Federer News

Steady as He Goes: Roger Federer on Success, Staying Power and 20 Years at the French Open
By Christopher Clarey

CHUR, Switzerland — Roger Federer had just finished his soup and was dubious.
“Come on!” he said. “Nobody else left?”
No, not a soul.
Of the 128 players who took part in the 1999 French Open singles tournament, Federer is the last one still playing singles on tour.
That French Open was Federer’s first Grand Slam event. He was 17 years old, wore a ball cap backward on court and still had difficulty keeping his temper in check. Even though he was Swiss, not French, and had lost in the first round of the junior event the year before, the French tournament officials had decided, after considerable debate, to give him a precious wild card into the main draw based on his clear potential.
His opponent on May 25, 1999, was Patrick Rafter, the net-rushing Australian then ranked No. 3 in the world. Though Federer did come out swinging and win the first set, he struggled to win games after that, losing, 5-7, 6-3, 6-0, 6-2, in the sunshine on Court Suzanne Lenglen.

“After the first set, he got the hang of how I play and he, like, sliced and diced me,” Federer said in an interview last month.

I was one of about 10,000 in attendance that afternoon 20 years ago, and though many of the courts used in 1999 at the French Open no longer exist, Lenglen still stands.
So does Federer, now ranked No. 3 at age 37 and ready to return to the French Open for the first time since 2015.
Logically, there has been speculation that this is a farewell visit, one more chance to commune with the unpredictable Roland Garros public that has treated him much better than it has treated most through the decades.

But Federer, who won his lone French title in 2009, is quick to quash that line of thinking.
“I usually go one year at a time, and the other day I just spoke with my team about the clay-court season next year,” he said. “I was asking, ‘Anybody have any ideas yet?’”
Knowing Federer’s orderly ways, it is difficult to imagine that he has not planned his retirement down to the last gold watch. But he insisted that he was handling the process as he would an extended rally: trusting his instincts.
“I heard rumors that people said I definitely wanted to play the Tokyo Olympics next year, and that’s when I’m going to retire, but I never said anything like that,” he said. “I really don’t know. I always said, ‘The more I think about retirement, the more I am already retired.’ People ask me, what are you going to do next? And I say, ‘Well, in a way I’m not quite sure, because I feel if I plan everything for my post-career, I feel like I’m halfway there.’ I think it would not affect my performance per se, but maybe my overall desire to want to do well.”

Performance has not been a problem for Federer in 2019; he has won titles in Dubai and Miami and reached the final in Indian Wells, Calif. His return to clay-court tennis has been encouraging if not yet triumphant. He lost in three sets to the clay-court terror Dominic Thiem in the quarterfinals of the Madrid Open and then withdrew from the Italian Open with a sore leg after saving two match points in his round-of-16 victory over Borna Coric.
Federer’s goal was to protect his chances of playing in Paris, and after several days of practice at Roland Garros, he appears ready to slide in earnest on the red clay that he finds closer to “powder” than the grittier clay used elsewhere on tour.
His last match in Paris was a straight-set quarterfinal defeat to his Swiss compatriot Stan Wawrinka in 2015. He actually came back to Roland Garros in 2016, but withdrew before the tournament with knee and back problems. He skipped the 2017 and 2018 events to focus on other priorities.

But he is now back where his Grand Slam journey began. Other players his age are still on tour, including his fellow 37-year-old Feliciano López, who will play in his 69th straight Grand Slam singles tournament in Paris. But Federer’s wild card put him ahead of the curve in 1999, and to rewatch his match with Rafter — when human net-cord judges were still deployed instead of electronic sensors — is to remember how far he has come.

The easy power, variety and fluidity already were evident, as was his signature penchant for letting his gaze linger on the point of contact after striking the ball. But if the manner looks familiar, the manners do not. He was volatile and occasionally volcanic then: yelling “Come on!” to berate himself rather than encourage himself and even chucking his racket after getting passed by Rafter early in the third set.
“And this was probably very controlled me in that ’99 match,” Federer said. “Imagine me not against Rafter, not on Lenglen and on some outside court. I was probably much more explosive because the respect for the place wouldn’t be the same. There, I knew it was like live TV, 12,000 people. So it was: ‘O.K., keep it together Roger. Keep it together.’ So I was on my best behavior in that match!”
Federer was working with the Switzerland-based sports psychologist Chris Marcolli to manage his emotions.
“I started to feel uncomfortable after a while when you are on TV like this, and I’d see the highlights,” Federer said. “You throw the racket in the corner and you are so frustrated and disappointed, and it’s just a bad look. And I said: ‘It just looks stupid and silly. Let’s get your act together a little bit.’ It took me a long time, but it was interesting.”
Federer also realized that his emotional displays were draining his energy, but even so, he said that he still likes seeing today’s youngsters lose control from time to time.
“Instead of telling them, ‘Buddy, clean it up!’ I’m happy the guy shows it,” Federer said. “I don’t want to see robots all around. I don’t want to see the 18-year-old guy like super, super composed already. When you have a guy who is finally a little lively, let him be and then eventually he will channel it anyway.”

Federer undeniably found his groove, winning a record 20 Grand Slam singles titles and 81 other singles titles. He surely would have won more than once at Roland Garros if not for the emergence of Rafael Nadal. Five years his junior, Nadal is 5-0 against Federer at the French Open, which Nadal has won a record 11 times.

“The problem was Rafa came alive, and Rafa was Rafa,” Federer said, as if he were describing climate change, or the tides.

Though another French Open title for Federer remains unlikely, he takes pride in being back in the arena. Of the 127 other men who played singles in 1999, his former rival Lleyton Hewitt is the only one who is still playing occasionally on tour, and that is only in doubles. While the Norwegian Christian Ruud was in the draw with Federer in 1999, the only Ruud in the draw this year is Christian’s 20-year-old son, Casper.
Why has Federer endured when so many others have not? He credits his long-term plan with the fitness coach Pierre Paganini to “protect longevity” by “not chasing all the appearance fees and not going to all the smaller events” and by committing to two extended training blocks during the year.

Already back in 2004, when I became world No. 1, that was my mind-set,” Federer said. “I made the decision early, and I think that’s why I am still here today. I never fell out of love with the sport.”
His natural talent and body type also played a role in extending his career.
“Maybe where my talent has helped me a little bit is to shape and get the technique I have today that puts maybe less wear and tear on me,” he said. “But I think I’ve earned it with my schedule and my buildup and maybe my mental side of the game as well.
“As much as I take things very serious, I am very laid back, so I can really let go very quickly. I truly believe this is a secret for a lot of the players and for the young guys is to be able, when you leave the site, to say: ‘O.K., I’m going to leave it behind. I still know I’m a professional tennis player, but I’m relaxing. I’m doing it my way, whatever helps me decompress.’”

Federer stopped for a moment and clenched his left fist tightly across the table.
“Because if you are constantly like this,” he said, showing the fist. “That’s when you burn out."

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/24/sports/roger-federer-french-open.html
 
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This is without context, lol.

Potro was a non factor going into the 2017 USO and not considered a tough draw.

Djokovic for the 2019 AO must be a joke. Might as well mention Stan too.

Now, Potro of course ended up a good opponent, but so do many other non big names, which isnt what you made this about.
Del Potro was ranked 28 the time he payed USO, and the whole season lost mostly to the players which were in form and in top 10: Dimitrov, who won Cincy where Del Po lost to him and also in Shanghai, Raonic, Murray and Nishikori and mostly of the big 3 3 times to Federer, 3 times to Djokovic, once vs Nadal.

:cool:
 

Ann

Hall of Fame
This is without context, lol.

Potro was a non factor going into the 2017 USO and not considered a tough draw.

Djokovic for the 2019 AO must be a joke. Might as well mention Stan too.

Now, Potro of course ended up a good opponent, but so do many other non big names, which isnt what you made this about.
Rafa is my 2nd favorite player and I want him to win the FO (because I know Roger won't) but if you have any honesty in your soul you will admit that Rafa's draw for this tourney is beyond a cakewalk and it tends to always be that way. So if on the Fed Fan section of this site people want to complain about the B.S. draws then you should probably just be silent.
 
Since Feds comeback he has been dealt some ridicolously tough draws at slams, baring Wimbledon last year...

AO17 - Berdych - Nishikori - Murray - Wawrinka - Djokovic(Nadal)
W17 - Dimitrov - Raonic - Djokovic - Murray/Nadal(Cilic)
USO17 - del Potro - Nadal (back2back whilst injured)
AO18 - del Potro - Djokovic - Nadal
USO18 - Djokovic - Nishikori - Nadal
AO19 - Tsitsipas - Cilic - Nadal - Djokovic

*in bold is what his actual route was/had to be to win the tournament.

Now of course he didn't have to face Nadal at Wimbledon or the USO (he would have if he'd taken those set points in the third vs delPo), or Djokovic-Nadal at the Australian last year (their fault, not Feds). But his actual route for these slams has been tough, and would have been both times at the US for example (had he beaten Millman and del Potro). I would love an easy draw for a change, take those 720 points or so and onto grass.
Actually, his Wimbledon 17 draw wasn't easy at all. Fedr made it look so.
 
The number 1 seed gets Hurkacz & Simon in the 1st 3 rounds & the number 2 seed gets 2 qualifiers in a row. Big LAWL!
Neither did he get any of better performing young guns nor did he get any player who is currently on a hot streak. Its like all roadblocks were carefully taken out for a clean pass through the draw. Its very obvious that it’s not so random.
 
one hand, i'm always happy to see fed play in any capacity, on the other hand i'm like god damn it, for the past 3 years i didnt have to stress about it and now that fed is back on play, the anxiety in watching him is coming back. just please dont hurt yourself.

i actually like that he did admit it was precautionary.
 
Yes, it is absolutely time for a Fed cakewalk! Brutal has definitely been the trend. Time for the draw gods to shine on Fed for a few.
I'd like that easy draw for Wimbledon please.

Btw, I didn't use to know this but the term "cake walk" has its roots in slavery.

https://www.stuffyoushouldknow.com/...-origin-of-an-unwittingly-prejudiced-term.htm

Not sure that many people know this and would therefore funds it offensive, but I don't think I shall use it again. Anyone have a good suggestion for an alternative? "P1ss easy" doesn't quite have the same ring to it.

(Sent from my mobile phone.)
 
I'd like that easy draw for Wimbledon please.

Btw, I didn't use to know this but the term "cake walk" has its roots in slavery.

https://www.stuffyoushouldknow.com/...-origin-of-an-unwittingly-prejudiced-term.htm

Not sure that many people know this and would therefore funds it offensive, but I don't think I shall use it again. Anyone have a good suggestion for an alternative? "P1ss easy" doesn't quite have the same ring to it.

(Sent from my mobile phone.)
I have never heard that! Let's just say "a walk in the park" then... And, yes, if we can have one, Wimby would be an excellent time for it :)
 
I'd like that easy draw for Wimbledon please.

Btw, I didn't use to know this but the term "cake walk" has its roots in slavery.

https://www.stuffyoushouldknow.com/...-origin-of-an-unwittingly-prejudiced-term.htm

Not sure that many people know this and would therefore funds it offensive, but I don't think I shall use it again. Anyone have a good suggestion for an alternative? "P1ss easy" doesn't quite have the same ring to it.

(Sent from my mobile phone.)
oh wow...did not know this. thanks for posting.
 
Rafa is my 2nd favorite player and I want him to win the FO (because I know Roger won't) but if you have any honesty in your soul you will admit that Rafa's draw for this tourney is beyond a cakewalk and it tends to always be that way. So if on the Fed Fan section of this site people want to complain about the B.S. draws then you should probably just be silent.
Ann, it makes no sense to claim that any player's draw tends to be a cakewalk "always". That's illogical. Over a career good and bad draws are going to even out. That's true for Nadal, for Fed, for any top player. If Nadal's draws, over a career, look to be easier, as they probably do on clay, that's only because he is such a monster on clay. Like Rafa has been my 2nd favorite, although to be honest perhaps not so much now, and I still always pull for Fed.

The inconvenient truth for some people is that the first few rounds of majors have always been weak competition, on average, which is why you see such lopsided scores in such matches. And, by the way, it's also true that nothing in majors is always easy, since in any round you can have some desperate player seeking to make a comeback or establish early cred play a red-line match and nearly - or in some cases actually - take out a top player.
 
Ann, it makes no sense to claim that any player's draw tends to be a cakewalk "always". That's illogical. Over a career good and bad draws are going to even out. That's true for Nadal, for Fed, for any top player. If Nadal's draws, over a career, look to be easier, as they probably do on clay, that's only because he is such a monster on clay. Like Rafa has been my 2nd favorite, although to be honest perhaps not so much now, and I still always pull for Fed.

The inconvenient truth for some people is that the first few rounds of majors have always been weak competition, on average, which is why you see such lopsided scores in such matches. And, by the way, it's also true that nothing in majors is always easy, since in any round you can have some desperate player seeking to make a comeback or establish early cred play a red-line match and nearly - or in some cases actually - take out a top player.

i certainly dont think nadal always gets easy draws, although it does feel like it over the last few years, but yes that is mostly ******** and groaning and yes rafa is a beast on clay so most draws look easy, but this year to call it your typical easy draw is an understatement imo. its not like he hasn't been pushed in the past, even during some of his peak years. i dont think you can argue against the fact that he did avoid anyone who has been able to push him on this surface (yes its very few), over the past few years.
 
Ann, it makes no sense to claim that any player's draw tends to be a cakewalk "always". That's illogical. Over a career good and bad draws are going to even out. That's true for Nadal, for Fed, for any top player. If Nadal's draws, over a career, look to be easier, as they probably do on clay, that's only because he is such a monster on clay. Like Rafa has been my 2nd favorite, although to be honest perhaps not so much now, and I still always pull for Fed.

The inconvenient truth for some people is that the first few rounds of majors have always been weak competition, on average, which is why you see such lopsided scores in such matches. And, by the way, it's also true that nothing in majors is always easy, since in any round you can have some desperate player seeking to make a comeback or establish early cred play a red-line match and nearly - or in some cases actually - take out a top player.
It is enough for me that I can predict with a high level of success how parts of the draw will pan out based on certain assumptions to know that noone is going to such pains if it was "the same"/irrelevant. The assumption that it "evens out" in the long run is not very relevant either: when the history is influenced it is irrelevant that a player will get a puff draw in some "other" tournament.

:cool:
 
Well, people see "Q" and they automatically think easy draw. But let's not forget that Brown was a qualifier when he beat Rafa on grass in 2015.

In 2015 Symczek took Rafa to 5 at the AO. Gulbis took him to 3 sets in Rome in 2013 and won the first set with a breadstick. Also took him to 3 sets in IW in 2013. And so on. I had to look these up. Don't remember any of them. I don't remember what happened last week!

Also, remember that qualifiers can be red hot but not yet highly ranked, and they can be way more in form than higher ranked players who get in the main draw but who are not necessarily any good on clay. RG's seeding is and always has been highly illogical. Nadal has only be the #1 see three times and again is #2 this year.

Here's another example of the unpredictability of it all. In 2008 Nadal faced a guy named Phau in the 1st round of the USO, another Q. He won in straights, but the 1st and 3rd sets were TBs.

In Canada back in 2010 Nadal beat Anderson in the round of 16, a Q, but the 2nd set was a TB that Nadal barely won.

So does Nadal really have the easiest draw?

Maybe. Maybe not...
 
It is enough for me that I can predict with a high level of success how parts of the draw will pan out based on certain assumptions to know that noone is going to such pains if it was "the same"/irrelevant. The assumption that it "evens out" in the long run is not very relevant either: when the history is influenced it is irrelevant that a player will get a puff draw in some "other" tournament.

:cool:
So, your assumption is that it's rigged?
 

Ann

Hall of Fame
Ann, it makes no sense to claim that any player's draw tends to be a cakewalk "always". That's illogical. Over a career good and bad draws are going to even out. That's true for Nadal, for Fed, for any top player. If Nadal's draws, over a career, look to be easier, as they probably do on clay, that's only because he is such a monster on clay. Like Rafa has been my 2nd favorite, although to be honest perhaps not so much now, and I still always pull for Fed.

The inconvenient truth for some people is that the first few rounds of majors have always been weak competition, on average, which is why you see such lopsided scores in such matches. And, by the way, it's also true that nothing in majors is always easy, since in any round you can have some desperate player seeking to make a comeback or establish early cred play a red-line match and nearly - or in some cases actually - take out a top player.
Gary, the "always" is for the past X number of years at RG and it is logical when you look at the draws.

I'm not going to debate this with anyone as long as I'm still able to read.
 
So, your assumption is that it's rigged?
I made a thread about Thiem's draw based on that assumption and nailed the last three round opponents (Nadal/Djokovic/Del Po), the alternative of the QF opponent (FAA) and the one that I didn't nail in R4 (predicted Schwarzman) was replaced by similarly logical choice of similar strength (Monfils). The first three rounds were just a suggestions for the hardest possible draw, so they didn't quite materialise, but the R3 opponent (Cuevas) that replaced my pick there (FAA) is also very solid. Same for the R1 opponent, who, for his level, has a spectacular clay court season so far.

You can see my thread about Thiem's draw:

https://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/index.php?threads/rg-2019-thiems-most-difficult-draw.643892/

and my other thread about the RG final. In point 5 is the relevant part:

https://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/ind...al-wont-be-between-nadal-and-djokovic.643803/

The premise I started from is that if the player that is the biggest thread to the marquee matchup of the tournament is identifiable, resources are thrown at him , so that maximal profit is made from his participation. Usually the difficulty is with identifying which is the marquee match up, and who is the threat. This year's RG was easy, as both are pretty clear.

:cool:
 

NKDM

Professional
Ann, it makes no sense to claim that any player's draw tends to be a cakewalk "always". That's illogical. Over a career good and bad draws are going to even out. That's true for Nadal, for Fed, for any top player. If Nadal's draws, over a career, look to be easier, as they probably do on clay, that's only because he is such a monster on clay. Like Rafa has been my 2nd favorite, although to be honest perhaps not so much now, and I still always pull for Fed.

The inconvenient truth for some people is that the first few rounds of majors have always been weak competition, on average, which is why you see such lopsided scores in such matches. And, by the way, it's also true that nothing in majors is always easy, since in any round you can have some desperate player seeking to make a comeback or establish early cred play a red-line match and nearly - or in some cases actually - take out a top player.
I think you should be banned for being too reasonable for this forum.
 
Just realised this is the first year Fedal has been drawn in the same half since their initial RG encounter in 2005(!).

The other years where it was possible for Fedal semis:

2011: (1. Nadal 2. Djokovic) #3 Fed in Novak's half
2012: (1. Djokovic 2. Nadal) #3 Fed in Novak's half
2013: (1. Djokovic 2. Federer) #3 Rafa in Novak's half
2014: (1. Nadal 2. Djokovic) #4 Fed in Novak's half
2015: (1. Djokovic 2. Federer) #6 Rafa in Novak's quarter
 
Gary, the "always" is for the past X number of years at RG and it is logical when you look at the draws.

I'm not going to debate this with anyone as long as I'm still able to read.
To be honest, I never thought about this. I just assumed that with Rafa he's such a beast that it doesn't really matter who you throw at him when he's in top gear. That said, I have a profound distrust of human beings, especially money-making organizations. I don't know how people would rig draws without eventually getting caught, but if they can, they will. It's just like doping. I have the same assumption. If top players can figure out how to bend the rules without getting caught, I'm sure they will. All of them.
 
Evans on training with Federer:
"I was pretty surprised with how simple a lot of the drills were and it was a bit of an eye-opener comparing what's being done in our country to what the greatest tennis player of all time does"

"He was so down to earth off the court, it was a bit surreal sometimes how we ate lunch and stuff – he didn't hide away or anything. He just basically did normal stuff, he didn't change his day because people were going to come up to him."

"It was pretty relaxed and then when we were hitting it was strictly business. Then we would sit down and talk, it was just very normal. When I say he was strictly business some people think he can be difficult, but he was talkative still."

 
People watching Federer practicing at RG these days say he's in great form. He's been toying with Schwartzman, Seppi and other players.
He was very aggressive in his first sets played on clay in every match other than against Coric (the second match of the day) and all were very well played and all displayed:

—Serve yielded plus situations for the FH which he hit authoritatively
—Hit some BH drive lasers with which he finished off points, something that’s new
—Volleyed really well
—Movement was averageish and then declined from there

He really destroyed Thiem and Monfils in those first sets and displayed some really good power against Sousa. He just won’t have the stamina against better opponents innlater rounds.
 

Hitman

Bionic Poster
Just realised this is the first year Fedal has been drawn in the same half since their initial RG encounter in 2005(!).

The other years where it was possible for Fedal semis:

2011: (1. Nadal 2. Djokovic) #3 Fed in Novak's half
2012: (1. Djokovic 2. Nadal) #3 Fed in Novak's half
2013: (1. Djokovic 2. Federer) #3 Rafa in Novak's half
2014: (1. Nadal 2. Djokovic) #4 Fed in Novak's half
2015: (1. Djokovic 2. Federer) #6 Rafa in Novak's quarter
It's like everything is coming full circle.
 

NBP

Hall of Fame
The Dream...

1R - Sonego in 3
2R - Otte in 3
3R - Berrettini in 3
4R - Gassed Kohlschreiber from 5 setter with Schwartzman in 3, maybe 2 with retirement
QF - Tiafoe in 3
SF - 30 degree heat, Nadal gassed with 5 setter with Glasskori:-D, Fed in 4 with two breadsticks
F - Gassed del Potro who beats Djokovic 7-6 in the fifth, revenge for USO09
 
The Dream...

1R - Sonego in 3
2R - Otte in 3
3R - Berrettini in 3
4R - Gassed Kohlschreiber from 5 setter with Schwartzman in 3, maybe 2 with retirement
QF - Tiafoe in 3
SF - 30 degree heat, Nadal gassed with 5 setter with Glasskori:-D, Fed in 4 with two breadsticks
F - Gassed del Potro who beats Djokovic 7-6 in the fifth, revenge for USO09
Where do we sign!?1!1!!
 
Seriously though, Fed must straight set his way throughout the first week before facing Tsits eventually in the quarters.
I hear what you mean, but I think as long as he doesn't go 5 sets, he'll be ok. ;)

edit: Also, Tsits has a tough 1R match against Marterer. Tsits is the much better player this year, but Marterer was making a bit of a splash about 1-2yrs ago. Marterer's been slumping a bit lately, but he's only a couple of years older (23yo) and looked to be a future star not long ago. Marterer is a lefty at 6'3", and we know how devastated Tsits was against a better playing Nadal at AO19. Also, Marterer made it to 4R of RG18. This match is not a given for Tsits, IMO.
 
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BeatlesFan

Talk Tennis Guru
The Dream...

1R - Sonego in 3
2R - Otte in 3
3R - Berrettini in 3
4R - Gassed Kohlschreiber from 5 setter with Schwartzman in 3, maybe 2 with retirement
QF - Tiafoe in 3
SF - 30 degree heat, Nadal gassed with 5 setter with Glasskori:-D, Fed in 4 with two breadsticks
F - Gassed del Potro who beats Djokovic 7-6 in the fifth, revenge for USO09
Fedgasmic scenario!
 
The Dream...

1R - Sonego in 3
2R - Otte in 3
3R - Berrettini in 3
4R - Gassed Kohlschreiber from 5 setter with Schwartzman in 3, maybe 2 with retirement
QF - Tiafoe in 3
SF - 30 degree heat, Nadal gassed with 5 setter with Glasskori:-D, Fed in 4 with two breadsticks
F - Gassed del Potro who beats Djokovic 7-6 in the fifth, revenge for USO09
Not happening.

No tiebreaks in the 5th.
 
Your reading comprehension sucks.

My post makes absolutely no mention of Rafa's simple draw at the FO.


Again, stop trying to gain cool points. Weak personality.
That's quite the assessment of someone being mistaken in reading between the lines in some posts. I suppose what you've said is indicative of a 'strong' one in some way and any irony suitably crushed into a fine powder to use for further forensics.
 
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