Federer Holds the Racket on the Same Side Every Time !

Baris

New User
Federer holds the racket on the same side every time. Below are the pictures showing that the tension sticker is always at the top of the throat on backhand and forehand strokes with the new black RF97A. I checked around 50 close-up pictures of Fed holding the new black color RF97A the same way all the time. It can be seen from the previous red-black color version of the RF97A as well. When he was using the asymmetric colored 90 sq inch. BLX, this was quite obvious that he was holding the racket on the same side every time. This is most probably related to the custom grip mold. If he is doing it same time in a tournament, this cannot be a random sticker placement issue from the customization department. I believe that they want the rackets to be the exact same, therefore customization/stringer guys will place the sticker same side all the time at least in a tournament. As you can see in the pictures below, one hint is that on the same side of the sticker at the bottom of the V shape, there is a square logo visible in all the four pictures below indicating that the stickers are placed on the same side of the throat above the square white color logo. Also, the the tip of the W stencil logo having three noses show basically the sticker placement side.







 
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Baris

New User
Maybe the sticker was on the wrong side every now and then :D
I know that was coming :) I think at the below of the V shape is a fixed logo. Can't be a hologram? You can tell that it is printed. I do not have the new black version. That is why I don't know that does it actually exist in the retail version or not? Do you know what is that logo at the bottom part of the throat? If you tell me that is another sticker, this threat is totally busted :)
 
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Baris

New User
Don't most people favour one side. ?????
RFRF, you may be right but I tried it like rolling the racket in my hand while waiting the serve but not have the same side coming the way I wanted. Looks like a random side is coming all the time. Can be the way the grip is wrapped?
 

DNShade

Hall of Fame
This has been discussed many times before. Fed has always played one side for forehand and serve and the other for backhand. Many high level players do this. Just habit. I do it as well and have long before Fed was around - and I spin my stick every time before returning serve and always land on the same side. Has nothing to do with a custom grip at all. Just habit and very easy to always find the same side by feel alone. It's all about just knowing how to do one or two full spins and stopping it right. Something you don't even think about.
 

Baris

New User
This has been discussed many times before. Fed has always played one side for forehand and serve and the other for backhand. Many high level players do this. Just habit. I do it as well and have long before Fed was around - and I spin my stick every time before returning serve and always land on the same side. Has nothing to do with a custom grip at all. Just habit and very easy to always find the same side by feel alone. It's all about just knowing how to do one or two full spins and stopping it right. Something you don't even think about.
You may be right with the overgrip used certain amount of time. Think about he changes his racket every 7 games first and then after every 9 games with a brand new overgrip. He is not also spinning one or two times. It is more than 3-4 times before receiving the serve. How is that possible every time he keeps spinning and finding the right side if the rackets not having custom grip especially with fresh overgrip?
 

DNShade

Hall of Fame
You may be right with the overgrip used certain amount of time. Think about he changes his racket every 7 games first and then after every 9 games with a brand new overgrip. He is not also spinning one or two times. It is more than 3-4 times before receiving the serve. How is that possible every time he keeps spinning and finding the right side if the rackets not having custom grip especially with fresh overgrip?
It's easy to spin it multiple times - keep spinning it etc - and always land the same way. I do it all the time. It's all just habit and knowing what one revolution feels like in your hand. The momentum needed to just make one full revolution and then do it again. Spin, spin, spin, spin. Just keep landing on the same side. I can do it for an hour straight if need be and always land on the same side. No custom grip either.

It's very easy. Just requires practice. When you play tennis for hours on end and are waiting to return for hundreds of hours you gotta do something...ha.

Now I'm not saying that Fed doesn't have a custom grip - I know he does. But it's just a mold of his favorite handle of an old stick he has used so that P1 can match every frame to that. But it doesn't have anything to do with being able to spin the stick and land the same way up every time.
 
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Baris

New User
It's easy to spin it multiple times - keep spinning it etc - and always land the same way. I do it all the time. It's all just habit and knowing what one revolution feels like in your hand. The momentum needed to just make one full revolution and then do it again. Spin, spin, spin, spin. Just keep landing on the same side. I can do it for an hour straight if need be and always land on the same side. No custom grip either.

It's very easy. Just requires practice. When you play tennis for hours on end and are waiting to return for hundreds of hours you gotta do something...ha.
Is this true with the fresh racket right out of the bag? You may be right with few minutes of hitting with the same stick.
I would like to prove it once he picks up his racket and lands the sticker on top of the throat on first few service returns with the new stick. That is kinda tough to prove it :)
Like to hear experiences from other guys...
 

DNShade

Hall of Fame
Is this true with the fresh racket right out of the bag? You may be right with few minutes of hitting with the same stick.
I would like to prove it once he picks up his racket and lands the sticker on top of the throat on first few service returns with the new stick. That is kinda tough to prove it :)
Like to hear experiences from other guys...
Yeah. He holds the fresh stick the same way right out of the bag. The overgrip is wrapped the same way on each stick and the handle is the same so that part is easy.

There is no need to hear from other guys - I'm telling you exactly what happens. Fed just has a preference to hold the stick the same way on each frame regardless. That's why the stencil is always faces the same way etc. It's set up so that each stick matches and Fed doesn't have to think about anything. He holds the stick the same all the time.

Now I can't speak to the stringing sticker - I assume P1 does the same on each as well. Ron would be the one to confirm. You don't need to follow the sticker - just follow the stencil - much easier to see.

This really isn't a big deal. It's very common for good players to do this.
 

Baris

New User
Yeah. He holds the fresh stick the same way right out of the bag. The overgrip is wrapped the same way on each stick and the handle is the same so that part is easy.

There is no need to hear from other guys - I'm telling you exactly what happens. Fed just has a preference to hold the stick the same way on each frame regardless. That's why the stencil is always faces the same way etc. It's set up so that each stick matches and Fed doesn't have to think about anything. He holds the stick the same all the time.

Now I can't speak to the stringing sticker - I assume P1 does the same on each as well. Ron would be the one to confirm.

This really isn't a big deal. It's very common for good players to do this.
So with the retail rackets lets say with RF97A freshly over-gripped, it is not possible to have such possibility of holding the racket the same way all the time without looking at the racket? Because the grip is uniform in shape in the retail version and you have lets say a fresh overgrip such that you can not distinguish any side of the difference?
Thanks by the way for the quick responses...
 

DNShade

Hall of Fame
So with the retail rackets lets say with RF97A freshly over-gripped, it is not possible to have such possibility of holding the racket the same way all the time without looking at the racket? Because the grip is uniform in shape in the retail version and you have lets say a fresh overgrip such that you can not distinguish any side of the difference?
Thanks by the way for the quick responses...
No. It's easy to do with any racquet with any grip. I can do it with any stick. It's more about knowing what one complete revolution feels like than the grip feel. Whatever way up you start it it will stay that way.

That being said, every grip of every frame feels different on each side due to the way it's wrapped. Once you find the "right" side to you then you can feel it blindfolded. So once you find the side you prefer then you spin from there keeping it the same way up due to knowing how to spin one complete revolution each time and never have to look at the stick to see which way is up.

Someone can hand you any random frame and ask you to spin it and keep it on the same side even without knowing the feel of the grip or having found your favorite grip side. That make sense? It really is easy. Just a muscle memory thing from tons of repetitions. Not hard.

Now Fed doesn't have to find what side of the grip feels best each time due to the fact that P1 matches the frame and grips and wraps the overgrip the same way starting at the same place etc.
 
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jmacdaununder2

Hall of Fame
It was mooted by RanchDressing in post #8 of the 'Does Federer Actually Play With the RF97?' thread that Federer's custom handle mold has a pinky groove; if true this would no doubt provide substantial sensory feedback. in any case, I agree with DNShade that you could always have the racquet end up the 'right' way if you spun it often enough. If all the overgrips are put on with the same starting point, his racquets would all feel 'right' one way.
 
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DNShade

Hall of Fame
It was mooted by RanchDressing in post #8 of the 'Does Federer Actually Play With the RF97?' post that Federer's custom handle mold has a pinky groove; if true this would no doubt provide substantial sensory feedback. in any case, I agree with DNShade that you could always have the racquet end up the 'right' way if you spun it often enough. If all the overgrips are put on with the same starting point, his racquets would all feel 'right' one way.
Yeah. It's a very simple thing to learn how to do. As I said I don't know Fed's handle mold - but I know it's based on his favorite handle of a frame he played with etc. Perhaps there is a pinky groove or some other asymmetrical shape to it I don't know for sure but as far as I know it's just a regular Wilson handle based on Fed's favorite etc.

RanchDressing isn't anyone I would call as a reliable witness to anything when it comes to Fed's stick - LOL He's got his own tennis INFOWARS thing going on - ha.

Regardless, that really doesn't have anything to do with spinning the stick and having it land the same way up each time. That's just practice and muscle memory and something I never even thought about doing, it just happens.
 
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So with the retail rackets lets say with RF97A freshly over-gripped, it is not possible to have such possibility of holding the racket the same way all the time without looking at the racket? Because the grip is uniform in shape in the retail version and you have lets say a fresh overgrip such that you can not distinguish any side of the difference?
Thanks by the way for the quick responses...
I use a Yonex and I both use the same side of the racquet (because I want the same 'feel' on contact, the other side feels different) and also spin it while returning. It is not even something that I saw Fed doing and decided to imitate him. It's just something that happened almost involuntarily as I got used to the racquet. So all you need is to be playing with the same racquet (as in same model and specs) all the time.
 

DNShade

Hall of Fame
I use a Yonex and I both use the same side of the racquet (because I want the same 'feel' on contact, the other side feels different) and also spin it while returning. It is not even something that I saw Fed doing and decided to imitate him. It's just something that happened almost involuntarily as I got used to the racquet. So all you need is to be playing with the same racquet (as in same model and specs) all the time.
Ooooh, that's a bingo!
 

Baris

New User
Why would you always want to hit one stroke with the same side of the racket if you are a pro with racket sponsor? :) It is because of the problematic ink of the stencil. If you hit forehand with one side, it will tear the ink accordingly depending on your stroke. Backhand and forehand strokes are not the same, therefore you DO want to keep striking forehand with always one side of the racket that has stencil ink may be worn out at certain spots that you like better and got used to rather than the backhand side which might have a different hitting pattern.
 

Doubles

Legend
Honestly I think this is fairly common. I've even noticed on my own racquets where there's a certain bulge at the buttcap where the base grip is started. I tend to wrap my overgrips at that point to further pronounce the flair and that way I get a more secure feel on the handle. Federer's is probably similar to mine in that regard.
 

xFullCourtTenniSx

Hall of Fame
You may be right with the overgrip used certain amount of time. Think about he changes his racket every 7 games first and then after every 9 games with a brand new overgrip. He is not also spinning one or two times. It is more than 3-4 times before receiving the serve. How is that possible every time he keeps spinning and finding the right side if the rackets not having custom grip especially with fresh overgrip?
Cause the grips aren't uniform. They never are and never will unless it's 100% bare with a custom buttcap (since some have asymmetric designs like Wilson's). It's more obvious if you hold the racket by the buttcap like Federer does rather than choking up on the racket like many beginners and lower level players do. The grip has to overlap to a certain extent at the beginning, and that results in a noticeable difference (you could even call it a bump) on one side. As for spinning, you have your off hand to feel and control the spins.

Why would you always want to hit one stroke with the same side of the racket if you are a pro with racket sponsor? :) It is because of the problematic ink of the stencil. If you hit forehand with one side, it will tear the ink accordingly depending on your stroke. Backhand and forehand strokes are not the same, therefore you DO want to keep striking forehand with always one side of the racket that has stencil ink may be worn out at certain spots that you like better and got used to rather than the backhand side which might have a different hitting pattern.
Tennis players are creatures of habit. And when you notice a difference in the way the racket feels in your hand when it's one way up or another, you definitely start developing a preference for one side. After that, swing with the racket "upside down" actually feels insanely wrong and your body will find ways to avoid it happening. I mean, when pros will pay thousands of dollars to get their rackets matched, is it really that much of a surprise that they want to feel the same side of the grip everytime they hit the ball? It's like holding a fork backwards. It just feels wrong and uncomfortable.
 

West Coast Ace

G.O.A.T.
RFRF, you may be right but I tried it like rolling the racket in my hand while waiting the serve but not have the same side coming the way I wanted. Looks like a random side is coming all the time. Can be the way the grip is wrapped?
Fed has a custom handle with a 'slot' created for one finger (forget which) - so he can spin and always find it.
 

West Coast Ace

G.O.A.T.
It was mooted by RanchDressing in post #8 of the 'Does Federer Actually Play With the RF97?' post that Federer's custom handle mold has a pinky groove; if true this would no doubt provide substantial sensory feedback. in any case, I agree with DNShade that you could always have the racquet end up the 'right' way if you spun it often enough. If all the overgrips are put on with the same starting point, his racquets would all feel 'right' one way.
Sorry, didn't see you already gave the correct answer. :)
 

RJYU

Rookie
Fed has a custom handle with a 'slot' created for one finger (forget which) - so he can spin and always find it.
Roger's handle does not have a "slot" in it. His handle is pretty standard, and based upon a normal Wilson handle. Like most pro players, he uses one side of the racquet due to the bump created by the grip start on one side. Some players prefer the bump to be next to their palm on the forehand, while others prefer it away. Since we always start the grip wrap in the same spot on all his frames, he'll always play it the same way. Like I said, most pro players do the same assuming the grip start is always the same on their frames.
 

mr_eko

Professional
I grip my racket on he same side as well. Any grip will eventually contour to the shape of your hand and be more comfortable.
 

West Coast Ace

G.O.A.T.
Roger's handle does not have a "slot" in it. His handle is pretty standard, and based upon a normal Wilson handle. Like most pro players, he uses one side of the racquet due to the bump created by the grip start on one side. Some players prefer the bump to be next to their palm on the forehand, while others prefer it away. Since we always start the grip wrap in the same spot on all his frames, he'll always play it the same way. Like I said, most pro players do the same assuming the grip start is always the same on their frames.
Thanks. You'll have to go find the reporter putting that info out on the internet. Was a few yrs ago. And a legit site.

Enjoy NYC.
 

Baris

New User
Fed has a custom handle with a 'slot' created for one finger (forget which) - so he can spin and always find it.
That totally explains the reason.
Is the below picture might tell us your statement true? Check the far left racket handle. It has an angled shape at the bottom part of the handle kind of angled and less bump version of the Gasquet's racket handle. On the other hand, the top racket handle is more like flat which is probably the opposite side of the far left racket because the P1 logo is located at the side rather than at top of the leather grip as in the far left racket. This was one of the first blacked out RF97A from May 2014.

 
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West Coast Ace

G.O.A.T.
That totally explains the reason.
Is the below picture might tell us your statement true? Check the far left racket handle. It has an angled shape at the bottom part of the handle. This was one of the first blacked out 97A from May 2014.

Thanks. Very sweet picture.
 

Baris

New User
Thanks. Very sweet picture.
Thanks West Coast Ace. You said it first quite comfortably that he has a custom handle. I just found the picture.
By the way, why don't we destroy our RF97As to match the handle like this? :) I really wonder to see how comfortable that handle shape is. Or how uncomfortable that is gonna be :) I really like to hear some opinions on it.
Hold on, I changed my mind, let's try it on a cheaper stick :)
 

Baris

New User
One of the best ways of holding the racket with the below handle shape is that the thumb sits on the curly part and the palm on the other side which is look like more closer to the retail handle.

 

DNShade

Hall of Fame
Fed has a custom handle with a 'slot' created for one finger (forget which) - so he can spin and always find it.
That totally explains the reason.
Did you not see Ron's post?
Roger's handle does not have a "slot" in it. His handle is pretty standard, and based upon a normal Wilson handle. Like most pro players, he uses one side of the racquet due to the bump created by the grip start on one side. Some players prefer the bump to be next to their palm on the forehand, while others prefer it away. Since we always start the grip wrap in the same spot on all his frames, he'll always play it the same way. Like I said, most pro players do the same assuming the grip start is always the same on their frames.
That is Ron from P1 - you know the guy who actually works on and strings Roger's frames - Roger's handles do not have a "pinky slot" on it. It's just a standard handle as I said above multiple times.
 

DNShade

Hall of Fame
Roger's handle does not have a "slot" in it. His handle is pretty standard, and based upon a normal Wilson handle. Like most pro players, he uses one side of the racquet due to the bump created by the grip start on one side. Some players prefer the bump to be next to their palm on the forehand, while others prefer it away. Since we always start the grip wrap in the same spot on all his frames, he'll always play it the same way. Like I said, most pro players do the same assuming the grip start is always the same on their frames.
Thank you Ron. Trying to explain this to multiple people out here that think it's some kind of magic to be able to find the same side of the stick just by feel or spin it and always lad the same way. It just becomes habit and something you don't even think about and just a preference due to the way the grip is wrapped. Thanks again.
 

BA10S

Rookie
Roger's handle does not have a "slot" in it. His handle is pretty standard, and based upon a normal Wilson handle. Like most pro players, he uses one side of the racquet due to the bump created by the grip start on one side. Some players prefer the bump to be next to their palm on the forehand, while others prefer it away. Since we always start the grip wrap in the same spot on all his frames, he'll always play it the same way. Like I said, most pro players do the same assuming the grip start is always the same on their frames.
Thanks for the information Ron. From the picture of Federer's frames above, it looks like his overgrips are always wrapped by starting on one of the wide bevels (3 or 7 if the bevels are assigned the numbers 1 to 8 starting from the top and going clockwise).

It is hard to tell for sure, but the leather replacement grip appears to be started on the opposite wide bevel to the overgrip. Is that correct? If it is, then which side of the racquet do you consider to have the 'bump' (since doing this tends to even out the buttcap)?

I'd guess that it'd be the side where the overgrip is started, and if so then from the pictures I've looked at, it seems that Federer is one of the players preferring the 'bump' next to his palm on his extreme eastern FH which is hit with the same side of the racquet as his serve.

I actually prefer to start the overgrip and replacement grip at the same spot (one of the wide bevels) to make the bump more noticeable. I am different to most players however, in that I hit with the same side of the racquet for FHs and BHs and the opposite side for serves. A benefit of doing this is that very minimal grip changes are necessary, but unfortunately string life suffers! In my case (and I would assume many others too) it is my forehand that breaks strings so simply using the same side for FHs would have the same effect. But if you hit a similar ball off both sides and hit roughly equal numbers of FHs and BHs, then you will effectively halve the life of your strings! Using, the bevel numbering system described above, my index knuckle/heel pad position on FHs is 5/4.5, 1/1 on (topspin) BHs and 2/2 on serves. So, again assuming the previous paragraph is correct, the bump at the buttcap on my racquets is in very close to the same spot as Federer for BHs and serves but a little different for FHs. I've experimented and definitely found this to work best for me.

I'd be interested to know what others' grip setups are if anyone wants to share!
 

Bender

G.O.A.T.
I hold it the same way every time...I assumed that this was a common thing for most players, but apparently I was wrong if this warrants a separate thread.

FWIW, I used also hit on the same side every side for all strokes except the backhand volley and slice, because I used to use a closed grip on my 2HBH--right hand BH eastern, left hand SW--and a SW 1HBH before that.

Edit: I use a more conventional grip for my 2HBH now, so all my backhand shots (backhand overhead, 2HBH, slice, volley) use one side, while all forehand shots and serve / overheads use the other.
 

Baris

New User
Thanks for the information Ron. From the picture of Federer's frames above, it looks like his overgrips are always wrapped by starting on one of the wide bevels (3 or 7 if the bevels are assigned the numbers 1 to 8 starting from the top and going clockwise).

It is hard to tell for sure, but the leather replacement grip appears to be started on the opposite wide bevel to the overgrip. Is that correct? If it is, then which side of the racquet do you consider to have the 'bump' (since doing this tends to even out the buttcap)?

I'd guess that it'd be the side where the overgrip is started, and if so then from the pictures I've looked at, it seems that Federer is one of the players preferring the 'bump' next to his palm on his extreme eastern FH which is hit with the same side of the racquet as his serve.

I actually prefer to start the overgrip and replacement grip at the same spot (one of the wide bevels) to make the bump more noticeable. I am different to most players however, in that I hit with the same side of the racquet for FHs and BHs and the opposite side for serves. A benefit of doing this is that very minimal grip changes are necessary, but unfortunately string life suffers! In my case (and I would assume many others too) it is my forehand that breaks strings so simply using the same side for FHs would have the same effect. But if you hit a similar ball off both sides and hit roughly equal numbers of FHs and BHs, then you will effectively halve the life of your strings! Using, the bevel numbering system described above, my index knuckle/heel pad position on FHs is 5/4.5, 1/1 on (topspin) BHs and 2/2 on serves. So, again assuming the previous paragraph is correct, the bump at the buttcap on my racquets is in very close to the same spot as Federer for BHs and serves but a little different for FHs. I've experimented and definitely found this to work best for me.

I'd be interested to know what others' grip setups are if anyone wants to share!
The below picture from Priority 1 kind of proves what you and Ron said about the start of leather gripping of the Roger's frame. If you look at the top far right RF97A, it looks like the bump at the bottom part of the handle on the right side (underneath the W logo) is slightly bigger than the left side one due to the starting of the leather grip.

 

Firstservingman

Talk Tennis Guru
I always hold it the exact same way he does. Right hand, Wilson hologram sticker facing down, string paint job W "pointing" up.
 

BA10S

Rookie
The below picture from Priority 1 kind of proves what you and Ron said about the start of leather gripping of the Roger's frame. If you look at the top far right RF97A, it looks like the bump at the bottom part of the handle on the right side (underneath the W logo) is slightly bigger than the left side one due to the starting of the leather grip.

Thanks for sharing this picture. There does seem to be a bump on the bottom of the 'W'. This is actually the opposite of what I had thought, but makes sense when you consider that the leather grip is much thicker than the overgrip. It also means that Federer has the bump opposite his palm on the FH and that, unfortunately I suppose, I in fact have the opposite 'grip setup' to him on the serve and BH!
 
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Baris

New User
Thanks for sharing this picture, there does seem to be a bump on the bottom of the 'W'. This is actually the opposite of what I had thought, but makes sense when you consider that the leather grip is much thicker than the overgrip. It also means that Federer has the bump opposite his palm on the FH and that, unfortunately I suppose, I in fact have the opposite 'grip setup' to him on the serve and BH
My pleasure. They are all out there thanks to Ron and P1 for posting those pics. I just need to dig in deep to find them :)
Now with even two overgrips on my RF97A, I can feel the sides. How? I feel the small bump on the tip of my RING finger. Thanks guys. DNShade thanks to you too for all the quick and very useful responses...
 

tennisBIEST

Professional
The below picture from Priority 1 kind of proves what you and Ron said about the start of leather gripping of the Roger's frame. If you look at the top far right RF97A, it looks like the bump at the bottom part of the handle on the right side (underneath the W logo) is slightly bigger than the left side one due to the starting of the leather grip.

I also find it interesting that Fed's butt cap doesn't have a trap door like Milos.
 

PBODY99

Legend
@DNShade

When they have installed several leather grip they would realize that the bottom of the grip will give the you the handle shape shown
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
I don't know if it was mentioned before but the custom mold may be asymmetrical. I have a few frames with custom molded grips and I'll take a look at them tonight to see if they are asymmetric.
 
Cause the grips aren't uniform. They never are and never will unless it's 100% bare with a custom buttcap (since some have asymmetric designs like Wilson's). It's more obvious if you hold the racket by the buttcap like Federer does rather than choking up on the racket like many beginners and lower level players do. The grip has to overlap to a certain extent at the beginning, and that results in a noticeable difference (you could even call it a bump) on one side. As for spinning, you have your off hand to feel and control the spins.

^Agreed I hold my racket by the buttcap and the grip overlap (a bump) does felt noticeable difference so I always hold my racket on the same size.


Tennis players are creatures of habit. And when you notice a difference in the way the racket feels in your hand when it's one way up or another, you definitely start developing a preference for one side. After that, swing with the racket "upside down" actually feels insanely wrong and your body will find ways to avoid it happening. I mean, when pros will pay thousands of dollars to get their rackets matched, is it really that much of a surprise that they want to feel the same side of the grip everytime they hit the ball? It's like holding a fork backwards. It just feels wrong and uncomfortable.
 

Zoolander

Hall of Fame
Thanks for the information Ron. From the picture of Federer's frames above, it looks like his overgrips are always wrapped by starting on one of the wide bevels (3 or 7 if the bevels are assigned the numbers 1 to 8 starting from the top and going clockwise).

It is hard to tell for sure, but the leather replacement grip appears to be started on the opposite wide bevel to the overgrip. Is that correct? If it is, then which side of the racquet do you consider to have the 'bump' (since doing this tends to even out the buttcap)?

I'd guess that it'd be the side where the overgrip is started, and if so then from the pictures I've looked at, it seems that Federer is one of the players preferring the 'bump' next to his palm on his extreme eastern FH which is hit with the same side of the racquet as his serve.

I actually prefer to start the overgrip and replacement grip at the same spot (one of the wide bevels) to make the bump more noticeable. I am different to most players however, in that I hit with the same side of the racquet for FHs and BHs and the opposite side for serves. A benefit of doing this is that very minimal grip changes are necessary, but unfortunately string life suffers! In my case (and I would assume many others too) it is my forehand that breaks strings so simply using the same side for FHs would have the same effect. But if you hit a similar ball off both sides and hit roughly equal numbers of FHs and BHs, then you will effectively halve the life of your strings! Using, the bevel numbering system described above, my index knuckle/heel pad position on FHs is 5/4.5, 1/1 on (topspin) BHs and 2/2 on serves. So, again assuming the previous paragraph is correct, the bump at the buttcap on my racquets is in very close to the same spot as Federer for BHs and serves but a little different for FHs. I've experimented and definitely found this to work best for me.

I'd be interested to know what others' grip setups are if anyone wants to share!
I hate the bump with a passion! Nothing more annoying than 2 sides of your handle feeling different. I always start the overgrip on the other side to try and even it out. And nowadays i trim the start of the actual grip at an angle so there is almost no overlap when you wrap the grip around the very first time.

If there is a type of " shrink sleeve" grip out there that is comfy and does away with the wrapping process, somebody please tell me!
 

GatorAuthor

New User
Got 2 sticks restrung and found the stencil one one was backwards, and the stencil on the other was much heavier. Lost my match that night bc the hoop weighting on the 1st stick was reversed, PLUS I couldn't hit the ball right on the boundary of stenciled v clean string as I always do. Hence, that was unplayable. The other stick with the heavy stencil was at least 1/10th of a point head heavier, and the additional plow thru had me hitting the ball 1/2" long all night! Ugh!


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racquetreligion

Hall of Fame
I angle grind my bumper guards down so they are circular or smooth no corners as soon as I get new sticks
it was an expensive habit when I had short romances
 

Jalee

Rookie
I'm not even pro and know exactly which side I will hit each shot with due to the groove I have in my grip. I'm pretty sure priority1 has a custom grip for him and he holds it the exact way all the time. RG is the same. It's simply a preference in how your hand lines up on the grip.
 

jmacdaununder2

Hall of Fame
Got 2 sticks restrung and found the stencil one one was backwards, and the stencil on the other was much heavier. Lost my match that night bc the hoop weighting on the 1st stick was reversed, PLUS I couldn't hit the ball right on the boundary of stenciled v clean string as I always do. Hence, that was unplayable. The other stick with the heavy stencil was at least 1/10th of a point head heavier, and the additional plow thru had me hitting the ball 1/2" long all night! Ugh!


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It's absolute hell when a company updates the logo on it's stencils. I can't begin to describe the tribulations I endured when Prince took the tail off of their 'longbody' stencil logo; instantly it rendered all of my racquets unacceptably headlight - as they were all strung on the morning of my 'D' Grade doubles round robin, there was no time to rectify the situation!:eek:
 

jvutennis

New User
If you ever watch old matches when he used the Wilson BLX Pro Staff Six.One Tour 90, you can clearly see the racquet placed on the same way throughout the match. It's rather impressive the way he holds the racquet the same way considering he spins it as much as he does.
 
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