Federers a comment on the heat...

Bartelby

Bionic Poster
Certainly Murray's view is more accurate, but if you're worried about winning the tournament Federer's bravado is useful.
 

RF20Lennon

Legend
Pretty sure it was to fool himself into thinking that so he could ignore it and juts play his game. You have to play mind games with yourself.

Also you have remember Federer trains in Dubai, sometimes during the summer! In that scorching heat so he is probably used to it.
 

Wynter

Legend
I'm just thinking of all these retirements and hewitt and seppi gunning it for 4 and a half hours. Is it a mental case?
 

dh003i

Legend
This is ridiculous. There is barely even the snippet of a quote with no context and you are drawing conclusions? Yes, dealing with the heat is partly a mental thing, because both players have to deal with it.

The idea that it was some kind of jab by Federer is far-fetched and unsupported at best.

Adding a little bit more context to that (but still not much, and against hardly anything that would cause any normal person to lose respect for Federer), here is the actual interview question and his answer:

http://www.ausopen.com/en_AU/news/interviews/2014-01-14/201401141389676366817.html
Q. Much obviously today has been made of the conditions. How would you describe them and how it affected your play, if any, today?
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I thought it was very dry, just hot, you know, stinging sort of sun.

I guess also it depends on who you play, if you're playing a big server, clearly faster conditions. If you're getting into rallies, I guess you'll feel the heat a bit more.

Depending on where you come from it has a bigger effect on you, this type of heat, than maybe humid heat. So it's very personal, and it can become just a very mental thing, you know, and you just can't accept that it's hot.

Just deal with it, because it's the same for both. That's basically it.

Q. You spoke before the tournament about how hard you trained in the offseason. Does that help you if the weather stays like this to cope well?
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I didn't practice in 40 degree heat because that's hard to find, you know, around the world. I did that after the US Open. In Dubai we had 42, 43, so that was warm then.

But like I said, it's just a mental thing. If you've trained hard enough your entire life or the last few weeks and you believe you can do it and come through it, there's no reason.

If you can't deal with it, you throw in the towel. But that's for me.

and a few other interesting Q&A's:

Q. You never seem to be a guy who looks at his coach that much. Is that going to change that much with Stefan?
ROGER FEDERER: Not really. I realize after a set I didn't look up once yet. I better check if he's actually sitting there. I did see them. He was wearing sunglasses. Okay, he is there.

No, I don't look up much. I stopped doing that way back when because just I said you just can't be dependent on these entire looks all the time. Being coached from the sidelines, that's not how I grew up.

I feel like it's like in school, you know, you do your work. At home, you get ready for the test, and then the test, you don't cheat and you try to do your best score.

I see it the same way in tennis. Clearly, you know, when I did look up, I, you know, it's nice seeing him sitting there. Even if he wouldn't be my coach it would be nice. Plus he's in my corner, it's great.

Q. From your perspective, should the roof be closed on Rod Laver when the heat gets this bad?
ROGER FEDERER: No. I think it should always stay open, honestly. That's my opinion.
 

Fedinkum

Legend
Fed was not great handling extreme heat in Brisbane, so he he should know better. However, there is half truth to what he said, once you are on court, no point in complaining external factors you cant change. Adjust your mental state to cope with the circumstances the best you can.
 

Bartelby

Bionic Poster
It's somewhat unfair as some players have courtside shade to stand in while waiting, which makes a huge difference, and some played at night. It becomes a lottery.
 

*Sparkle*

Professional
He's not trying to be derisory of the other players, but it shows he's out of touch with their concerns.

In recent years, he's played a lot of night matches, or at the very least matches where portions of the court are in the shade of the stands. One straightforward day match on a court with areas of shade doesn't make him expert on what it's like to grind it out over four or five sets on an outside court.
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
It's somewhat unfair as some players have courtside shade to stand in while waiting, which makes a huge difference, and some played at night. It becomes a lottery.

If it's an outdoor tourney it's always a lottery, whether it's extreme heat, wind, rain delays. I got sick of the belly-aching after the USO'12 weather because too many were jabbing at Murray's win as a fluke. I'm not adverse to this discussion because the excessive heat could lead to health risks. No tennis player to my knowledge has ever had a trip to the ER bcoz of heavy wind.

If you are prepared for the conditions it's a lot easier to fight through them. That heat training needs to be done with great intensity in the weeks leading up to the AO. Like Fed said, that's hard to find in December but if you go to Dubai say between USO and the Orient swing, that's a smart move and one that will make you mentally stronger in these conditions.
 

dh003i

Legend
Federer trains in Dubai to prepare for the AO. How many other players do that? Perhaps he just prepares better than others.
 

dh003i

Legend
Wasn't Djokovic training one year before the AO someplace that was very cold? Maybe I'm mistaken, but I seem to remember something like that and thinking it was foolish at the time.
 

dh003i

Legend
I will say that players who aren't top players don't make nearly as much money and may have a much harder time travelling to train some-place like Dubai. However, the top players have no such excuse.
 

urundai

Professional
What's wrong with what Fed said? Isn't this the same thing in AO every year?

If you are signing up to play in AO and knowing that it's summer, you should realize what you are signing up for. If they close the roof in two of the arenas, what about the matches scheduled in the other stadiums? Those players should suffer the heat while the top players enjoy the air conditioning? It's just silly.

there is nothing wrong in what Fed said. As a player, you realize the conditions, prepared for it, accept it during the match and just prepare to go with it. If your preparation was in a 70 degree mild weather, that's not going to work.

In my opinion, many of the current top players whine too easily.
 

CCNM

Hall of Fame
Perhaps they should install showers at courtside-like they have at the beach-to help cool these guys & girls down.
 

Sid_Vicious

G.O.A.T.
Andy Murray knows whats up.

Q. How did you find the conditions?
ANDY MURRAY: They were fine. I mean, it's not the easiest conditions I played in. I think, you know, if you were playing on one of the outside courts, in the sun, that would have been worse.

Yeah, I mean, I obviously wasn't on the court for a long time. That's what's very draining about being in conditions like that. I mean, most of the players are conditioned well enough to last in that weather for, you know, a certain amount of time. But doing it for three and a half, four hours is tough to recover from.

Q. Do you think the conditions were safe out there? A couple players collapsed. A ball boy collapsed.
ANDY MURRAY: Yeah, it's definitely something that you maybe have to look at a little bit. As much as it's easy to say the conditions are safe you know, a few people said there's doctors and stuff saying it's fine it only takes one bad thing to happen. And it looks terrible for the whole sport when people are collapsing, ball kids are collapsing, people in the stands are collapsing. That's obviously not great.

And I know when I went out to hit before the match, the conditions like at 2:30, 3:00 were very, very, very tough conditions. Anyone's going to struggle in that heat.

Whether it's safe or not, I don't know. You just got to be very careful these days. There's been some issues in other sports with, you know, players having heart attacks. I don't know exactly why that is. Or collapsing.

In this heat, that's when you're really pushing it to your limits. You don't want to see anything bad happen to anyone.
 

dh003i

Legend
He's not trying to be derisory of the other players, but it shows he's out of touch with their concerns.

Other players don't seem to think so and have voted him the Sportsman of the Year a record number of times. I also seem to remember him pushing for measures that would compensate lower ranked players more.

In recent years, he's played a lot of night matches, or at the very least matches where portions of the court are in the shade of the stands. One straightforward day match on a court with areas of shade doesn't make him expert on what it's like to grind it out over four or five sets on an outside court.

That's true, but see the comments about the issues with any corrective measures.
 

Sid_Vicious

G.O.A.T.
What's wrong with what Fed said? Isn't this the same thing in AO every year?

If you are signing up to play in AO and knowing that it's summer, you should realize what you are signing up for. If they close the roof in two of the arenas, what about the matches scheduled in the other stadiums? Those players should suffer the heat while the top players enjoy the air conditioning? It's just silly.

there is nothing wrong in what Fed said. As a player, you realize the conditions, prepared for it, accept it during the match and just prepare to go with it. If your preparation was in a 70 degree mild weather, that's not going to work.

In my opinion, many of the current top players whine too easily.

They should start scheduling Federer on Court 12 and see what his opinion on the heat is afterwards.

As Hewitt and Murray said yesterday, being big shot players who play on Stadium courts is a luxury. The players who have to play in direct sunlight for 4-5 hours have a much tougher time.
 

Team10

Hall of Fame
Since his comment about the heat, I've certainly lost a lot of respect for him.
http://m.theglobeandmail.com/sports...stralian-open/article16320352/?service=mobile
I just can't wait if he looses a match due to such high temperatures and see what he says. I'm sure he'll eat his own words.

Anyone know of he's going to be playing again during the highest temps in the coming days?

Lol great reasoning, he comments about the heat which wasn't even a big deal AT ALL, and you lost all respect for him. You're a funny one
 
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stringertom

Bionic Poster
They should start scheduling Federer on Court 12 and see what his opinion on the heat is afterwards.

As Hewitt and Murray said yesterday, being big shot players who play on Stadium courts is a luxury. The players who have to play in direct sunlight for 4-5 hours have a much tougher time.

Fed (or for that matter any top 10er) and Court 12...can you say "The Who and Riverfront Coliseum"...a recipe for disaster of a whole lot worse ramifications.
 

Steve0904

Talk Tennis Guru
Since his comment about the heat, I've certainly lost a lot of respect for him.
http://m.theglobeandmail.com/sports...stralian-open/article16320352/?service=mobile
I just can't wait if he looses a match due to such high temperatures and see what he says. I'm sure he'll eat his own words.

Anyone know of he's going to be playing again during the highest temps in the coming days?

I don't agree with Federer here, although another user that posted the whole question put it in a lot better perspective. I'll say that first, but this whole losing a lot of respect thing is so old. Sorry, but it is.

Honestly what does that even mean anymore? Were you a huge fan before, and just now because of this particular comment decided not to be one? Is this something you'll look back on 20 years from now and say that was the day I stopped respecting/liking Federer? You know, you could just say I like Federer, but I disagree, strongly or otherwise. It's not the first controversial comment he's made while playing and it probably won't be the last depending on how long he keeps playing.

Honestly, you wouldn't know but the man killed someone.
 
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tipsa...don'tlikehim!

Talk Tennis Guru
Since his comment about the heat, I've certainly lost a lot of respect for him.
http://m.theglobeandmail.com/sports...stralian-open/article16320352/?service=mobile
I just can't wait if he looses a match due to such high temperatures and see what he says. I'm sure he'll eat his own words.

Anyone know of he's going to be playing again during the highest temps in the coming days?

I went to bed thinking the same yesterday

As usual, Federer... very swiss, very neutral.

Murray is right, people can die, it DOES happen.
 

Bartelby

Bionic Poster
I can't see why men can't have a ten minute break between the third and fourth set, as used to be the case in all weather.
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
I can't see why men can't have a ten minute break between the third and fourth set, as used to be the case in all weather.

We're civilized now...they get to sit on every changeover, unlike the olden days. Also, bathroom breaks and treatment for cramps are no longer verboten.
 

sbengte

G.O.A.T.
It is ok to hate but don't let it completely blind you.

The questions asked to Federer and Murray were different. Federer was asked how the heat specifically affected HIS play and maybe he didn't want to whine about it as his general attitude is to get on with things without complaining.

Murray was specifically asked if the conditions were safe.

Q to Fed :Much obviously today has been made of the conditions. How would you describe them and how it affected your play, if any, today?

When Murray was asked something similar, he too said something about conditioning and didn't go about championing the cause of all players. Only when he was specifically asked if he found it SAFE and about ball boys and players collapsing , did he say the rest of it. You make it sound like Fed was asked about players collapsing and he said it is their problem.

Q. How did you find the conditions?
ANDY MURRAY: They were fine. I mean, it's not the easiest conditions I played in. I think, you know, if you were playing on one of the outside courts, in the sun, that would have been worse.

Yeah, I mean, I obviously wasn't on the court for a long time. That's what's very draining about being in conditions like that. I mean, most of the players are conditioned well enough to last in that weather for, you know, a certain amount of time. But doing it for three and a half, four hours is tough to recover from.

Q. Do you think the conditions were safe out there? A couple players collapsed. A ball boy collapsed.
 

Hood_Man

G.O.A.T.
I don't see the problem. He was asked how the heat affected him, so it shouldn't be that big a surprise that his answer was about himself and his own experiences.

Murray on the other hand was asked a question that directly referenced players collapsing, so his answer reflected that. Reading Sid Vicious' post above, you'll note that Murray didn't comment on the dangerous conditions in his first answer, because the question didn't prompt it. The second one did, and he obliged accordingly.

It's daft to criticise someone for not speaking up about something, when nobody was asking them to.

[EDIT]

Oh look at me trying to be original, only for sbengte to jump in there before me! :evil: :p
 

sbengte

G.O.A.T.
^^ Hood_man, you are a blind fanboy unless you criticize your fav player for things he hasn't even done :twisted:
 

Russeljones

Talk Tennis Guru
Lol at the haters. What an astonishing new angle. He is now responsible for how other people prepare for a tournament they know is going to be hot.
 

Backspin1183

Talk Tennis Guru
very self centered / selfish opinion, as usual

Murray : "not good for the sport, the balls kids, the players"
Federer : "it's mental, i learnt how to deal with it, if you are that bothered, you just quit"
LOL

Very Swiss haha. I like Swiss people though.
And I agree, he doesn't sound like the smartest tennis player in the world. He's more of a very dedicated player who trained hard to be where he is today.
 

raging

Professional
Some interesting posts on Federer but the issue is this:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/tennis/25724815

I think Greg Whyte's comments about spectators in particular are most pertinent because they are not trained for this. The players should be training for a month minimum, in the heat. If they are not doing this, it will be a huge shock, they will not be ready.(like Frank D, he is still angry).

Any comments about fed having an advantage because he plays on the centre court is ridiculous: I have been on centre court as a spectator when the court temperature was 60C. If you sit still in direct sunlight that is so intense: You start to burn, slowly. I burned.

Caveat: I have also played 3 hour plus matches in the heat in Oz but you train for that. These were sometimes on hardcourts with court temperatures at the same as Melbourne Park yesterday . We didn't have any of the icevests, umbrellas, water coolers, trainers that these guys have now.

The only advantage for Federer being on centre court would be if you closed the roof, Fed is against that. He has his point of view.
 
Roger Heaterer will win this AO in the extreme heat over Djokovic/Nadal, hopefully. Somehow, it will be insanely hot in the night matches so he can get it done.
 

namelessone

Legend
I don't really care to comment on what Fed said but AO organizers should take better care of their players. It's one thing to play in heat, it's another for heat to affect the quality of a match. I've played both tennis and football in 39-40 degrees Celsius on natural surfaces and even with proper hydration and such you feel spent after about an hour, sometimes even earlier. You can go longer if you take more breaks but at a regular pace the heat makes things brutal. The guys without caps got heatstroke. And we were amateurs so our level of play wasn't all that sustained, it's quite another thing to be a pro and sustain long rallies in 40+ degress of heat for hours at a time.

Playing on asphalt in such heat must be like playing inside a furnace because the ground gets to around 60 celsius mid day. If you add high humidity to the mix then the situation is even more messed up.

Play is routinely stopped for rain conditions and other extreme weather phenomenon yet some people's response to extreme heat seems to be "man up and play".

Come to think of it, when has play ever been suspended in a big tourney because of extreme heat? I'm trying to think of a situation in recent times but I am drawing a blank. Maybe someone around here can help me out.
 
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D

Deleted member 3771

Guest
Fred is the hardest worker on tour, he does intense 4 hour training sessions in 45degree temps in Dubai, he doesn't give a crap if anyone collapses or dies out there.
 
D

Deleted member 3771

Guest
How does this:

Imply this?


I didn't say the first implied the other, you did.

Feds statement about dealing with the heat just being a mental thing, implies that he thinks he doesn't collapse or die while others do because of his mental toughness. What do you think? Is it because of his mental toughness due to the 4 hour training sessions he endures in the intense Dubai heat?
 

Hood_Man

G.O.A.T.
Play is routinely stopped for rain conditions and other extreme weather phenomenon yet some people's response to extreme heat seems to be "man up and play".

It's a pretty heartless point of view, I agree. I had a mild case of heat exhaustion a few years ago, and I remember feeling a lot of sympathy for Djokovic after he retired from the AO in 2009 as a result. The guy looked terrible, and was clearly suffering far worse than I had (and I felt pretty bad).

The dizziness, nausea, sweating etc was still plenty bad enough when I was back in my bed with the fan on, I can't imagine how Novak would have been expected to keep playing in the Australian summer heat with it.
 
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