Fanning Poly Cross with Gut Mains

#1
Hi:

I am just curious about technique when stringing a hybrid with gut in the mains and poly in the crosses.

Does one still fan the crosses in the same manner across the gut when weaving?

Is there an approach one uses to lessen the abrasion on the gut?

Thanks!
 

MAX PLY

Hall of Fame
#2
Yes, you still fan and weave one ahead. However, if you want to take some additional stress off the gut, I suggest waxing it lightly with a chunk of paraffin wax. . . old school.
 
#3
Yes, you still fan and weave one ahead. However, if you want to take some additional stress off the gut, I suggest waxing it lightly with a chunk of paraffin wax. . . old school.
Thank you... Yes one ahead for sure... and I like the old school paraffin wax idea!!!
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
#4
Before weaving one ahead pull the next string to be tensioned against the last tensioned string. Pull most of the poly through, leave only enough to tension string, before tensioning cross. If you only leave the tip stuck in the racket you must fan the poly through a hard weave. No need for paraffin.
 
#5
As much as you guys may be right with paraffin, I gotta be honest, what a friggin' mess putting a coating on gut makes. I tried it one single time years ago and never again will I do that process. That crap got all over my hands, the crosses, the machine. Awful.
Weaving one ahead eliminates weaving friction. Just leave only what you need to reach the tension head on the outside of the frame, pull the rest through the frame
 

MAX PLY

Hall of Fame
#6
^^^Oh I agree, to an extent--if you do it lightly, it is not as big a mess but you should clean your clamps afterwards in any event. I don't need paraffin but I was just trying to assist the OP.
 
#7
As much as you guys may be right with paraffin, I gotta be honest, what a friggin' mess putting a coating on gut makes. I tried it one single time years ago and never again will I do that process. That crap got all over my hands, the crosses, the machine. Awful.
Weaving one ahead eliminates weaving friction. Just leave only what you need to reach the tension head on the outside of the frame, pull the rest through the frame
Thanks, so I always weave 1 ahead but I am not clear on the last sentence.... Perhaps I am doing things wrong.

I usually do this:

1. Pull tension on the current cross using the loop of string I left to get to the tensioning head from the "one-ahead". The loop is about 1 1/2 feet of string I would guesstimate.
2. Clamp
3. Take out the slack on the "one-ahead string" eliminating the loop I had just used to pull the last cross in step 1. I do my best to fan this but it is of course hard.
4. Weave the next cross "one-ahead" leaving a loop to get to the tensioning head. I fan as I pull this through.
5. I then pull tension on the loop for the current cross...
6. Clamp...

etc... etc.

Is this correct?
 
#8
OP, for step #1, all I'm saying that your "loop" should only be as long as you need it to be. Pull all the rest of the slack through the one-ahead-cross before you tension.
I was just talking about the loop end. If it only needs to be 14 inches, don't have it be 30 inches when you tension.
 
#9
To answer the question posed in #7, Yes. No waxing here for any NG. After finishing mains, I will wipe the strings with a paper towel with several drops of polish on it. Then I proceed as outline in #7. When fanning the crosses, I try not to go over the same areas of the mains too often.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
#10
Thanks, so I always weave 1 ahead but I am not clear on the last sentence.... Perhaps I am doing things wrong.

I usually do this:

1. Pull tension on the current cross using the loop of string I left to get to the tensioning head from the "one-ahead". The loop is about 1 1/2 feet of string I would guesstimate.
2. Clamp
3. Take out the slack on the "one-ahead string" eliminating the loop I had just used to pull the last cross in step 1. I do my best to fan this but it is of course hard.
4. Weave the next cross "one-ahead" leaving a loop to get to the tensioning head. I fan as I pull this through.
5. I then pull tension on the loop for the current cross...
6. Clamp...

etc... etc.

Is this correct?
When you weave the ‘one ahead’ cross is the next string to tension straight arcoss the string bed or is it pulled up against the last tensioned cross?
 
#11
OP, for step #1, all I'm saying that your "loop" should only be as long as you need it to be. Pull all the rest of the slack through the one-ahead-cross before you tension.
I was just talking about the loop end. If it only needs to be 14 inches, don't have it be 30 inches when you tension.
OK, thank you!
 
#12
To answer the question posed in #7, Yes. No waxing here for any NG. After finishing mains, I will wipe the strings with a paper towel with several drops of polish on it. Then I proceed as outline in #7. When fanning the crosses, I try not to go over the same areas of the mains too often.
Thanks! What kind of polish are you referring to?
 
#13
When you weave the ‘one ahead’ cross is the next string to tension straight arcoss the string bed or is it pulled up against the last tensioned cross?
I understand now. It is usually in alignment with grommets but you are suggesting pull it up against the last pulled string so that when I weave the 1 ahead the hills/valleys are taller/lower for the "one-head" string to slide through?

I do straighten the string as I apply tension and before clamping so that would bring it back into alignment with the grommets.

I think I understand the reasoning.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
#14
I understand now. It is usually in alignment with grommets but you are suggesting pull it up against the last pulled string so that when I weave the 1 ahead the hills/valleys are taller/lower for the "one-head" string to slide through?

I do straighten the string as I apply tension and before clamping so that would bring it back into alignment with the grommets.

I think I understand the reasoning.
This is especially important if you’re using a stiff string cross. If the string is not pulled against the last tensioned string you loose the benefit of going under high and over low strings. Even and odd crosses should be alternating, the farther away that string is from the last tensioned string the more it deflects the mains. The high strings are lowered and the lows strings are raised, you may as well not string one ahead.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
#15
I understand now. It is usually in alignment with grommets but you are suggesting pull it up against the last pulled string so that when I weave the 1 ahead the hills/valleys are taller/lower for the "one-head" string to slide through?

I do straighten the string as I apply tension and before clamping so that would bring it back into alignment with the grommets.

I think I understand the reasoning.
Here is a video I made earlier today showing how I weave one ahead.
 
#17
Here is a video I made earlier today showing how I weave one ahead.
The last 10 racquets or so I have strung using the technique you describe for sliding the next cross string to pull against the last string and then weaving the "One Ahead" string. I must say I feel much less resistance during the weave and the amount of time it adds is negligible and it is easy to incorporate into my routine.

Thanks again for the tip!
 
Top