Federer talks racquet history (in German)

Tennis_Hands

Bionic Poster
At the beginning he speaks about his paintjob.

Then comes the question about the raquet change, and how it happens/ed.

Federer says that the main problem is (a lack of) time, because he was always playing, then the (short) off season (that didn't allow for much experimentation), and although one tries new things, he needs to be totally committed, and convinced that he has to change. Here he also says that, because he was not injured for long periods of time, it contributed to the lack of opportunity to try a new raquet, and change eventually earlier!!!

He then speaks about the first time he changed raquet in 2002 from 85 sq in head to 90 sq in head.

He says that the change was necessary, as the bigger head size allowed for better spin-oriented game, was framing the ball more with the smaller raquet, was more difficult to play in windy conditions with it.

Interestingly enough, he says that he didn't want to change directly to 100 or 95 sq in headsizes, so he did it in a step-by-step process, pointing at the next change to his 97 sq in head raquet somewhere in 2013.

He then says that between those changes there were some to his 90 sq in head raquet, with new materials.

The interviewer then suggests that Federer was/is really involved in testing new things, which Federer agreed with, adding that they come to him with new materials and also strings, points out that he started playing with Luxilon and gut in 2002, which proved to be a good combination for the spin game, as he was able to control the ball better, it gave him more security, and allowed him to keep the ball "in".

Then the interviewer says that Federer had to eventually adjust a little more and mentioned Hamburg, to which Federer says that "yes", at the time he had still back problems, and the adjustment (of his game) to the raquet needed a little more time.

Says that he didn't want to attribute all that happened (says to "accuse the raquet") at the time to the raquet change, as the back was still troubling him.

He decided to start Hamburg 2013 with the new raquet, had started training, but was somewhat not confident before Cincinnati and decided to go back to his old raquet till the end of the season, then in December did more testing, they made a few small changes to the raquet, and he started with it in 2014, now able to play good more aggressively again.

Then comes the question about his string savers (small plastic pieces), and why he uses them. Earlier the players did it to not damage the strings as fast.

Federer says that with all gut setup he needed them, because without them he basically went through such setup in 15-20-25 minutes of play, and natural gut is much more expensive than poly strings.

Then he says that with the hybrid setup they thought it might be a good idea, if he has them from the very beginning (after the fresh stringjob), because maybe he could impart a bit more spin with them, because of the angular profile (of the strings).

Federer also puts cork stringsavers (the three pieces in the throat on the outer side of the hoop, where the natural gut strings pass through the holes of the hoop), in order to keep the natural gut from breaking (says like Sampras and Philippoussis) by high string tensions.

Interestingly, he says that he keeps them for nostalgic reasons, that he also had a vibration dampener that he lost, played without and remained without, because he thought it to be "simpler".

Says he was at first somewhat worried by its absence, but ultimately got used to the feeling without that dampener, a feeling for the raquet that the players always have.

Q:"How many raquets do you have with you when you have a match?"

Federer: "I travel from town to town with 12 in the bag. When I play a tournament like in Stuttgart, for a match I get 6-7 raquets strung per match, and for Wimbledon between 8, and for the final maybe 11."

Q: "Why? Best of 5. It can be relatively long (match)?"

Federer: "Because it can be a long match, and I have some of my raquets with different string tensions. When I don't like one particular higher string tension, I can change (raquet)."

Q: "That means that, when it is hotter, for example, if you play on an indoor court, and it is hotter you can go half a kilo or so higher in your string tension?"

Federer:" Yes, if it is hotter, and I also have different pallets. 26, 26 1/2, 27.3/3/3 or 3/4/3. It depends, but I try to stay at a relatively constant size throughout an entire tournament. Of course, that also varies from place to place."

Q: "Do you pre-stretch your strings?"

Federer:" Yes, we do the pre-stretch, so that the string doesn't lose tension, although I play relatively short time with a single raquet (20-30 minutes), and then I change, so with me it does not come to that, but it is interesting that I also am used to that, and it works very well for me."

Q:" How many raquets do you use in an year?"

Federer: "60-70. Grass season, earlier the clay season (hopefully next year again), the different HC parts of the season. Yes 5x12, so 60. Nowadays I change raquets, because I must.

Why the whole thing with the raquet change: because the longer one uses a raquet, the more he wears it out. The more a player plays with it, the flexier it gets, and when he changes to a new one it has a completely different feel. So, from time to time, buy yourself, please, a new raquet. Many people have last bought a raquet 7-8 years ago, but I think it is worth it to buy a new one, so that the old one doesn't lose its inherent properties."

The interviewer says that Sampras was very sensible to the cosmetic of his raquet (how the paintjob impacts the playing characteristics of the raquet), and asks how sensitive is Federer to that.

Federer says that not as much as Sampras, but says that he can feel small differences how the raquet plays with the so called "elastic paint"

That is not a full translation, but gives the idea of what Federer said.

Also, in some places I use "raquet" and "frame" interchangeably.

:cool:
 
Last edited:

NE1for10is?

Semi-Pro
Fascinating interview. It's also interesting that he can notice the difference between the flexible paint job and where the racket has the shiny less flexible white stripe.
 

mikeler

Moderator
At the beginning he speaks about his paintjob.

Then comes the question about the raquet change, and how it happens.

Federer says that the main problem is (a lack of) time, because he was always playing, then the (short) off season (that didn't allow for much experimentation), and although one tries new things, he needs to be totally committed, and convinced that he has to change. Here he also says that, because he was not injured for long periods of time, it contributed to the lack of opportunity to try a new raquet, and change eventually earlier!!!

He then speaks about the first time he changed raquet in 2002 from 85 sq in head to 90 sq in head.

He says that the change was necessary as the bigger head size allowed for better spin oriented game, was framing the ball more with the smaller raquet, was more difficult to play in windy conditions.

Interestingly enough, he says that he didn't want to change directly to 100 or 95 sq in headsizes, so he did it in a step by step process, pointing at the next change to his 97 sq in head raquet somewhere in 2013.

He then says that between those changes there were some to his 90 sq in head raquet, with new materials.

The interviewer then suggests that Federer was/is really involved in testing new things, which Federer agreed with, adding that they come to him with new materials and also strings, points out that he started playing with Luxilon and gut in 2002, which proved to be a good combination for the spin game, as he was able to control the ball better, it gave him more security, and allowed him to keep the ball "in".

Then the interviewer says that Federer had to eventually adjust a little more and mentioned Hamburg, to which Federer says that "yes", at the time he had still back problems and the adjustment (of his game) to the raquet needed a little more time.

Says that he didn't want to attribute all that happened (says to "accuse the raquet") at the time to the raquet change, as the back was still troubling him.

He decided to start Hamburg 2013 with the new raquet, had started training, but was somewhat not confident before Cincinnati and decided to go back to his old raquet till the end of the season, then in December did more testing, they made a few small changes to the raquet, and he started with it in 2014, now able to play more aggressively.

Then comes the question about his string savers (small plastic pieces), and why he uses them. Earlier the players did it to not damage the strings as fast.

Federer says that with all gut setup he needed them because without them he basically went through such setup in 15-20-25 minutes of play, and natural gut is much more expensive than poly strings.

Then he says that with the hybrid setup they thought it might be a good idea, if he has them from the very beginning (after the fresh stringjob), because maybe he could impart a bit more spin with them because of the angular profile (of the strings). Federer also puts cork stringsavers (the three pieces in the throat on the outer side of the hoop, where the natural gut strings pass through the holes of the hoop), in order to keep the natural gut from breaking (says like Sampras and Philippoussis) by high string tensions. Interestingly, he says that he keeps them for nostalgic reasons, that he also had a vibration dampener that he lost, played without and remained without, because he thought it to be "simpler", says he was at first somewhat worried by its absence, but ultimately got used to the feeling, which is something that the player get used to, without that dampener.

Q: How many raquets do you have with you when you have a match?

Federer: I travel from town to town with 12 in the bag. When I play a tournament like in Stuttgart, for a match I get 6-7 raquets strung per match, and for Wimbledon between 8, and for the final maybe 11.

Q: Why? Because it can be a long match?

Federer: Because it can be a long match, and I have some of my raquets with different string tensions. When I don't like one particular higher string tension I can change (raquet).

Q: That means that, when it is warmer, for example, if you play on an indoor court, and it is warmer you can go half a kilo or so higher in your string tension?

Federer: Yes, if it is warmer, and I also have different pallets. 26, 26 1/2, 27.3/3/3 or 3/4/3. It depends, but I try to stay at a relatively constant size throughout an entire tournament. Of course, that also varies from place to place.

Q: Do you prestretch your strings?

Federer: Yes, we do the pre stretch, so that the string doesn't lose tension. Although I play relatively short time with a single raquet (20-30 minutes), and then I change, so with me it does not come to that, but it is interesting that I also am used to that, and it works very well for me.

Q: How many raquets do you use in an year?

Federer: 60-70. Grass season, earlier the clay season (hopefully next year again), the different HC parts of the season. Yes 5x12, so 60. Nowadays I change raquets, because I must.

Why the whole thing with the raquet change: because the longer one uses a raquet, the more he wears it out. The more a player plays with it, the flexier it gets, and when he changes to a new one it has completely different feel. So, from time to time, buy yourself please a new raquet. Many people have last bought a raquet 7-8 years ago, but I think it is worth it to buy a new one, so that the (old) one doesn't lose its inner properties.

The interviewer says that Sampras was very sensible to the cosmetic of his raquet (how the paintjob impacts the playing characteristics of the raquet), and and asks how sensitive is Federer to that.

Federer says that not as much as Sampras, but says that he can feel small differences how the raquet plays with the so called "elastic paint"

That is not a full translation, but gives the idea of what Federer said. Also, in some places I use "raquet" and "frame" interchangeably.

:cool:
Thank you for taking the time to summarize the interview.
 

yourname1245

Semi-Pro
Someone tell me this is a wrong translation, it says pallets and size but clearly references tension. The question before and after are about string also. Seems odd, always heard Ron Yu speak of a custom model nothing about pallets.

Q: That means that, when it is warmer, for example, if you play on an indoor court, and it is warmer you can go half a kilo or so higher in your string tension?

Federer: Yes, if it is warmer, and I also have different pallets. 26, 26 1/2, 27.3/3/3 or 3/4/3. It depends, but I try to stay at a relatively constant size throughout an entire tournament. Of course, that also varies from place to place
 

flanker2000fr

Professional
At the beginning he speaks about his paintjob.

Then comes the question about the raquet change, and how it happens.

Federer says that the main problem is (a lack of) time, because he was always playing, then the (short) off season (that didn't allow for much experimentation), and although one tries new things, he needs to be totally committed, and convinced that he has to change. Here he also says that, because he was not injured for long periods of time, it contributed to the lack of opportunity to try a new raquet, and change eventually earlier!!!

He then speaks about the first time he changed raquet in 2002 from 85 sq in head to 90 sq in head.

He says that the change was necessary as the bigger head size allowed for better spin oriented game, was framing the ball more with the smaller raquet, was more difficult to play in windy conditions.

Interestingly enough, he says that he didn't want to change directly to 100 or 95 sq in headsizes, so he did it in a step by step process, pointing at the next change to his 97 sq in head raquet somewhere in 2013.

He then says that between those changes there were some to his 90 sq in head raquet, with new materials.

The interviewer then suggests that Federer was/is really involved in testing new things, which Federer agreed with, adding that they come to him with new materials and also strings, points out that he started playing with Luxilon and gut in 2002, which proved to be a good combination for the spin game, as he was able to control the ball better, it gave him more security, and allowed him to keep the ball "in".

Then the interviewer says that Federer had to eventually adjust a little more and mentioned Hamburg, to which Federer says that "yes", at the time he had still back problems and the adjustment (of his game) to the raquet needed a little more time.

Says that he didn't want to attribute all that happened (says to "accuse the raquet") at the time to the raquet change, as the back was still troubling him.

He decided to start Hamburg 2013 with the new raquet, had started training, but was somewhat not confident before Cincinnati and decided to go back to his old raquet till the end of the season, then in December did more testing, they made a few small changes to the raquet, and he started with it in 2014, now able to play more aggressively.

Then comes the question about his string savers (small plastic pieces), and why he uses them. Earlier the players did it to not damage the strings as fast.

Federer says that with all gut setup he needed them because without them he basically went through such setup in 15-20-25 minutes of play, and natural gut is much more expensive than poly strings.

Then he says that with the hybrid setup they thought it might be a good idea, if he has them from the very beginning (after the fresh stringjob), because maybe he could impart a bit more spin with them because of the angular profile (of the strings). Federer also puts cork stringsavers (the three pieces in the throat on the outer side of the hoop, where the natural gut strings pass through the holes of the hoop), in order to keep the natural gut from breaking (says like Sampras and Philippoussis) by high string tensions. Interestingly, he says that he keeps them for nostalgic reasons, that he also had a vibration dampener that he lost, played without and remained without, because he thought it to be "simpler", says he was at first somewhat worried by its absence, but ultimately got used to the feeling, which is something that the player get used to, without that dampener.

Q: How many raquets do you have with you when you have a match?

Federer: I travel from town to town with 12 in the bag. When I play a tournament like in Stuttgart, for a match I get 6-7 raquets strung per match, and for Wimbledon between 8, and for the final maybe 11.

Q: Why? Because it can be a long match?

Federer: Because it can be a long match, and I have some of my raquets with different string tensions. When I don't like one particular higher string tension I can change (raquet).

Q: That means that, when it is warmer, for example, if you play on an indoor court, and it is warmer you can go half a kilo or so higher in your string tension?

Federer: Yes, if it is warmer, and I also have different pallets. 26, 26 1/2, 27.3/3/3 or 3/4/3. It depends, but I try to stay at a relatively constant size throughout an entire tournament. Of course, that also varies from place to place.

Q: Do you prestretch your strings?

Federer: Yes, we do the pre stretch, so that the string doesn't lose tension. Although I play relatively short time with a single raquet (20-30 minutes), and then I change, so with me it does not come to that, but it is interesting that I also am used to that, and it works very well for me.

Q: How many raquets do you use in an year?

Federer: 60-70. Grass season, earlier the clay season (hopefully next year again), the different HC parts of the season. Yes 5x12, so 60. Nowadays I change raquets, because I must.

Why the whole thing with the raquet change: because the longer one uses a raquet, the more he wears it out. The more a player plays with it, the flexier it gets, and when he changes to a new one it has completely different feel. So, from time to time, buy yourself please a new raquet. Many people have last bought a raquet 7-8 years ago, but I think it is worth it to buy a new one, so that the (old) one doesn't lose its inner properties.

The interviewer says that Sampras was very sensible to the cosmetic of his raquet (how the paintjob impacts the playing characteristics of the raquet), and and asks how sensitive is Federer to that.

Federer says that not as much as Sampras, but says that he can feel small differences how the raquet plays with the so called "elastic paint"

That is not a full translation, but gives the idea of what Federer said. Also, in some places I use "raquet" and "frame" interchangeably.

:cool:
Very good translation. Well done, and thanks for taking the time to do this.

Very instructive, especially that part on the stringsavers which he puts on every other main to increase the grip on the ball.
 

Tennis_Hands

Bionic Poster
Someone tell me this is a wrong translation, it says pallets and size but clearly references tension. The question before and after are about string also. Seems odd, always heard Ron Yu speak of a custom model nothing about pallets.

Q: That means that, when it is warmer, for example, if you play on an indoor court, and it is warmer you can go half a kilo or so higher in your string tension?

Federer: Yes, if it is warmer, and I also have different pallets. 26, 26 1/2, 27.3/3/3 or 3/4/3. It depends, but I try to stay at a relatively constant size throughout an entire tournament. Of course, that also varies from place to place
I went through this particular part again, and here is the translation almost word for word:

Federer: "...And I don't string every raquet with the same number of kilos....(Interviewer: tell us)..., so that I have a little variation, so that when I don't like one particular size ("Stärke")(makes a gesture as though he is trying the tension of the stringed with the back of his hand), or the tension of the strings, I can still change."

Interviewer: "That means, when it's hotter than you thought, when you play on an indoor court and it is hot, you go half a kilo (of string tension) higher, or...?"

Federer: "... or I feel totally.... I then use raquets with higher string tension. From these I need, from these pallets I simply need a lot more. Sometimes I have even 26, 26 1/2, 27, respectively 3/3/3 or 3/4/3, it depends, but mostly I try to stick to the same size (Stärke) for a whole tournament. Although that varies from place to place, of course"

When I translated it I was somewhat trying to convey what he was saying, without getting into every detail.

You are right that it makes sense that he speaks about the tension of his string(bed) as, depending on conditions, he strings on average just slightly lower that the above mentioned figures.

The difficulty with saying that it is outright so is that:

1) the german word "Stärke" is used for the size as "circumference" (and mostly because circumference can be related to how strong something is, all other things being equal, or just how strong something is depending on size), and also in general to denote some measure.

In this case I didn't put too much effort in deciphering what he meant by it, because right after that he:

2) used the word "pallet".

Now, when you use a word related to sizes, and then talk about pallets, it is easy to just go with the idea that he talks about the sizes of the pallets (it is unfortunate that those figures are close to something else, that can be associated with the raquet).

In this case I assumed that it is a context within a context, and didn't look into it further.

However, "Stärke" can also be, and is used to indicate the gauge of the string, and it makes the most sense in the broader context of the talk about string tensions.

Still, unless Federer uses "pallets" and "frames" interchangeably, it remains unclear.

Maybe someone can ask him at the award ceremony when he has the Wimbledon trophy in his hands again?

:p
 
Last edited:

Bender

G.O.A.T.
The difference in feel between the 2014 and 2016 versions of the RF97A is widely reported even amongst amateur players on these boards, so it comes as no surprise that someone like Fed would definitely notice a difference.

The velvet paint feels a lot more crisp at impact, whereas the previous red and black one felt clubbier (for lack of better words to describe it).

Natural gut + ALU crosses is a fantastic hybrid to use, because it combines the best of both worlds. The natural gut produces easy power and touch, while the crosses provide control and spin. Together, this setup produces immense spin and power because the ALU crosses allow the gut mains to snap back into place, whereas natural gut crosses will get notched together with the mains almost equally, causing the stringbed to lock up very quickly. You get something similar to a lesser extent when you string a racquet with a full set of poly as well after a few hours of play (which is not usually long enough to affect pro players, but it does affect amateurs like us). A locked stringbed reduces spin production, which can provide a secondary explanation as to why string savers are often used by players who choose to play with a full bed of natural gut. They reduce the friction between the mains and crosses and therefore allows more spin to be created.
 

galain

Hall of Fame
Thanks @Tennis_Hands - great job on the translation. I'm so stretched for time right now it would have taken me another week to do. Glad you stepped in. It's an interesting and quite lengthy chat about his gear.
 

mikeler

Moderator
I went through this particular part again, and here is the translation almost word for word:

Federer: "...And I don't string every raquet with the same number of kilos....(Interviewer: tell us)..., so that I have a little variation, so that when I don't like one particular size ("Stärke")(makes a gesture as though he is trying the tension of the stringed with the back of his hand), or the tension of the strings, I can still change."

Interviewer: "That means, when it's hotter than you thought, when you play on an indoor court and it is hot, you go half a kilo (of string tension) higher, or...?"

Federer: "... or I feel totally.... I then use raquets with higher string tension. From these I need, from these pallets I simply need a lot more. Sometimes I have even 26, 26 1/2, 27, respectively 3/3/3 or 3/4/3, it depends, but mostly I try to stick to the same size (Stärke) for a whole tournament. Although that varies from place to place, of course"

When I translated it I was somewhat trying to convey what he was saying, without getting into every detail.

You are right that it makes sense that he speaks about the tension of his string(bed) as, depending on conditions, he strings on average just slightly lower that the above mentioned figures.

The difficulty with saying that it is outright so is that:

1) the german word "Stärke" is used for the size as "circumference" (and mostly because circumference can be related to how strong something is, all other things being equal, or just how strong something is depending on size), and also in general to denote some measure.

In this case I didn't put too much effort in deciphering what he meant by it, because right after that he:

2) used the word "pallet".

Now, when you use a word related to sizes, and then talk about pallets, it is easy to just go with the idea that he talks about the sizes of the pallets (it is unfortunate that those figures are close to something else, that can be associated with the raquet).

In this case I assumed that it is a context within a context, and didn't look into it further.

However, "Stärke" can also be, and is used to indicate the gauge of the string, and it makes the most sense in the broader context of the talk about string tensions.

Still, unless Federer uses "pallets" and "frames" interchangeably, it remains unclear.

Maybe someone can ask him at the award ceremony when he has the Wimbledon trophy in his hands again?

:p
I'll be in Berlin in a week and a half, can't wait. Thank goodness most of the Germans are very accomodating with English.
 

Tennis_Hands

Bionic Poster
I'll be in Berlin in a week and a half, can't wait. Thank goodness most of the Germans are very accomodating with English.
Berlin is a fun place, if you are in the company of locals that know places.

Lots of quality time to be had over there, so enjoy your stay.

Obviously, the communication is a reason for even more fun, so, enjoy that too.

:D
 
The difference in feel between the 2014 and 2016 versions of the RF97A is widely reported even amongst amateur players on these boards, so it comes as no surprise that someone like Fed would definitely notice a difference.

The velvet paint feels a lot more crisp at impact, whereas the previous red and black one felt clubbier (for lack of better words to describe it).

Natural gut + ALU crosses is a fantastic hybrid to use, because it combines the best of both worlds. The natural gut produces easy power and touch, while the crosses provide control and spin. Together, this setup produces immense spin and power because the ALU crosses allow the gut mains to snap back into place, whereas natural gut crosses will get notched together with the mains almost equally, causing the stringbed to lock up very quickly. You get something similar to a lesser extent when you string a racquet with a full set of poly as well after a few hours of play (which is not usually long enough to affect pro players, but it does affect amateurs like us). A locked stringbed reduces spin production, which can provide a secondary explanation as to why string savers are often used by players who choose to play with a full bed of natural gut. They reduce the friction between the mains and crosses and therefore allows more spin to be created.
I was disappointed that Federer didn't get into whether or not (or how) the gradual progression through his racket choices affected his drop shot ...
 

mikeler

Moderator
Berlin is a fun place, if you are in the company of locals that know places.

Lots of quality time to be had over there, so enjoy your stay.

Obviously, the communication is a reason for even more fun, so, enjoy that too.

:D
We have been going there about every other year for over the past decade. During that time, we've made friends with a few of the locals so we have the hang of that city. I just want to visit more cities in Europe but I get overruled every trip by the famiy. I'm not complaining though, life is good when I'm anywhere in Germany.
 
I went through this particular part again, and here is the translation almost word for word:

Federer: "...And I don't string every raquet with the same number of kilos....(Interviewer: tell us)..., so that I have a little variation, so that when I don't like one particular size ("Stärke")(makes a gesture as though he is trying the tension of the stringed with the back of his hand), or the tension of the strings, I can still change."

Interviewer: "That means, when it's hotter than you thought, when you play on an indoor court and it is hot, you go half a kilo (of string tension) higher, or...?"

Federer: "... or I feel totally.... I then use raquets with higher string tension. From these I need, from these pallets I simply need a lot more. Sometimes I have even 26, 26 1/2, 27, respectively 3/3/3 or 3/4/3, it depends, but mostly I try to stick to the same size (Stärke) for a whole tournament. Although that varies from place to place, of course"

When I translated it I was somewhat trying to convey what he was saying, without getting into every detail.

You are right that it makes sense that he speaks about the tension of his string(bed) as, depending on conditions, he strings on average just slightly lower that the above mentioned figures.

The difficulty with saying that it is outright so is that:

1) the german word "Stärke" is used for the size as "circumference" (and mostly because circumference can be related to how strong something is, all other things being equal, or just how strong something is depending on size), and also in general to denote some measure.

In this case I didn't put too much effort in deciphering what he meant by it, because right after that he:

2) used the word "pallet".

Now, when you use a word related to sizes, and then talk about pallets, it is easy to just go with the idea that he talks about the sizes of the pallets (it is unfortunate that those figures are close to something else, that can be associated with the raquet).

In this case I assumed that it is a context within a context, and didn't look into it further.

However, "Stärke" can also be, and is used to indicate the gauge of the string, and it makes the most sense in the broader context of the talk about string tensions.

Still, unless Federer uses "pallets" and "frames" interchangeably, it remains unclear.

Maybe someone can ask him at the award ceremony when he has the Wimbledon trophy in his hands again?

:p
Federer is not talking about pallets, but a "pallette" of string tensions. And then he talks about that he might bring 3 of one tension and 3 of another tension to a match, or 3 of one tension and 4 of another tension and so on.
 
Federer is not talking about pallets, but a "pallette" of string tensions. And then he talks about that he might bring 3 of one tension and 3 of another tension to a match, or 3 of one tension and 4 of another tension and so on.
I concur. When you look at what he's referencing, he's clearly talking about string tensions.
 

Tennis_Hands

Bionic Poster
Federer is not talking about pallets, but a "pallette" of string tensions. And then he talks about that he might bring 3 of one tension and 3 of another tension to a match, or 3 of one tension and 4 of another tension and so on.
Like I already said, I agree that it makes sense that he talks about his string tensions (the 3/4/3 is clearly the number of different raquets, there is no doubt about it) in the context of what he said before and after that part of the interview.

However, the word "Palette" in German is used for both the part of the frame and for "spectrum".

Is "pallette" a word in German?

What you suggest that I suggest (pallets) is clearly wrong, as that is not what he pronounces.

Is the distinction you make based on your interpretation of the context, or you think that you hear something different than what I say that I hear?

:cool:
 
Like I already said, I agree that it makes sense that he talks about his string tensions (the 3/4/3 is clearly the number of different raquets, there is no doubt about it) in the context of what he said before and after that part of the interview.

However, the word "Palette" in German is used for both the part of the frame and for "spectrum".

Is "pallette" a word in German?

What you suggest that I suggest (pallets) is clearly wrong, as that is not what he pronounces.

Is the distinction you make based on your interpretation of the context, or you think that you hear something different than what I say that I hear?

:cool:
Its the context. I am no connaisseur of neither german nor french.
 
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Wouldn't different string thickness be more reasonable translation than grip size? Fed doesn't get blisters and doesn't wear sports tape which would affect how the grip feels, but certainly sometimes grip just feels wrong eventhough it should be the same size, but going from 3 to 4 would be huge change and ealier info about FED grip has been that he is using small grip size compared to his hands size 2. Can anyone still confirm this?

I am very sensitive with the grip size and feel a couple of millimeters difference in circumstance and sometimes it is really difficult to get the grip size spot on when retail raquets and retail overgrips have too big tolerance.
 

Tennis_Hands

Bionic Poster
Wouldn't different string thickness be more reasonable translation than grip size? Fed doesn't get blisters and doesn't wear sports tape which would affect how the grip feels, but certainly sometimes grip just feels wrong eventhough it should be the same size, but going from 3 to 4 would be huge change and ealier info about FED grip has been that he is using small grip size compared to his hands size 2. Can anyone still confirm this?

I am very sensitive with the grip size and feel a couple of millimeters difference in circumstance and sometimes it is really difficult to get the grip size spot on when retail raquets and retail overgrips have too big tolerance.
3/4/3 etc. clearly refers to the different number of differently spec-ed raquets.

It has nothing to do with whatever the actual differences between those raquets are.

Probably Povl Carstensen is correct, but Federer uses some words that can be interpreted as, and/or actually mean different things.

:cool:
 

Alex78

Hall of Fame
Fed says „Paletten“ and this means as much as „stacks“ - of racquets with a given tension (which he calls „Stärke“ („strength“)).
So he says he‘ll need a number (like 3 or 4) of „Paletten“ of racquets with the same
string tension he‘ll take to a match.
 

MisterP

Hall of Fame
Not sure if they were added after you posted this video, but there are subtitles in english now for this entire video. Great find.
 

IowaGuy

Hall of Fame
Fed says he goes through 60 rackets per year.

Let's assume Fed plays somewhere around 900 hours of tennis per year between practice and matches.

900/60 rackets = each racket only gets 15 hours of playtime before it's done!?!

Not sure how many string jobs this is, since he only uses for 30 min or so in a match, and probably not much more in practice before breaking a string, so might be 20 or 30 stringjobs...
 
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