Federer News

Hitman

Bionic Poster
This is just massive. Cahill was saying right before the draw that for Roger (because of his age), the scheduling would be more important than the draw itself. Then he specifically mentioned the staggered men's semis, saying that if Roger reached that stage and played the second semifinal, it would be "a significant hindrance because he's 37. Recovery is so much less than at 25." That's paraphrasing, but very close to his words.
I had a feeling he was going to get the first semi final, good for him that he got it, considering his route to the title is a possible Nadal Djokovic back to back war, so the extra day will help immensely in his case. I do think he makes the semi at least, if not the final here.
 
I came across an interesting, old, long, and informative interview from Fedr.. On Retirement, Family Life on Tour...

This was about 4yrs ago, in 2015 around Rotterdam time, the year before the Olympics. Interestingly, if we swap 2015 with 2019, Fedr's comments seem to apply for today just as well. And the questions are similar too!

Watch if you have some time ;).
Might need to watch on youtube site.
Main part starts around 6:10s:
 
obviously getting the best of his biggest rival after 6 months off and winning a slam after years of not winning is hard to top, but I also enjoyed his 20th slam as well.

My favourites are probably 2007 Wimbly, 2009 Wimbly and 2017 AO. Of course, for his legacy, 2009 RG was UUUGE. Also fond of 2007 AO and 2004 USO. Oh, and USO 2008 given he hadn't been winning for a while smack bang in his supposed prime/peak.
 
My favourites are probably 2007 Wimbly, 2009 Wimbly and 2017 AO. Of course, for his legacy, 2009 RG was UUUGE. Also fond of 2007 AO and 2004 USO. Oh, and USO 2008 given he hadn't been winning for a while smack bang in his supposed prime/peak.
2009 FO is still one of my favorite slams, I know AO 2017 has sort of taken over as one of his most epic, largely I think in part to overcoming nadal, but man I'll never get the ride of 2009 FO from rafa's shock loss, then nole's, to fed nearly losing to tommy haas,
and then having close matches with del potro and monfils, and then the final came and that weird incident with that dude that randomly ran over to fed, fed finally winning his 1st and only French open, I believe the swiss anthem playing and hten him crying...it was intense and wonderful.

I also enjoyed Wimbledon 2009 ofcourse, 2007, US open 2008 (another great journey for the story).
 
obviously getting the best of his biggest rival after 6 months off and winning a slam after years of not winning is hard to top, but I also enjoyed his 20th slam as well.
There's a couple of interviews where he's linked AO 17 to W 08. W 08 is now routinely "the greatest match of all time" which he lost and then AO 17 was called "the GOAT decider" and "most important match in Open Era" and he won that one. So I think in his mind the two are linked.

I personally always link AO 09 and AO 17 for obvious reasons but I can see why he might see it differently.
 
it was intense and wonderful.
The match that could have cost me my relationship.....

I couldn't bear to watch but my partner called me down when he was serving for the match saying "you've got to see him win it". Then of course he went break point down and I was basically screaming "if he loses it's all your fault."

Still wonder what would have happened if Soderling had come back . I remember Lendl doing it to McEnroe so it's not like it was totally impossible.
 
The match that could have cost me my relationship.....

I couldn't bear to watch but my partner called me down when he was serving for the match saying "you've got to see him win it". Then of course he went break point down and I was basically screaming "if he loses it's all your fault."

Still wonder what would have happened if Soderling had come back . I remember Lendl doing it to McEnroe so it's not like it was totally impossible.
lmao I think what made the journey also memorable is just going through it with the rest of the fed fans on TTW and even some non fed fans who just wanted to witness history and everyone being like holy ****, when fed saved match point or w/e and then ofcourse again putting everyone through hell I think with del potro.
 
There's a couple of interviews where he's linked AO 17 to W 08. W 08 is now routinely "the greatest match of all time" which he lost and then AO 17 was called "the GOAT decider" and "most important match in Open Era" and he won that one. So I think in his mind the two are linked.

I personally always link AO 09 and AO 17 for obvious reasons but I can see why he might see it differently.
I've actually also seen him link Ao 2017 to French open 2009 as well. When he got asked is this possibly the most memorable and he was like yeah it could be, maybe up with French open 2009 since he finally got the career slam. he always said after that, he could breathe a bit more.

though yeah I can see why, due to the same it being the course of 5 dramatic sets with the same opponent, why those two would be linked as well.
 
The match that could have cost me my relationship.....

I couldn't bear to watch but my partner called me down when he was serving for the match saying "you've got to see him win it". Then of course he went break point down and I was basically screaming "if he loses it's all your fault."

Still wonder what would have happened if Soderling had come back . I remember Lendl doing it to McEnroe so it's not like it was totally impossible.
I technically didn't get to see the final match live, I participating in a walkathon during the same time, although I was on the phone with my cousin while walking getting a play by play and I jumped and yelled when I found out he won and everyone around me was like umm...? Ofcourse afterwards when I got home, I got to watch the replay
 

Hitman

Bionic Poster
When it is his time, I also feel it should be at Wimbledon. Where it all began for him, where he met Sampras on Centre Court, where he won his first slam, where he broke the slam record.

Tennis' greatest champion bowing out on the greatest court of them of all, the court which he called home, the court of which he is its greatest mens champion.
 
When it is his time, I also feel it should be at Wimbledon. Where it all began for him, where he met Sampras on Centre Court, where he won his first slam, where he broke the slam record.

Tennis' greatest champion bowing out on the greatest court of them of all, the court which he called home, the court of which he is its greatest mens champion.
yeah that would be ideal. As he said before, I do hope he goes out on his own terms. Knowing fed he will just mic drop announce that he is done at the last minute and remain competitive until the very end so he doesn't lose any edge over players.
 
Federer does have that I guess added bonus of any place he retires, people will definitely be emotional and it was still be considered a great farewell. I mean there is also basel, his home tournament, he could retire at laver cup now, he could retire at freaking cincy imo and it would still be special imo. Granted Wimbledon would be the best. I've pretty much given up on him getting another USO, but what a way to go if he were to do it at USO, winning a 6th record breaking USO and retiring under the lights so to speak.
 
When it is his time, I also feel it should be at Wimbledon. Where it all began for him, where he met Sampras on Centre Court, where he won his first slam, where he broke the slam record.

Tennis' greatest champion bowing out on the greatest court of them of all, the court which he called home, the court of which he is its greatest mens champion.
Classy post as always Hitman. Refreshing to have you back on the boards restoring some order ;)
 
I have no idea how any of us are supposed to get through it. Between our tears, his tears (which will be many of course), gushing journalists, it's going to be like every single Pixar movie rolled into one.
if people think the fawning over fed is bad now, wait until the day he retires and afterwards as well. I assume he is still going to be the talk of the town for a while even after retirement
 
I have no idea how any of us are supposed to get through it. Between our tears, his tears (which will be many of course), gushing journalists, it's going to be like every single Pixar movie rolled into one.
I'm not sure I'll even know what to say. Pretty hard to express through words on a screen. It will be a crazy crazy day that's for certain.
 
I have no idea how any of us are supposed to get through it. Between our tears, his tears (which will be many of course), gushing journalists, it's going to be like every single Pixar movie rolled into one.
I am not thinking about this day.It will come in the near future but until it comes I will continue to enjoy watching Federer on the court.
 
Watched Inside Out again recently when it came on over the holidays; the feels were real.
Inside Out is a fabulous film - I bore my teenage daughter with explaining what snobbery it is to not see it as a great work of art equivalent to any play on stage.

"Up" though I thought was trying too hard - it sort of worked on me but I thought I was being manipulated a bit. Always a fine line with Pixar.
 
Inside Out is a fabulous film - I bore my teenage daughter with explaining what snobbery it is to not see it as a great work of art equivalent to any play on stage.

"Up" though I thought was trying too hard - it sort of worked on me but I thought I was being manipulated a bit. Always a fine line with Pixar.
Perhaps it was; I just remember thinking 'balloons wouldn't do that' despite the obvious fictional factors at play throughout. 'That' montage was very powerful, though, and I still thought the film was great.

Inside Out just took those sorts of ambitious, grown up-oriented themes and extended them to basically the entire film. It's up there with my fave Pixar efforts, probably in my top 3.
 
Perhaps it was; I just remember thinking 'balloons wouldn't do that' despite the obvious fictional factors at play throughout. 'That' montage was very powerful, though, and I still thought the film was great.

Inside Out just took those sorts of ambitious, grown up-oriented themes and extended them to basically the entire film. It's up there with my fave Pixar efforts, probably in my top 3.
And don't even get me started on Fedal as Joy/Sadness......
 
Found this rather nice story under a Youtube video. Obviously can't verify if true or not but didn't sound like something made up. I'm pretty sure I've seen it commented that he has an amazing memory for faces.

I was fortunate enough to cross paths with this legend a couple of times, simply by chance. Having lived in Switzerland for over 30 years, these things are bound to happen, as long as you aren't a total couch potato. Anyway, the first time I saw him was at a ski resort while he was playing with his first two little twins in the snow, and after a rather blatant double-take I joked that he appeared to have mastered fatherhood as well as his backhand. He laughed and replied "Not even close." After offering a quick congratulatory high five for his success, I wished him luck with the girls and went on my way... About a year later we literally bumped into each other at a restaurant, and this time he did the double-take before inquiring in his native tongue (Swiss German), "Kenne mir uns von irgendwo?" ("Don't we know each other from somewhere?"). After replying about our one and only earlier encounter, he asked, this time in English, "But aren't you American?" I told him I was, but that after living here long enough, drinking more than my share of Kafe-schnapps and Schuemli-Pfluemlis, and attending countless Lozaerner Faschnachts (Carnival in Lucerne - 5 days of complete insanity), the language and dialect just kind of rubs off on you. This time he offered the high-five, before wishing each other a "Schoene abigg und en Guete" (Swiss German for "Have a nice evening and bon appetit"). A true gentleman.
 
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When it is his time, I also feel it should be at Wimbledon. Where it all began for him, where he met Sampras on Centre Court, where he won his first slam, where he broke the slam record.

Tennis' greatest champion bowing out on the greatest court of them of all, the court which he called home, the court of which he is its greatest mens champion.
I'd prefer he did it where it literally started....Basel, Switzerland.

If it's at a smaller tournament, they can have a proper celebration, just like he got for #1 in Rotterdam last year. If it's Wimbledon, they might have to shuffle him along at a quicker pace to make sure they get the rest of their matches in while there's still daylight.
 

Hitman

Bionic Poster
I'd prefer he did it where it literally started....Basel, Switzerland.

If it's at a smaller tournament, they can have a proper celebration, just like he got for #1 in Rotterdam last year. If it's Wimbledon, they might have to shuffle him along at a quicker pace to make sure they get the rest of their matches in while there's still daylight.
I doubt it, Centre Court can get play in until 11pm.
 
Stan is right. And I hope that is some small motivation for Fedr. He has a unique opportunity at this point in his career that he can litterally set records almost every time he steps on court. It's FunTimes for the OldMan and long may it continue. ;)8-B
This will sound strange, but I don't want him playing with any motivation.

I find him the most fun to watch (and often most successful) when he steps out on court with no pressure and just to enjoy playing. The "it's okay to lose" mantra resulted in the greatest tournament of his life in 2017.
 
This will sound strange, but I don't want him playing with any motivation.

I find him the most fun to watch (and often most successful) when he steps out on court with no pressure and just to enjoy playing. The "it's okay to lose" mantra resulted in the greatest tournament of his life in 2017.
You're absolutely right! A fun-having, free-flowing Fedr is the most dangerous.

By 'motivation', I just meant that I hope it keeps him interested so that he keeps playing. Fun is also a good motivator. I just want him healthy and still playing whether he's motivated by 'fun' or 'achievements' or from his kids kicking him out of the house so they have time to 'miss' him, I'll accept it all :p.
 
You're absolutely right! A fun-having, free-flowing Fedr is the most dangerous.

By 'motivation', I just meant that I hope it keeps him interested so that he keeps playing. Fun is also a good motivator. I just want him healthy and still playing whether he's motivated by 'fun' or 'achievements' or from his kids kicking him out of the house so they have time to 'miss' him, I'll accept it all :p.
Records are awesome, but it's the last thing I want him focused on.

He admitted last year that he was uncharacteristically nervous before the AO final because he kept thinking about 20. He was such a big favorite all tournament long, and he tried his best to downplay it, but at the end of the day he couldn't help that everyone in the world was expecting him to win, and the pressure nearly did him in. He just wants to be the old man underdog playing with nothing to lose (but he keeps winning so we don't let him!).

I want him to play this Australia like the underdog he thinks he is. Not focused on getting 100 titles or the record 7th. Just take it one match at a time and enjoy it.
 
Roger Federer has been ‘‘hit hard’’ by the imminent retirement of his rival Andy Murray, but disputed the view that Murray had been unlucky to play in the same era as Federer, Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic.

Federer said Murray had much to be proud of, pointing to his (three) major titles, reaching world No. 1 (2016) and Olympic golds, while expressing some ‘‘shock’’ that the Scot would be finishing up this year, as Murray said in an emotional media conference on Friday.

‘‘It hit me hard,’’ Federer told the Sunday Age in an exclusive interview. ‘‘Of course, I’ve seen Andy struggling you know with his hip and with his fitness for quite some time now.

‘‘You want somebody to go there and feel like he’s happy to retire. The problem is it’s not his decision, it’s the body’s decision and that naturally hurts.’’

Federer did not concur with the widespread view – voiced since Murray’s surprise announcement that he aimed to retire after Wimbledon, if not much sooner, due to his chronic hip problem – that the Scot had been unlucky in the timing of his career.

‘‘I mean, he won Wimbledon, he won the Oympics, became world No. 1. Is that unlucky? I don’t know. I always said you can have great careers, you can have great careers side by side. Maybe from Aussie stand point, yes he’s been unlucky because he made five finals here [in Melbourne] and never won one. But that’s why I think he will also be even more loved you know because he maybe didn’t make it here.

‘‘But I don’t think he will say or that we should say that he’s been unlucky, I think he’s worked extremely hard and when he got to world No. 1 or he won all those big event that he did, totally deserved them ... he put in the workload and he’s an extremely talented player as well.’’
Federer said Murray had given his all and ‘‘made Scotland proud’’. ‘‘I feel like he left everything out there. There was never any doubts there. And I think he should be very proud even though he was extremely sad in the press conference and you know, you don’t want to see that.’’

Federer told the Sunday Age he was well-placed for this campaign, with no fitness issues, but he declared that this Open was “totally up for grabs’’ and he did not think he was entitled to favouritism.
‘‘Last year I also came in not expecting to defend again. In a way I also feel again, you know, it’s totally up for grabs again. I don’t think you can put me massive favourite. If you can put anybody as a big favourite, I think it would be Novak – or Rafa if he’s, you know, fully fully fit. You know, but only the first couple of matches will show where his level’s at. To my side, I just hope to be in the mix when it comes down the stretch.’’
Federer has often been asked for his view of Australia’s enigmatic talent Nick Kyrgios and his reply this time reflected that he was sick of fielding questions about the 23-year-old and that the ball was entirely in Kyrgios’ court.

‘‘I get asked every time and I’m tired of answering the question. I like Nick, look at the end of the day and I think he’s a wonderful player and he’s got incredible shots and he knows that, we all know that. It’s just a question of how much he wants it. It’s up to him to decide how he wants to go about it.’’

Federer has never lost to his first round opponent Denis Istomin in six meetings and could not recall that he had played Istomin here in the first round of 2006 – ‘‘I can’t even remember that one’’ – but said he was wary of the fact that Istomin had upset Djokovic ‘‘a couple of years ago’’.
‘‘Of course, I know all about his big upset a couple of years ago against Novak. So naturally, I will not underestimate anybody and just because I’ve been playing well in the Hopman Cup doesn’t mean this is going to happen again here as well. So I’ve just got to fight for that good level from the get go here in the beginning.’’

Source:https://www.smh.com.au/sport/tennis...urray-s-early-retirement-20190112-p50r0z.html
 
Roger Federer has been ‘‘hit hard’’ by the imminent retirement of his rival Andy Murray, but disputed the view that Murray had been unlucky to play in the same era as Federer, Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic.

Federer said Murray had much to be proud of, pointing to his (three) major titles, reaching world No. 1 (2016) and Olympic golds, while expressing some ‘‘shock’’ that the Scot would be finishing up this year, as Murray said in an emotional media conference on Friday.

‘‘It hit me hard,’’ Federer told the Sunday Age in an exclusive interview. ‘‘Of course, I’ve seen Andy struggling you know with his hip and with his fitness for quite some time now.

‘‘You want somebody to go there and feel like he’s happy to retire. The problem is it’s not his decision, it’s the body’s decision and that naturally hurts.’’

Federer did not concur with the widespread view – voiced since Murray’s surprise announcement that he aimed to retire after Wimbledon, if not much sooner, due to his chronic hip problem – that the Scot had been unlucky in the timing of his career.

‘‘I mean, he won Wimbledon, he won the Oympics, became world No. 1. Is that unlucky? I don’t know. I always said you can have great careers, you can have great careers side by side. Maybe from Aussie stand point, yes he’s been unlucky because he made five finals here [in Melbourne] and never won one. But that’s why I think he will also be even more loved you know because he maybe didn’t make it here.

‘‘But I don’t think he will say or that we should say that he’s been unlucky, I think he’s worked extremely hard and when he got to world No. 1 or he won all those big event that he did, totally deserved them ... he put in the workload and he’s an extremely talented player as well.’’
Federer said Murray had given his all and ‘‘made Scotland proud’’. ‘‘I feel like he left everything out there. There was never any doubts there. And I think he should be very proud even though he was extremely sad in the press conference and you know, you don’t want to see that.’’

Federer told the Sunday Age he was well-placed for this campaign, with no fitness issues, but he declared that this Open was “totally up for grabs’’ and he did not think he was entitled to favouritism.
‘‘Last year I also came in not expecting to defend again. In a way I also feel again, you know, it’s totally up for grabs again. I don’t think you can put me massive favourite. If you can put anybody as a big favourite, I think it would be Novak – or Rafa if he’s, you know, fully fully fit. You know, but only the first couple of matches will show where his level’s at. To my side, I just hope to be in the mix when it comes down the stretch.’’
Federer has often been asked for his view of Australia’s enigmatic talent Nick Kyrgios and his reply this time reflected that he was sick of fielding questions about the 23-year-old and that the ball was entirely in Kyrgios’ court.

‘‘I get asked every time and I’m tired of answering the question. I like Nick, look at the end of the day and I think he’s a wonderful player and he’s got incredible shots and he knows that, we all know that. It’s just a question of how much he wants it. It’s up to him to decide how he wants to go about it.’’

Federer has never lost to his first round opponent Denis Istomin in six meetings and could not recall that he had played Istomin here in the first round of 2006 – ‘‘I can’t even remember that one’’ – but said he was wary of the fact that Istomin had upset Djokovic ‘‘a couple of years ago’’.
‘‘Of course, I know all about his big upset a couple of years ago against Novak. So naturally, I will not underestimate anybody and just because I’ve been playing well in the Hopman Cup doesn’t mean this is going to happen again here as well. So I’ve just got to fight for that good level from the get go here in the beginning.’’

Source:https://www.smh.com.au/sport/tennis...urray-s-early-retirement-20190112-p50r0z.html
these are some really nice words about murray and tbh I am really glad roger said murrays records on their own are great. Its somewhat annoying imo to constantly say Murray what Murray achieved was amazing given the era he played in, almost backhanded in some way because reality is no matter how you look at it 3 slam, and no.1 is great
 
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