokovic's FHs - 3 cc (1 pass and 1 touching serving line but not counted a net point), 1 dtl (hit from outside the court) and 3 inside-out (1 pass)
- BHs - 2 inside-out and 1 dtl pass

Federer's FHs - 4 cc (1 pass at net), 1 dtl pass, 1 inside-out and 3 inside-in (1 pass)
- BHs - 2 dtl, 1 inside-out and 1 drop shot

- 1 FHV was a swinging shot from behind service line but counted a net point and 1 was a drop

Errors (excluding returns and serves)
Djokovic 51
- 28 Unforced (10 FH, 18 BH)
- 23 Forced (10 FH, 12 BH, 1 BHV)
Unforced Error Forcefulness Index 49.3

Federer 62
- 39 Unforced (24 FH, 15 BH)
- 23 Forced (13 FH, 8 BH, 1 FHV, 1 BHV)
Unforced Error Forcefulness Index 47.2

(Note 1: all half-volleys refer to such shots played at net. Half -volleys played from other parts of the court are included within relevant groundstroke counts)

(Note 2: The 'Unforced Error Forcefulness Index is a measure of how aggressive of intent the average UE made was. 60 is maximum, 20 is minimum. This match has been scored using a four point scale - 2 defensive, 4 neutral, 5 attacking, 6 winner attempt)

Net Points & Serve-Volley
Djokovic was...
- 4/10 (40%) at net

Federer was...
- 12/17 (71%) at net, with...
- 0/2 return-approaching

Match Report
A very good match and about as even as even can be. Have a look at -

- Points - Djokovic 96, Federer 95
- Unreturned serves - Djokovic 21, Federer 22
- Break points - Djokovic 4/7, Federer 3/7
- Points in rallies - Djokovic 73, Federer 71

Winners to Unforced Errors ratio is on the high side - as it should be in such conditions. When it isn't, its a sign of either an time great performance/match and/or one player being exceptionally badly in defence

Court is slow-ish and near perfect for encouraging all court tennis. Good serving is rewarded but returns can be made for rallies to go on, good returning is rewarded (somewhat less), shot making is rewarded but not decisively so, consistency of shot is important. The last mentioned would probably be key to the match in these conditions and Djokovic has the advantage in that area (28 UEs to 39 for Fed), but its a few-key-points and could-have-gone-either-way match. And Djoko steps to the plate better in those moments

Djoko starts slow and Federer fast - and the latter wins 12 of the first 13 points to start the match. And starts game 4 with a stunning FH cc winner, but Djoko struggles through to hold a 10 point game, finishing with a brilliant winner of his own, FH dtl from outside the court. And breaks back next game to restore parity - errors from his opponent being the main cause

Rest of the set is tough. Server has the advantage (as he should) but the returner has chances (as is optimal for a good match). Djoko breaks in a gritty, 18 point game to leave himself serving for the set. Federer though breaks back, as Djoko makes a pair of premature winner attempt errors to open the door. On a key point, Fed wins a who-blinks-first BH-BH rally

Djoko cuts himself badly diving in the next game. A nasty gash that I'd think would affect his play, though it doesn't appear to

Tie-break is a first class one. Fed loses the first service point, blinking with a BH error in a long rally but gains the mini-break back a couple of points later with a sublime BH dtl winner. Tough stuff from there - errors forced and unforced, usually in good rallies, but the end comes with a bad point from Fed and a great one from Djoko.

Down set point, Fed takes the net, makes a difficult first volley on the stretch. Djo runs up to meet it and place it wide, but Fed, half-retreating, is able to swivel around and dispatch a FH cc winner from just inside the serve line. A sensational point, but Fed mucks it up badly on the next. He goes for a peculiarly aggressive BH dtl/inside-out shot off the third ball and misses by a long way.... its rare for Fed to play an attacking BH third ball at best of times and he usually does when the shot is the obvious one and the court is open. Here though, it was just a routine position where he trys to make the play out of nothing... it would have been ambitious (and far from certain, probably less than 50-50) if he could makes such a shot off the FH... plenty of attacking errors from Fed in the match (10 attacking and 9 winner attempts to be precise), but this one stands out for poor shot choice and of course, the timing.

Djoko does wrap up with a superb point, drawing a not strong return, backing away all the way to the BH side to whisk away an perfect FH inside-out winner. The kind of shot even Federer would be proud of, and the kind of play Djoko tends to eschew.

Federer breaks to start the second set, an 18 point game ending with 3 Djoko UEs - 2 of them winner attempts. Match continues with not easy holds - each player surviving a break point and some longer games - but on serve til Fed steps up to serve for the set and 5-4

What happens next is uncannily similar to what would happen in the Wimbledon final this year. Not just of scoreline but even on a play-by-play level. Freaky, for now, Fed loses 4 points in a row from 40-15 up to get broken

And is broken again next chance to lose the match. Match point is sensational. Fed collars the point, starting with a strong serve and sweeps a FH inside-out (a shot he doesn't use much in the match) into the corner as he takes the net. He'd won 12/16 next points to this point, but all that matters is after it, its 12/17. Djokovic scamper over to reach the ball and while sliding and half-doing the splits pushes it perfectly BH dtl for the pass - magnificent, probably the shot of the match (and there are a lot of good ones)

Some of these good include Federer whipping away a BH inside-out winner (he very rarely plays this shot - Djoko plays it often and hits 2 of his own - 1 of them even better than Fed's), Djoko hitting an ultra sharply angled FH cc winner (a shot more likely to be seen from Federer), a FH cc pass from Djoko on the stretch after being slightly wrong footed, a picture perfect BH drop shot from Fed from behind the baseline

Its not just the winners that should make the highights package, build up and situation makes some of the plays memorably. Returning to stay in the set, Djoko chip-charges his way to net early in a rally to put away a BHV winner (a play he didn't use at all in the match, and rarely uses ever). He gains the break in that game after a Fed FH inside-out vs Djoko BH cc rally (Fed having the edge but not being able to finish the point) changes with Fed playing a less angled shot to Djoko's FH, which he pounds cc to force an error. A couple of beautifully constructed net points by Federer. And note Fed with 3 FH inside-in winners to 1 inside-out... not something you see everyday

Serve & Return
Good serving and good returning from both players - cancelling out, basically

Fed with the slightly better serve, cancelled out by Djoko serving at higher percentage (70% to 61%) and Djoko with slightly better return accounting for the rest

Djoko isn't particularly damaging with return in this one. The odd very deep return - and Fed's very good at half-volleying those off the baseline - but not many

Fed slices almost all his BHs. I suppose it works - high 78% return rate. Alternative was to come over the BH, which would make Djoko's first groundstroke a bit harder (unlikely to be too hard, seeing as Djoko's return wasn't too hard for Fed) at the cost of a few more return errors. More aggressive returning is a good idea when a player is coming out well behind in play. Here that wasn't the case

Fed chip-charges on first two points of game where Djoko serves to prolong the second set. He's up a break and playing nothing-to-lose tennis in the game (he hits a sublime BH drop shot winner from behind the baseline down 40-0 in the game also). Loses both point to forced volleying errors, the first a makeable though difficult wide FHV

Good stuff from both. In the context of the match, cancelling out and not a factor in result, but shouldn't be overlooked or denied credit
 

Waspsting

Hall of Fame
Play - Baseline
Action is classic, crosscourt based with longline change ups - with something extra. That extra something is an extra dose of moving-each-other around tennis. Its not out and out open court tennis where guys are running from side to side every point.... but a healthy dose of that to go along with the stock cc exchanges

Action can also be said to be close to (false) norm of Federer shot-making vs Djokovic consistency - with something extra. I say 'false' because that's how the match up is usually seen by commentators. Having recently stat-ted about 20 matches between the pair - ranging from 2006 to 2019 and covering multiple matches on all surface and conditions (indoor vs outdoor), I can tell you confidently... there is no norm for a Djokovic-Federer match

You can take Fed shot making vs Djoko consistency as a very rough and simplified starting point based on each players typical style - but in matches between the two, there's so much variance from match to match that your as likely as not to see something completely different from that 'norm'.

This match starts off along the lines of the 'norm'... as it goes along, the extra something is Djokovic joining in the shot-making stakes (usually not well). Djoko has 10 winner attempt UEs (he only has 11 winners), Fed has 9 (and 20 winners)

On the other consistency side of things, results are more in line with what one might expect - Djoko 12 neutral UEs (out of 28) and Fed with 20 (out of 39)

Putting the two together... it looks like the match is so close due to Djoko being adventurous - and failing at it (neither are overly common) along with Fed being inconsistent of regular shots (not uncommon, and probably what you'd expect going up against Djokovic on a slow court)

On the consistency front, Fed doesn't play badly. Rallies have to go for quite a bit before he gives up UEs. Of shot making. Its just that Djoko plays better in that area

On the shot making front, Djoko I think does play a bit badly... some of his shot choices are odd, more characteristic of his opponent than him. And on occasion when he goes this route, he's usually more successful

Note the bulk of Fed's UEs being FHs (24, to 15 BH). That's not uncommon either... and actually a good sign for him. When he's making more BH errors, he's usually toothless. In matches like this though, making a lot of FH UEs tend to go with the also forcing a lot of points to an end with his strong side. That's what happens here - along with the 9 winners, the bulk of Djoko's 23 FEs come out of the Federer FH, though not as much as is often the case. Fed's BH is pretty sharp offensively too - good dtls and good court opening angles, while reasonably steady... more steady than Djoko's in fact, who has 18 BH UEs.

Djoko has a small advantage in defence. There's a fair amount of running each other around. I don't see much difference in court coverage - but Djoko excels in an area in which he has no equals. The authority with which he hits balls from defensive positions, stunning. He can hit balls that were strong enough to force an error strongly enough to force errors. Fed does well defensively (a little less well than Djoko), but can't counter-attack like this

Forced errors - dead even 23 apiece

Net Play
Fed's very good up front, constructing approaches well and volleying nicely. Djoko barely comes in - but there is that very out of character (and virtually perfect), chip-charge to net followed by a nice BHV winner. A tiny part of his more-aggressive approach in the match - that one comes off

I suppose the only approach that ends up mattering is the last. Its a great play by Fed.... just a freakishly good (and timely) reply by Djokovic. One of the best match points you'll see. Speaking of freakish....

Strong Parallel with Wimbledon 2019
7 years later, Djokovic would break Federer, who was serving for the match, from 40-15 down with 4 straight points in the Wimbledon final
Here, he breaks Federer, who was serving for the second set, from 40-15 down with 4 straight points

Point 5 at Wimbledon - Djoko makes deep return, Fed moves around it to go for winner FH inside-out and misses
Point 5 here - Djokovic returns strong serve deeply but with no great power, Fed moves around and goes for winner FH inside-out and misses

Point 8 Wimbledon - short rally, Fed nets a FH he had to move to slightly
Point 6 here - short rally, Fed nets a FH he had to move to slightly

Point 6 Wimbledon - Fed comes in early (attacks), Djoko counters with FH cc pass winner
Point 8 here - Fed attacking in rally, Djoko counters with a FH cc that forces a Fed FH error

(the remaining point is dissimilar. Wimbledon point 7 resembles WTF point 8 slightly though -

Point 7 at Wimbledon - neutral rally, Djoko overpowers and pushes Fed back, forcing a FH error
Point 7 here - Fed misses routine 3rd ball FH)
------

Summing up, tough, high quality match from both men. Just a few points in in - Djoko coming up with the goods on those points
 
Having watched the match a couple weeks ago - high quality? For a general standard, yes it has to be, but considering what both are capable of, that was quite a mugfest. Way too many stoopeed errors by either, exacerbated by some daft shot selection from Noel as you noticed but he picked himself up just in time in both sets. Fred's bouts of FH errors stood out as particularly disgusting to my fedfan self.
 

beard

Professional
I like your stats...

Another close match in statistical data, another win for mental giant...
 

ForehandRF

Professional
Having watched the match a couple weeks ago - high quality? For a general standard, yes it has to be, but considering what both are capable of, that was quite a mugfest. Way too many stoopeed errors by either, exacerbated by some daft shot selection from Noel as you noticed but he picked himself up just in time in both sets. Fred's bouts of FH errors stood out as particularly disgusting to my fedfan self.
That loss stinks, unlike the one in 2015.Had Fed won it, it would have been a good ending of a good season.
 

Waspsting

Hall of Fame
Novak Djokovic beat Roger Federer 6-4, 6-7(2), 6-2 in the Year End Championship (World Tour Finals) round robins, 2013 on indoor hard court in London England

Djokovic was the defending champion and would go onto beat Rafael Nadal in the final. Federer would go onto lose to Nadal in the semis

Djokovic won 106 points, Federer 98

Serve Stats
Djokovic...
- 1st serve percentage (57/101) 56%
- 1st serve points won (41/57) 72%
- 2nd serve points won (22/44) 50%
- Aces 9, Service Winners 1
- Double Faults 2
- Unreturned Serve Percentage (28/94) 30%

Federer...
- 1st serve percentage (55/103) 53%
- 1st serve points won (37/55) 67%
- 2nd serve points won (23/48) 48%
- Aces 5
- Double Faults 5
- Unreturned Serve Percentage (25/103) 24%

Serve Pattern
Djokovic served...
- to FH 31%
- to BH 66%
- to Body 3%

Federer served...
- to FH 34%
- to BH 60%
- to Body 6%

Return Stats
Djokovic made...
- 73 (23 FH, 50 BH), including 1 return-approach
- 2 Winners (2 BH)
- 20 Errors, comprising...
- 3 Unforced (3 BH)
- 17 Forced (7 FH, 10 BH)
- Return Rate (73/98) 74%

Federer made...
- 71 (24 FH, 47 BH), including 3 runaround FHs, 5 return-approaches & 2 drop shots
- 1 Winner (1 FH), a runaround FH
- 18 Errors, comprising...
- 6 Unforced (3 FH, 3 BH), including 1 runaround FH
- 12 Forced (6 FH, 6 BH)
- Return Rate (71/99) 72%

Break Points
Djokovic 5/11 (6 games)
Federer 2/5 (5 games)

Winners (including returns, excluding aces)
Djokovic 17 (7 FH, 8 BH, 1 BHV, 1 OH)
Federer 21 (8 FH, 3 BH, 5 FHV, 2 BHV, 3 OH)

Djokovic's FHs - 4 cc (1 pass), 1 dtl, 1 inside-out and 1 net-to-net
- BHs - 4 cc passes, 2 dtl (1 pass, 1 return), 1 inside-in return and 1 drop shot at net

- the BHV was a lob

Federer's FHs - 2 cc passes, 2 dtl, 2 inside-out, 1 inside-in runaround return and 1 drop shot
- BHs - 1 cc and 2 dtl

- 3 FHVs were swinging shots and 1 BHV was a drop
- 1 OH was a 'dunk' first volley off a serve-volley point and another came from a return-approach point

Errors (excluding returns and serves)
Djokovic 50
- 30 Unforced (14 FH, 16 BH)
- 20 Forced (8 FH, 9 BH, 1 BHV, 2 Challenges)
Unforced Error Forcefulness Index 46

Federer 56
- 36 Unforced (20 FH, 16 BH)
- 20 Forced (14 FH, 4 BH, 2 BHV)
Unforced Error Forcefulness Index 47.8

(Note 0: Djokovic made two incorrect challenges from strongly defensive positions. These have been counted as forced errors for him)

Net Points & Serve-Volley
Djokovic was...
- 9/16 (56%) at net, with...
- 1/1 return-approaching
- 0/1 forced back

Federer was...
- 18/27 (67%) at net, including...
- 2/2 serve-volleying, both 1st serves
--
- 3/5 (60%) return-approaching

Match Report
A very interesting encounter - effectively three matches in one -

First set - Federer is aggressive and proactive, Djokovic is rock solid. 1 bad service game separates the two - and play is generally of high quality
Second set - Federer is attacking, Djokovic appears rattled. A topsy turvy set, quality of play not particularly good but high on drama and ups and downs, with Federer the better player
Third set - Both players play normally. Federer plays poorly, Djoko goes back to rock solid and crushes him

First Set
Federer comes out with that twinkly quality to his footwork that's symptomatic of his best play. The attack he launches is well balanced one - not the crazy, low percentage stuff he's sometimes moved to try. Occasional trips to the net supplement attacking FHs and he's the proactive force in play

Djokovic is steady and reactive. Solid, strong in defence in equal measure of both sides

Play goes on serve comfortably til game 9, when Federer has the first break point, largely due to 2 Djokovic doubles. But there's a sensational point too. Federer hits a drop shot chip-charge return. Its possibly an accident, but I don't think so. Djoko slips as he starts to move forward to deal with the return, but ultimately reaches net where his attempt at a lob sails long. On break point, Fed misses a FH inside-in/crosscourt winner attempt. Though adventurous, the ball was there for the shot though a touch beyond the aggression level Fed had shown. Djoko goes on to hold

Next game, Djoko breaks to take the set in an over-aggressive game from Fed. 4 FH UEs - 3 winner attempts and an attacking shot - and too much running around the BH too early by the Swiss. This would be an example of going beyond attacking and into low-percentage aggression (read: crazy) play. Looks great when it comes off. It rarely comes off

Some good shots in the set. For Fed, a lashing FH dtl winner and a BH dtl winner set up with a slow first serve are the pick (other than the highly creative drop shot/chip-charge return). For Djoko, a pair of BH passes - a dtl nearly as good as the match point from previous years final and a guided cc against a good, deep return

A problem for Federer is the frailty of his BH. It tends to yield routine errors. Generally and in this match also, more so when he's looking to attack than otherwise. A spot Djoko could look to play the ball safely to

Second Set
Djoko goes haywire on errors. First set, he had 4 UEs (2 FH, 2 BH). In second, he has 21 (12 FH, 9 BH). To compare, Fed had 11 in first set and 17 in second

There are 3 consecutive breaks in middle of set. Fed coming from 40-0 down to break in a 10 point game, highlighted by a BH dtl winner by the Swiss to end a point he'd been on the defensive on. Djoko breaks back at once in a 12 point game, with Fed double faulting twice, including on break point. Then Djoko having a horror game to be broken to love - 3 very different types of BH UEs (a mishit in short rally, a routine ball in a longer rally and a third ball cc winner attempt to open court), followed by a Fed passing winner that flicked the net chord on its way over

Fed fails to serve out the set though in a game where he again overdoes the runaround FHs and Djoko strikes an unlikely FH passing winner on the run and stretch, but dominates the tiebreak to push the match into decider

It seems as if Djoko got a bit rattled by Fed's attacking play. The twinkly footwork thing had died down by the second set, but Fed was still on the look out for attacking shots. Djoko increased his own aggression a bit. He tried turning the tables on Federer by hitting FH inside-outs to Fed's BH (usually, its the other way round). While Fed's BH didn't look able to cope and gave away a few UEs, Djoko also couldn't execute the play well and made UEs himself trying. Besides that, just plain bad play from Djok, missing routine balls

Thrilling and more open court than first set, but with an element of who-plays-less-badly about it

Third Set
Djoko returns to rock solid from point 1, as he breaks Fed to love to open the set. Fed drops the attacking play and plays normally (by his standard, a touch passively). Djoko also turns up the heat on serve - 7/9 of his aces come in this set and he wins 18/20 first serve points (and just 1/7 second serve ones)

Fed has a point to break back next game, snuffed out with a strong body serve. In this game, Fed executes his second drop shot/return approach of the match. Unlike the previous one, this one is drop shot first and then approach...I think it was an accident. Whatever, the case, he wins the point but after this game, can make no further inroads on return. Djoko adds a second break for good measure

Serve & Return
Couple interesting experiments by Fed. He delivers a couple of slow first serves. Not a bad change up against a grooved returner like Djokovic

On return, a few times Fed falls back as he makes the second shot, giving himself more time to see the ball and put it in play. Makes more sense than stepping inside the court and chipping the ball as he tends to

Few good chip charge returns. the drop shot combined with chip charge return is a sight

Djoko bangs down back to back BH return winners against second serves when he's up 2 breaks and down 40-0 in the game. Scary to think that as well as he returns, he actually holds back a little

Play - Baseline & Net
Some points of interest -

-the frailty of Fed's BH. Just misses routine ones fairly often. Still, Djoko has just as many BH UEs - 16 apiece but that looks more like a bad day than a bad BH

Shots on the move is an area strongly favouring Djoko. both players run each other around, but Djoko's quite likely to come up with a winning shot from that position while Fed's more likely to be forced into an error. Fed's usually moving to his right (i.e. hitting running FHs) because he's cooped over on the BH side of the court to protect that wing

This is another problem for him. When he can outhit someone, its fine to sacrifice court position for it but against Djoko standing in the center, Fed's slanted to BH positioning puts him at a disadvantage right from the get go. Djoko can still find his BH if he needs, or more often, Fed crams himself still more to the BH side to hit the FH. In this match, it seems he's doing it more to protect his BH rather than to be offensive with the FH... that's a losing a game plan. And his inside-out attacks from there to the Djoko BH aren't strong enough to regularly win points anyway

Fed shows good net instincts in when to come in but could probably do a bit more of it. The situation from his point of view seems to be that he can't take Djoko from the baseline, other than by attacking to a degree that isn't sustainable. Or unless Djoko plays badly, as happened in the second set... but that's not something one would want to count on. What other options does that leave him other than coming forward more?

Summing up, a multi-dimensional match with an excellent attack vs solid first set. Rest of the match is pretty ordinary of quality (save Djoko's serving in the third), with lots of errors and loose play from both but thrillingly so
 
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Drob

Professional
Novak Djokovic beat Roger Federer 7-6(5), 7-5 in the Year End Championship (World Tour Finals) final, 2012 on indoor hard court in London England

It was Djokovic's 2nd title at the event and first of a record 4 in a year. The two players had been locked in a battle for year end number 1, with Federer regaining the top spot briefly after winning Wimbledon (beating Djokovic in the semi-final). Djokovic ended up comfortably claiming the top spot

Djokovic won 96 points, Federer 95

Serve Stats
Djokovic...
- 1st serve percentage (69/98) 70%
- 1st serve points won (43/69) 62%
- 2nd serve points won (14/29) 48%
- Aces 6, Service Winners 1
- Double Faults 2
- Unreturned Serve Percentage (21/98) 21%

Federer...
- 1st serve percentage (57/93) 61%
- 1st serve points won (35/57) 61%
- 2nd serve points won (19/36) 53%
- Aces 8
- Double Faults 2
- Unreturned Serve Percentage (22/93) 24%

Serve Pattern
Djokovic served...
- to FH 35%
- to BH 63%
- to Body 2%

Federer served...
- to FH 35%
- to BH 58%
- to Body 7%

Return Stats
Djokovic made...
- 69 (25 FH, 44 BH), including 1 runaround FH
- 14 Errors, comprising...
- 1 Unforced (1 FH)
- 13 Forced (6 FH, 7 BH)
- Return Rate (69/91) 76%

Federer made...
- 75 (29 FH, 46 BH), including 1 runaround FH & 2 return-approaches
- 14 Errors, comprising...
- 3 Unforced (1 FH, 2 BH)
- 11 Forced (4 FH, 7 BH)
- Return Rate (75/96) 78%

Break Points
Djokovic 4/7 (5 games)
Federer 3/7 (4 games)

Winners (including returns, excluding aces)
Djokovic 11 (7 FH, 3 BH, 1 BHV)
Federer 20 (9 FH, 4 BH, 5 FHV, 1 BHV, 1 OH)

Djokovic's FHs - 3 cc (1 pass and 1 touching serving line but not counted a net point), 1 dtl (hit from outside the court) and 3 inside-out (1 pass)
- BHs - 2 inside-out and 1 dtl pass

Federer's FHs - 4 cc (1 pass at net), 1 dtl pass, 1 inside-out and 3 inside-in (1 pass)
- BHs - 2 dtl, 1 inside-out and 1 drop shot

- 1 FHV was a swinging shot from behind service line but counted a net point and 1 was a drop

Errors (excluding returns and serves)
Djokovic 51
- 28 Unforced (10 FH, 18 BH)
- 23 Forced (10 FH, 12 BH, 1 BHV)
Unforced Error Forcefulness Index 49.3

Federer 62
- 39 Unforced (24 FH, 15 BH)
- 23 Forced (13 FH, 8 BH, 1 FHV, 1 BHV)
Unforced Error Forcefulness Index 47.2

(Note 1: all half-volleys refer to such shots played at net. Half -volleys played from other parts of the court are included within relevant groundstroke counts)

(Note 2: The 'Unforced Error Forcefulness Index is a measure of how aggressive of intent the average UE made was. 60 is maximum, 20 is minimum. This match has been scored using a four point scale - 2 defensive, 4 neutral, 5 attacking, 6 winner attempt)

Net Points & Serve-Volley
Djokovic was...
- 4/10 (40%) at net

Federer was...
- 12/17 (71%) at net, with...
- 0/2 return-approaching

Match Report
A very good match and about as even as even can be. Have a look at -

- Points - Djokovic 96, Federer 95
- Unreturned serves - Djokovic 21, Federer 22
- Break points - Djokovic 4/7, Federer 3/7
- Points in rallies - Djokovic 73, Federer 71

Winners to Unforced Errors ratio is on the high side - as it should be in such conditions. When it isn't, its a sign of either an time great performance/match and/or one player being exceptionally badly in defence

Court is slow-ish and near perfect for encouraging all court tennis. Good serving is rewarded but returns can be made for rallies to go on, good returning is rewarded (somewhat less), shot making is rewarded but not decisively so, consistency of shot is important. The last mentioned would probably be key to the match in these conditions and Djokovic has the advantage in that area (28 UEs to 39 for Fed), but its a few-key-points and could-have-gone-either-way match. And Djoko steps to the plate better in those moments

Djoko starts slow and Federer fast - and the latter wins 12 of the first 13 points to start the match. And starts game 4 with a stunning FH cc winner, but Djoko struggles through to hold a 10 point game, finishing with a brilliant winner of his own, FH dtl from outside the court. And breaks back next game to restore parity - errors from his opponent being the main cause

Rest of the set is tough. Server has the advantage (as he should) but the returner has chances (as is optimal for a good match). Djoko breaks in a gritty, 18 point game to leave himself serving for the set. Federer though breaks back, as Djoko makes a pair of premature winner attempt errors to open the door. On a key point, Fed wins a who-blinks-first BH-BH rally

Djoko cuts himself badly diving in the next game. A nasty gash that I'd think would affect his play, though it doesn't appear to

Tie-break is a first class one. Fed loses the first service point, blinking with a BH error in a long rally but gains the mini-break back a couple of points later with a sublime BH dtl winner. Tough stuff from there - errors forced and unforced, usually in good rallies, but the end comes with a bad point from Fed and a great one from Djoko.

Down set point, Fed takes the net, makes a difficult first volley on the stretch. Djo runs up to meet it and place it wide, but Fed, half-retreating, is able to swivel around and dispatch a FH cc winner from just inside the serve line. A sensational point, but Fed mucks it up badly on the next. He goes for a peculiarly aggressive BH dtl/inside-out shot off the third ball and misses by a long way.... its rare for Fed to play an attacking BH third ball at best of times and he usually does when the shot is the obvious one and the court is open. Here though, it was just a routine position where he trys to make the play out of nothing... it would have been ambitious (and far from certain, probably less than 50-50) if he could makes such a shot off the FH... plenty of attacking errors from Fed in the match (10 attacking and 9 winner attempts to be precise), but this one stands out for poor shot choice and of course, the timing.

Djoko does wrap up with a superb point, drawing a not strong return, backing away all the way to the BH side to whisk away an perfect FH inside-out winner. The kind of shot even Federer would be proud of, and the kind of play Djoko tends to eschew.

Federer breaks to start the second set, an 18 point game ending with 3 Djoko UEs - 2 of them winner attempts. Match continues with not easy holds - each player surviving a break point and some longer games - but on serve til Fed steps up to serve for the set and 5-4

What happens next is uncannily similar to what would happen in the Wimbledon final this year. Not just of scoreline but even on a play-by-play level. Freaky, for now, Fed loses 4 points in a row from 40-15 up to get broken

And is broken again next chance to lose the match. Match point is sensational. Fed collars the point, starting with a strong serve and sweeps a FH inside-out (a shot he doesn't use much in the match) into the corner as he takes the net. He'd won 12/16 next points to this point, but all that matters is after it, its 12/17. Djokovic scamper over to reach the ball and while sliding and half-doing the splits pushes it perfectly BH dtl for the pass - magnificent, probably the shot of the match (and there are a lot of good ones)

Some of these good include Federer whipping away a BH inside-out winner (he very rarely plays this shot - Djoko plays it often and hits 2 of his own - 1 of them even better than Fed's), Djoko hitting an ultra sharply angled FH cc winner (a shot more likely to be seen from Federer), a FH cc pass from Djoko on the stretch after being slightly wrong footed, a picture perfect BH drop shot from Fed from behind the baseline

Its not just the winners that should make the highights package, build up and situation makes some of the plays memorably. Returning to stay in the set, Djoko chip-charges his way to net early in a rally to put away a BHV winner (a play he didn't use at all in the match, and rarely uses ever). He gains the break in that game after a Fed FH inside-out vs Djoko BH cc rally (Fed having the edge but not being able to finish the point) changes with Fed playing a less angled shot to Djoko's FH, which he pounds cc to force an error. A couple of beautifully constructed net points by Federer. And note Fed with 3 FH inside-in winners to 1 inside-out... not something you see everyday

Serve & Return
Good serving and good returning from both players - cancelling out, basically

Fed with the slightly better serve, cancelled out by Djoko serving at higher percentage (70% to 61%) and Djoko with slightly better return accounting for the rest

Djoko isn't particularly damaging with return in this one. The odd very deep return - and Fed's very good at half-volleying those off the baseline - but not many

Fed slices almost all his BHs. I suppose it works - high 78% return rate. Alternative was to come over the BH, which would make Djoko's first groundstroke a bit harder (unlikely to be too hard, seeing as Djoko's return wasn't too hard for Fed) at the cost of a few more return errors. More aggressive returning is a good idea when a player is coming out well behind in play. Here that wasn't the case

Fed chip-charges on first two points of game where Djoko serves to prolong the second set. He's up a break and playing nothing-to-lose tennis in the game (he hits a sublime BH drop shot winner from behind the baseline down 40-0 in the game also). Loses both point to forced volleying errors, the first a makeable though difficult wide FHV

Good stuff from both. In the context of the match, cancelling out and not a factor in result, but shouldn't be overlooked or denied credit

Been meaning to watch it. Court was slow-ish, you said? Thanks
 
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