Etiquette for Recording Matches

spot

Hall of Fame
I say yes. If the person not wanting to be recorded refused to play while being recorded, I believe he or she would be backed by the league in that position
Oh... maybe this is where we disagree. I can't imagine that the league would back someone who refused to play because someone was video taping the match. I think the league would tell them that the person literally has every right to video tape the match unless the facility prohibited it.

And should a parent have veto power over some creeper that wants to tape young kids playing on public courts?
But the situation we are talking about would be whether one parent has the ability to veto another parent videotaping their own child play. OF course one parent should not be able to do so because videotaping your own child is very reasonable behavior.

Expand on this further. LEts say that someone wanted to record their son's soccer game. Should they get permission from the parents of the other 21 children before "basic human decency" would let them do so? Personally I would go ahead and film because to me that is very reasonable behavior and if someone were to object to it I would listen to them and decide whether their objection were reasonable or not.
 
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OrangePower

Legend
I say yes. If the person not wanting to be recorded refused to play while being recorded, I believe he or she would be backed by the league in that position. That person is obviously overreacting, but, for the sake of harmony, I would just decide not to record them and just try to get done with the match and off the court as soon as possible.

And should a parent have veto power over some creeper that wants to tape young kids playing on public courts?

Again, this all goes back to the "service return bunting" thread. Virtually the same people seem to be more concerned with harmony (i.e. getting people's permission before filming them, hitting out serves before they reach adjacent courts) while the same others take adversarial positions (i.e. the "I'm going to record what I want to record, regardless of what my opponent feels", "go strictly by the Code because my opponent might accuse me of gamesmanship.")

Shocking how down party lines we are on these two issues.
Ha! I am a proud independent / libertarian!

I think it is inappropriate and borderline rude to film people without their knowledge / consent.

I think bunting out serves is actually counterproductive to the harmony of the game (vs receiver controlling ball and putting in his / her pocket), and so think the Code got it right on that one.
 

North

Professional
OK. Lets look at an example that came up recently. Lets say it is a league match that has gotten very contentious on line calls. One person goes to their back and sets up a camera in an non-intrusive place to record the rest of the match. Do you really think that the other person should have veto power over this?
Nope. That is a very rational and prudent reason to record the match. IMO.
 

tennis_ocd

Hall of Fame
The facility is absolutely allowed to ban the recording of matches.
True. And it's the property owner call; not individual participants.

Football, soccer, baseball, softball, wrestling, nobody blinks or thinks twice. Why is tennis supposed to be different? I can't remotely think of how simple recording of a match for later private viewing would be considered rude.

Uploading publicly? Perhaps so.
 

Cindysphinx

G.O.A.T.
True. And it's the property owner call; not individual participants.

Football, soccer, baseball, softball, wrestling, nobody blinks or thinks twice. Why is tennis supposed to be different? I can't remotely think of how simple recording of a match for later private viewing would be considered rude.

Uploading publicly? Perhaps so.
That's the weird thing.

Do any of you folks have children? If you go to any group performance or sporting event, the place is chock-a-block with people taking photos and video. Half of the people are taking pics, and the other half are kicking themselves because they forgot their camera.

Do you really think those who are taking video have it zoomed so they do not see another participant besides their relative? Do you think they need to ask the permission of anyone else they might film? Do you think they won't upload it to YouTube or post stuff on Facebook?

If I looked up and saw someone filming one of my tennis matches, I would go over immediately and beg them to send me a copy.
 

Turbo-87

Legend
That's the weird thing.

Do any of you folks have children? If you go to any group performance or sporting event, the place is chock-a-block with people taking photos and video. Half of the people are taking pics, and the other half are kicking themselves because they forgot their camera.

Do you really think those who are taking video have it zoomed so they do not see another participant besides their relative? Do you think they need to ask the permission of anyone else they might film? Do you think they won't upload it to YouTube or post stuff on Facebook?

If I looked up and saw someone filming one of my tennis matches, I would go over immediately and beg them to send me a copy.
I still think that group/team sporting events are different. Of course you may be caught on camera at random times. In the case of a tennis match, depending on the camera placement, you could become one of the focal points for the duration of the recording. Some people would just have an aversion to being recorded. There are plenty of people who wouldn't want to be recorded in this setting because you just don't know where it will end up. I know it isn't a sex tape. :)

I am making too much of this, I know. Just stating an opinion.
 
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jmnk

Hall of Fame
I still think that group/team sporting events are different. Of course you may be caught on camera at random times. In the case of a tennis match, depending on the camera placement, you could become one of the focal points for the duration of the recording. Some people would just have an aversion to being recorded. There are plenty of people who wouldn't want to be recorded in this setting because you just don't know where it will end up. I know it isn't a sex tape. :)

I am making too much of this, I know. Just stating an opinion.
ok, so where's the line. Is doubles a 'team sporting event' and therefore OK to videotape? If not - how about a clinic with five people - is that 'team' enough?
 

tenniscasey

Semi-Pro
If someone videotapes a common-person tennis match without asking all participants if they mind, they're simply weird. Not evil, just kinda "off."

That said, I play on public courts often, and my social matches have been photo'd and filmed by random people. Goes with the territory.
 

North

Professional
I still think that group/team sporting events are different. Of course you may be caught on camera at random times. In the case of a tennis match, depending on the camera placement, you could become one of the focal points for the duration of the recording. Some people would just have an aversion to being recorded. There are plenty of people who wouldn't want to be recorded in this setting because you just don't know where it will end up. I know it isn't a sex tape. :)
I don't think most people would worry about winding up on a sex tape. I think many people would be slightly disconcerted (or perhaps even outright mortified lol) to see either their tennis or their behaviour on film, especially since the film is fair game for youtube.

I couldn't care less if someone is filming and I do think it is very legitimate to film to help your own game to improve or because, as another poster alluded to, the match has become contentious.
 
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spot

Hall of Fame
Some people would just have an aversion to being recorded.
And that is a personal quirk that they would be OK being recorded during a team sport but not in tennis. If someone is doing something reasonable then I think it should be up to them to ask for that personal quirk to be accommodated.

Once again. Lets say that a mother wishes to film her son playing their first mixed doubles match. Do you really think that they need to get the permission of the other 3 parents in order to do so? Should 1 parent be able to veto them?
 

OrangePower

Legend
OK. Lets look at an example that came up recently. Lets say it is a league match that has gotten very contentious on line calls. One person goes to their back and sets up a camera in an non-intrusive place to record the rest of the match. Do you really think that the other person should have veto power over this?
I couldn't care less if someone is filming and I do think it is very legitimate to film to help your own game to improve or because, as another poster alluded to, the match has become contentious.
Out of interest - how would you imagine making use of a recording in the situation where line calls have become contentious?

I don't think the recording would be a useful tool during the match itself - would take too long to find and analyze a particular shot / call, and even then I doubt it would be conclusive in most cases.

You could of course review it after the match, but then what? Even if there is conclusive evidence of some bad calls, it doesn't demonstrate intent. And even if it was so often and obvious that intent to hook could be deduced, then what? The match is over and done with. I guess the recording could be sent to the offender's captain, or to the league, but I doubt it would lead to anything positive. If anything, the recorder could come off as quite obsessive and petty.

So if that's the reason for recording, it just seems like a lot of effort for no real useful purpose, and on the other hand, potential for lots of ugliness.
 

spot

Hall of Fame
So if that's the reason for recording, it just seems like a lot of effort for no real useful purpose, and on the other hand, potential for lots of ugliness.
I think that the implication would be that it would be there to send to a coordinator if there were verbal abuse or truly egregious line calls. (Serve in the middle of the box called out as a makeup)

If a match had already gotten to the point of being very contentious with lots of arguments I do think that a camera rolling would likely keep things from escalating. Its one thing to yell at the other team about a line call. Its another to do so knowing that the tape may be sent to the coordinator.

I guess I don't see where the "lots of effort" would come in. Set the camera up. Push record.

Once again I wouldn't personally do this but if someone wanted to I think they absolutely should be allowed to and I have witnessed many matches where I do think it would have helped a great deal.
 

Brian11785

Hall of Fame
I think that the implication would be that it would be there to send to a coordinator if there were verbal abuse or truly egregious line calls. (Serve in the middle of the box called out as a makeup)

If a match had already gotten to the point of being very contentious with lots of arguments I do think that a camera rolling would likely keep things from escalating. Its one thing to yell at the other team about a line call. Its another to do so knowing that the tape may be sent to the coordinator.

I guess I don't see where the "lots of effort" would come in. Set the camera up. Push record.

Once again I wouldn't personally do this but if someone wanted to I think they absolutely should be allowed to and I have witnessed many matches where I do think it would have helped a great deal.
Man, I would hate tennis if I had to deal with all of the conflict that some of you guys apparently do.
 

OrangePower

Legend
I think that the implication would be that it would be there to send to a coordinator if there were verbal abuse or truly egregious line calls. (Serve in the middle of the box called out as a makeup)

If a match had already gotten to the point of being very contentious with lots of arguments I do think that a camera rolling would likely keep things from escalating. Its one thing to yell at the other team about a line call. Its another to do so knowing that the tape may be sent to the coordinator.

I guess I don't see where the "lots of effort" would come in. Set the camera up. Push record.

Once again I wouldn't personally do this but if someone wanted to I think they absolutely should be allowed to and I have witnessed many matches where I do think it would have helped a great deal.
The lots of effort I was thinking of was not setting up the recording, but going through it all afterwards to identify potential bad lines calls etc.

I mean I understand what you're saying about it possibly deterring bad behavior and all, but it just seems like so much overkill for a rec tennis match.
 

spot

Hall of Fame
The lots of effort I was thinking of was not setting up the recording, but going through it all afterwards to identify potential bad lines calls etc.

I mean I understand what you're saying about it possibly deterring bad behavior and all, but it just seems like so much overkill for a rec tennis match.
Oh- I agree. I haven't done it. I haven't thought about doing it. I even have a little sport camera in my bag and a tripod for helping people with their strokes.

I am simply saying I think that someone should have the ability to do this if they want to. That a reasonable person could think that it would help in different situations that I have witnessed.
 

North

Professional
I think that the implication would be that it would be there to send to a coordinator if there were verbal abuse or truly egregious line calls. (Serve in the middle of the box called out as a makeup)

If a match had already gotten to the point of being very contentious with lots of arguments I do think that a camera rolling would likely keep things from escalating. Its one thing to yell at the other team about a line call. Its another to do so knowing that the tape may be sent to the coordinator.

I guess I don't see where the "lots of effort" would come in. Set the camera up. Push record.

Once again I wouldn't personally do this but if someone wanted to I think they absolutely should be allowed to and I have witnessed many matches where I do think it would have helped a great deal.
I have seen matches filmed twice at 2 different tournaments (though not by me). Both times it made a difference.

First time, someone from the club was supposed to be filming certain matches but actually filmed a wrong match lol. As it turned out - in that filmed match, one player (who lost - I think it was close, but am not sure on that) felt he was getting hooked a lot and kept getting an official but the official wouldn't stay around more than a couple of points (she kept going outside to smoke :roll:). The player complained to the TD about the poor line calls and the official not sticking around. The club cameraman apparently noticed all this when he was filming and showed the film to the TD. I got to watch some of it.

The poor line calls were pretty egregious and it was clear the official should have stuck around for pretty much the whole match. The player who got hooked had refused to shake hands on the grounds that the match was not over because he was going to complain to the TD - that is the ugliness Orange Power was referring to - and it did get ugly. But... I gotta hand it to the TD. He DQd the guy who made all the terrible line calls and the wayward official was more conscientious after that. So maybe the brief ugliness was worth it.

The other time I saw it was what spot referred to - as soon as the camera started rolling (by a family member of a player) the gamesmanship and bad calls magically got better.

Too bad the default is not just to film everything in leagues, tourneys - you really do forget about the camera, it helps a lot to see yourself play, and it does seem to make the jerks behave better.
 
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jmnk

Hall of Fame
I have seen matches filmed twice at 2 different tournaments (though not by me). Both times it made a difference.

First time, someone from the club was supposed to be filming certain matches but actually filmed a wrong match lol. As it turned out - in that filmed match, one player (who lost - I think it was close, but am not sure on that) felt he was getting hooked a lot and kept getting an official but the official wouldn't stay around more than a couple of points (she kept going outside to smoke :roll:). The player complained to the TD about the poor line calls and the official not sticking around. The club cameraman apparently noticed all this when he was filming and showed the film to the TD. I got to watch some of it.

The poor line calls were pretty egregious and it was clear the official should have stuck around for pretty much the whole match. The player who got hooked had refused to shake hands on the grounds that the match was not over because he was going to complain to the TD - that is the ugliness Orange Power was referring to - and it did get ugly. But... I gotta hand it to the TD. He DQd the guy who made all the terrible line calls and the wayward official was more conscientious after that. So maybe the brief ugliness was worth it.

The other time I saw it was what spot referred to - as soon as the camera started rolling (by a family member of a player) the gamesmanship and bad calls magically got better.

Too bad the default is not just to film everything in leagues, tourneys - you really do forget about the camera, it helps a lot to see yourself play, and it does seem to make the jerks behave better.
is that actually per rules? Can a director DQ a player based on some film he reviews after the match (but before handshake)? Even if the film does show extreme hooking?
 

floridatennisdude

Hall of Fame
Wow. Seriously? People are that objective to their opponent recording something?

Geez. My dad taped most of my junior events...tennis, basketball, soccer, football. It is common.

Only difference in an adult league match is that there are very few spectators. There is zero law against doing it and I challenge anyone to find one.

Again, if you do it you are not criminal. You are just odd. No law against being odd.
 

North

Professional
is that actually per rules? Can a director DQ a player based on some film he reviews after the match (but before handshake)? Even if the film does show extreme hooking?
I have no idea. I don't know how much latitude a TD has in terms of running a tournament. The TD was on the phone when I went down to play my match. Later we all heard some loud arguing - yikes.

I saw the DQ on the results sheet. Not sure what else may have happened when he talked to the players. It didn't exactly cast a pall over the rest of the tournament as the DQd player was not well-liked. Perhaps he already had complaints against him - but that is conjecture as I just don't know.
 

J_R_B

Hall of Fame
Wow. Seriously? People are that objective to their opponent recording something?

Geez. My dad taped most of my junior events...tennis, basketball, soccer, football. It is common.

Only difference in an adult league match is that there are very few spectators. There is zero law against doing it and I challenge anyone to find one.

Again, if you do it you are not criminal. You are just odd. No law against being odd.
As long as it's a public facility. Private facilities DO have the right to make their own rules regarding recording on their private property.
 

beernutz

Hall of Fame
Wow. Seriously? People are that objective to their opponent recording something?

Geez. My dad taped most of my junior events...tennis, basketball, soccer, football. It is common.

Only difference in an adult league match is that there are very few spectators. There is zero law against doing it and I challenge anyone to find one.

Again, if you do it you are not criminal. You are just odd. No law against being odd.
Actually there are many laws against audio recording without the consent of the person being recorded, including video recordings which are also recording audio. Since most camcorders record both audio and video you are subject to the audio recording laws making such recordings illegal in many states without consent. Google 'one party two party consent audio recordings' and you'll find ton of references on the subject.

As to whether someone is odd for recording, this is your dad we're talking about here remember? ;-) He was recording your opponents too wasn't he?
 

tenniscasey

Semi-Pro
Parents recording their kids' athletic events: Normal.

Parent recording his own athletic events: Weird.

Kid recording his own athletic events: Weird.

Kid recording his parents' athletic events: Weird.
 
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Turbo-87

Legend
Parents recording their kids' athletic events: Normal.

Parent recording his own athletic events: Weird.

Kid recording his own athletic events: Weird.
Heh. I kind of agree with you. One time I used my tablet to record my serve just to see how bad my form was. I had to look around to make sure no one was seeing me record it because it DID feel weird. :)
 

tennis_ocd

Hall of Fame
Actually there are many laws against audio recording without the consent of the person being recorded, including video recordings which are also recording audio. Since most camcorders record both audio and video you are subject to the audio recording laws making such recordings illegal in many states without consent. Google 'one party two party consent audio recordings' and you'll find ton of references on the subject.
Virtually all laws restricting audio recordings refer to private discussions. They would not be applicable to audio on a public tennis court.
 

floridatennisdude

Hall of Fame
Actually there are many laws against audio recording without the consent of the person being recorded, including video recordings which are also recording audio. Since most camcorders record both audio and video you are subject to the audio recording laws making such recordings illegal in many states without consent. Google 'one party two party consent audio recordings' and you'll find ton of references on the subject.

As to whether someone is odd for recording, this is your dad we're talking about here remember? ;-) He was recording your opponents too wasn't he?
The law comes to play over the use of the recording.

In a criminal or civil matter, it may be inadmittable if challenged by the unaware party.

And if a person uses a video for profit, parties may have a claim to the proceeds.

No one is going to jail. The only recordings that are seen as illegal are those where a person has an expectation of privacy (bathroom, changing room, hotel room, etc). Privacy expectations at a tennis court....not seeing it.
 

sundaypunch

Hall of Fame
It is a nuisance when people overeract to this. They are recording their player and not you. They want to achive their matches so they can become better players in the future. Posting a video named "My Opponent Sucks" online or something is considered slander but there are cases out there when it happens. Most of the times, the players who are videotaped are doing to achieve progess in their performance.

Goodness people...
My favorite is the person here in the junior forum that bashed someone for making bad calls against his kid. The "proof" video he posted showed conclusively that the calls were, in fact, good.
 

beernutz

Hall of Fame
The law comes to play over the use of the recording.

In a criminal or civil matter, it may be inadmittable if challenged by the unaware party.

And if a person uses a video for profit, parties may have a claim to the proceeds.

No one is going to jail. The only recordings that are seen as illegal are those where a person has an expectation of privacy (bathroom, changing room, hotel room, etc). Privacy expectations at a tennis court....not seeing it.
LOL, speculating much? I think the word you are looking for there is inadmissible but it is unclear what point you're trying to make.

You should really go look up some of the cases that have been tried in two party consent states.
 

spot

Hall of Fame
LOL, speculating much? I think the word you are looking for there is inadmissible but it is unclear what point you're trying to make.

You should really go look up some of the cases that have been tried in two party consent states.
Just out of curiosity what case did you read that made it sound like posting a youtube video of a tennis match when filming from the sidelines would possibly be illegal?
 

Overdrive

Legend
My favorite is the person here in the junior forum that bashed someone for making bad calls against his kid. The "proof" video he posted showed conclusively that the calls were, in fact, good.
There's always someone who does that. It didn't matter if he showed a video or not, the match is over and any 'calls' outside the court without a linesman doesn't matter anyways.

:)
 

beernutz

Hall of Fame
Just out of curiosity what case did you read that made it sound like posting a youtube video of a tennis match when filming from the sidelines would possibly be illegal?
Holy strawman Batman. Please go back and read the last couple of interactions between floridatennisdude and myself.
 

floridatennisdude

Hall of Fame
LOL, speculating much? I think the word you are looking for there is inadmissible but it is unclear what point you're trying to make.

You should really go look up some of the cases that have been tried in two party consent states.
Cases that involve one or two party consent are when they are conversations affecting a legal matter. It ain't a rec sports tape.

If youre so right, then why aren't a bunch of parents not suing other parents for taping their kids weekend soccer games?

You're being difficult to be difficult. This guy wants to watch himself play tennis to try to get better. He ain't trying to make a series of hidden camera shows. Big difference.

Go to YouTube and look around at tennis vids. By your theory, everyone the camera catches is a victim if they didn't sign a waiver? Please. 21st century here.

Pardon my spelling. Fat fingers + touchscreen w/ auto correct.
 

Cindysphinx

G.O.A.T.
My understanding is that the laws that apply to recording conversations without consent deal with *private* conversations and communications. Private, private, private.

That is why you can take a audio/video of your child's school choir concert without going to prison.
 

stapletonj

Hall of Fame
You are correct, Cindy

IT is only when you try to show other people the
audio/video of your child's school choir concert that you go to prison......

and well you should.........
 

TomT

Hall of Fame
At my last major zone tournament, I saw something I considered odd. This guy mounted a camera on the back net and recorded his match. My first reaction was, WTF?! If I was the other guy's opponent, I wouldn't want the match recorded. It might be embarrassing (The camera-man lost 6-1; 6-1). Now that I'm trying to maximize my limited time on the court, I'm thinking about doing just that...recording my matches.

Now my question to you is this...is it acceptable to record your matches?
Here are my thoughts on the subject:
1. It's mandatory that you get your opponent's permission to tape them.
2. It's only acceptable in casual matches (what about league matches?). Tournaments are out of the question (unless taped by a 3rd party not "on-court")
3. Only when it's not obstructive and doesn't interfere with the match in any way.

Does anyone else record their match play? Do you have any equipment you suggest or any tips you can offer? What are some of your experiences from this?
I've done it since returning to tennis in 2012. There are a couple of people in my local league who do it. I think it's strange that more people don't do it.

Of course I always ask my opponent if they have any objection, and offer to give them a copy of the raw video if they want one. Then I tell them that I will be editing the video to exclude everything but the relatively few shots and serves that I hit ok, and then posting it on my public YouTube tennis video channel (388mg) with no naming or reference to the opponent -- and that if they are opposed to that, then I will only post it as a private video.

I've never had anybody say no to being recorded while playing or to having the result posted on YouTube. Frankly, I don't think I'd want to have anything to do with anybody who did say no. If I ever do encounter such a person, then of course I won't record the match, but will probably never agree to play that person again.

Yes it is acceptable. I think you are greatly overthinking this.
Ditto.

I guess I just can't imagine who would possibly care about having their match videotaped. I guess part of it is that we regularly have a big group out to watch our matches so who cares if someone was there with a camera? Why would it not be acceptable in a league match or a tournament? I just don't get the point of view that says it is questionable behavior. If a softball team wanted to videotape the game no one would question it for a second. People video tape their kids all the time. Why on earth would anyone have a problem with it in tennis?
Double Ditto.

I'm one of those people (unless I'm doing the recording).
A bit of a one-sided attitude, but you seem to be coming around. :)

I wouldn't want someone to post me getting thrashed 6-0;6-0 to youtube or something like that.
Why not? It would be the truth wouldn't it? As it's said, the truth only hurts once. Maybe that's not quite correct, but it's not like you're getting recorded doing something wrong. It's a recreational tennis match for chrissakes. Lighten up. :)

On a side note, I find that I play worse the more people are watching.
I play better when I know people are watching. So can you. It's something that can be learned.

At my last tournament, they put me on center court. I lost the first set 4-6, won the second 6-0. After that a large crowd gathered to watch. I choked 1-6. I guess me being socially awkward makes me overly considerate of other people.
The only way to beat a fear, to turn a weakness into a strength, is to deal with it head on. I used to be sort of shy and awkward in various situations when I was much younger (public; strangers; girls, etc.). Now I'm outgoing (sometimes, possibly, almost to the point of being annoying :) ) and have been since my 20's, and I find that people respond quite positively to this.

I guess I should just buck it up, record my league matches and send my opponent the statistical review for their benefit as well.
That's the spirit! Buck the **** up! :) Post some of your vids here at Talk Tennis. I predict that you will be glad you did.
 
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pinky42

Rookie
At my last major zone tournament, I saw something I considered odd. This guy mounted a camera on the back net and recorded his match. My first reaction was, WTF?!
I can't speak to the reason the guy recorded the match but breaking down tape is a common training method. In fact, I think that rec players looking to improve should use it more often.

Now my question to you is this...is it acceptable to record your matches?
Yes, it is acceptable to record your matches. In general, a tennis match doesn't afford you any reasonable expectation of privacy, especially a tournament. As for etiquette, I would use the same guideline I would use when taking a picture. I wouldn't ask for permission if someone just happened to be in the frame, otherwise it would be nearly impossible to take some vacation photos. I would ask permission if I wanted to make someone the subject of a photo but that's just me. There are photographers who focus on slice of life pictures and they rely on the ability to take spontaneous pictures.

In terms of legality, you may record without consent as long as the subject(s) are in a setting where there is no reasonable expectation of privacy. For those that are curious, read the definition of "oral communication" in 18 USC 2510.2. That explains the types of communication that are covered by the law.

A common example given where you can record is when someone is speaking through a blowhorn. There's no way he can expect that his conversation is private. An example of when you can't record is when two people are in the middle of a field with nobody around. Even if it's a public space like a park it's reasonable for the two to believe that the conversation is private.

As a rule of thumb, if you are talking and random people can hear you without making any effort to listen in, then you probably don't have a reasonable expectation of privacy in that situation.
 

SpitFire

New User
Just so everyone knows, I ended up taking your advice and recorded my first 4.0 Ultimate Tennis league match. I won against the #2 USTA ranked singles player in 3.5 in my region. I won 7-5; 4-6;6-0. I emailed my opponent a link to the raw footage along with the same report I generated for myself. He was impressed and thankful.

After the first set, he switched into a mode I've never seen before. He started slicing everything. Total 180 from his previous gameplay. Anyways, it took some time to adjust, but once I did...it wasn't much of a problem after that.

I used an app to get a statistical analysis of the match, and can say that my first serve, though powerful enough to win most posts when in, needs to be more consistent (49%). I hit way too many UFE's on the backhand and my net-game needs work. Additionally, my camera positioning and battery management needs work too. :razz: I only got 3/4 of the court in the shot, and the battery died the first game into the 3rd set. I'm sure my service stats would have gone up if I could have logged those as well.

Anyways, I've got a few ideas about camera mounting and battery life. I'll keep it going as long as my opponents are cool with it.
 

TomT

Hall of Fame
Just so everyone knows, I ended up taking your advice and recorded my first 4.0 Ultimate Tennis league match. I won against the #2 USTA ranked singles player in 3.5 in my region. I won 7-5; 4-6;6-0. I emailed my opponent a link to the raw footage along with the same report I generated for myself. He was impressed and thankful.
Congratulations SpitFire.

After the first set, he switched into a mode I've never seen before. He started slicing everything. Total 180 from his previous gameplay. Anyways, it took some time to adjust, but once I did...it wasn't much of a problem after that.
Interesting. Nice going on adjusting and coming back strong in the 3rd set.

I used an app to get a statistical analysis of the match, and can say that my first serve, though powerful enough to win most posts when in, needs to be more consistent (49%). I hit way too many UFE's on the backhand and my net-game needs work.
From my limited experience so far, all rec players tend to be especially weak in these areas. Best wishes for improvement.

Additionally, my camera positioning and battery management needs work too. :razz: I only got 3/4 of the court in the shot, and the battery died the first game into the 3rd set. I'm sure my service stats would have gone up if I could have logged those as well.
Finding the best combination regarding all camera considerations takes a bit of trial and error. I assume you're using non-rechargable batteries. The best option is using Nimh rechargeables with higher than 2500mAh rating. And make sure they're not made in China if possible. But do some research on this before you buy, if you decide to try this option. For non-rechargeables, Lithium are the best, provided your camera is compatible with them. If not, then Ray-O-Vac alkaline (the extra or high energy ones) are the best.

What I do is turn off the recording during the rest period when changing ends. This way you can check the battery level each time, and there's little chance that the camera will shut off automatically, even if you've got it in a power saving mode.

As for camera mounting, the easiest option is a tripod extended to between 42 and 52 inches. This isn't so high that it requires an expensive heavy duty tripod, but it is high enough to get a great full court view from positioning in the middle and next to the back fence. The tripod option is also more resistant to camera movement problems than hanging it on the back fence if wind is an issue.

Anyways, I've got a few ideas about camera mounting and battery life. I'll keep it going as long as my opponents are cool with it.
Lets hear your ideas.

I doubt that you'll encounter anybody who will object to your recording a match, but it is a possibility. I haven't yet, but if I do then I just won't record that match. No big deal, no problem.

Looking forward to seeing some videos of your playing. From what you've written you seem like the sort of player who I'm fairly competitive with but still mostly lose to. It's fun for me to see the various playing styles, etc., of various players in the 3.0 to 4.0 range.
 
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