Finding it hard to commit to a racquet. Advice?

pico

Semi-Pro
Currently, in my bag I have these:
Prince Phantom 93p
Rf97
head speed pro
Head gravity pro
Technifibre tf40

I hit groundstrokes well with all. My serve is prob best with the rf97. I return best with the 93p. I really dont know how to commit to one since there are other variables too like their strings and tension. Any advice?
 

Ash Tennis

Professional
Currently, in my bag I have these:
Prince Phantom 93p
Rf97
head speed pro
Head gravity pro
Technifibre tf40

I hit groundstrokes well with all. My serve is prob best with the rf97. I return best with the 93p. I really dont know how to commit to one since there are other variables too like their strings and tension. Any advice?
The ability to hold serve is prob most important so stick with the rf
 

emhtennis

Semi-Pro
Which one can you play well with the longest?

All of those are pretty heavy and demanding frames.

If you really want to narrow it down, I would at least put the same string in all of them with minor tension changes based on head size.

You have to start reducing variables to make an accurate assessment.

Sent from my SM-G981U using Tapatalk
 

pico

Semi-Pro
Which one can you play well with the longest?

All of those are pretty heavy and demanding frames.

If you really want to narrow it down, I would at least put the same string in all of them with minor tension changes based on head size.

You have to start reducing variables to make an accurate assessment.

Sent from my SM-G981U using Tapatalk
This would be my next step. I was going to use BHBR in them all n try.
 

pyrokid

Hall of Fame
At a certain point I think you've just gotta go with your gut.

When there's not one that plays obviously better than the others, just pick the one you think is coolest - in my experience you'll have a confidence advantage with it off the bat just because you like it more.

For me this has a lot to do with which one looks best
 
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ollinger

G.O.A.T.
What's all the fuss about commitment here? I assume you're not a touring pro and don't depend on your racquet to make a living, so what difference does it make if you like to switch around quite a bit. Do this in your personal life and you'll find it's a good deal more expensive, however.
 

WYK

Hall of Fame
Currently, in my bag I have these:
Prince Phantom 93p
Rf97
head speed pro
Head gravity pro
Technifibre tf40

I hit groundstrokes well with all. My serve is prob best with the rf97. I return best with the 93p. I really dont know how to commit to one since there are other variables too like their strings and tension. Any advice?
Those last three are basically the same racquet. So you do know what works for you.
 

pyrokid

Hall of Fame
What's all the fuss about commitment here? I assume you're not a touring pro and don't depend on your racquet to make a living, so what difference does it make if you like to switch around quite a bit. Do this in your personal life and you'll find it's a good deal more expensive, however.
I think if your goal is to improve your game, this is detrimental.

A slightly worse frame can be turned into a slightly better frame just because you've played 20 more sets with it. Switching around endlessly misses out on a lot of the familiarity that helps out during big points
 

ollinger

G.O.A.T.
A slightly worse frame can be turned into a slightly better frame just because you've played 20 more sets with it. Switching around endlessly misses out on a lot of the familiarity that helps out during big points
thank you, VIc Braden, I think we all understand the merits of sticking with one frame. Perhaps, though, the OP has the D4 dopamine "novelty gene" and craves a different experience each time he plays. If it's only a game, why not.
 

asifallasleep

Hall of Fame
I have mostly used my rf97 n speed pro lately in matches. I would say i have won the same amt with both.
So your list should only include these two frames (RF97 and Speed Pro), and the most important stroke in tennis is the serve. You state you serve best with the RF97. The RF97 should be your main stick.

IMO forays into the net if you ever partake would be best handled with the RF97. The RF97 i would also think would give you more bailout shots due to it's mass, would probably have the easiest power due to mass and swing weight.

When i glanced at your list before reading any of the thread I felt the RF97 was the best out of the bunch if you could handle it.

After reading your comments and the others I have come to the same conclusion: RF97

You should use the RF97.
 

pyrokid

Hall of Fame
thank you, VIc Braden, I think we all understand the merits of sticking with one frame. Perhaps, though, the OP has the D4 dopamine "novelty gene" and craves a different experience each time he plays. If it's only a game, why not.
I assumed he didn't feel this way because he started a thread asking which racquet to commit to, but maybe I've misread the situation and what he actually wanted was to be told to just keep doing what he's doing
 
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Slowtwitcher

Professional
Did you compare specs on all the frames yet? Maybe when looking at specs you'll find a trend of what works best for you.
 

OldManStan

Rookie
I’ve been on my racquet hunt for several years now and still on going, but sometimes you just have to go with your gut on which one gives you confidence to hit your shots and win the match. I’ve found myself gravitating towards 95-98 sqin. HL racquets with low swing weights and stiffer frames. Still miss my Wilson Pro Staff Six-One 95 BLX. If only I didn’t crack the hoop from a mishit .
 

lim

Semi-Pro
You'll have to make a compromise b/c no stick is going to be great at every aspect..where one is good for certain shots it might suffer at another. A stick with high SW is great for groundies and counterpunching bc they have so much plow but they can negatively affect RHS for your serve or lack touch at the net. That's just one example.

I would go with the one you can trust to execute your weapons with e.g. serve or inside out forehand ect. then use lead to make up for the deficits where ever that is.
 

pico

Semi-Pro
I assumed he didn't feel this way based on the way he started a thread asking which racquet to commit to, but maybe I've misread the situation and what he actually wanted was to be told to just keep doing what he's doing
Busted!!!
 

pico

Semi-Pro
Did you compare specs on all the frames yet? Maybe when looking at specs you'll find a trend of what works best for you.
I do know I like a swingweight between 330 and 340. So I customise racquets accordingly. I almost for the most part play 18 x 20 with the exception of the rf97. Ultimately, it comes down to feel. I like a stiffer feel.
 

PT280 Fan

Rookie
I think it's Okay not to commit as long as the rackets in question are roughly the same in terms of weight, balance, RA, headsize, grip and string tension. I jockey back and forth between Donnay Pro One GTs, Prince Beast 98s and Head Pro Tour 280, but I've weighted them up the same, same string tension and roughly the same balance. I play league doubles tennis in the 4.0 - 4.5 range. If I were to take it to the next step and play singles tournaments, I'd probably commit to one frame only. Seems like your rackets are kind of all over the place.
 

caesar66

Professional
I think it depends how serious you are about tournament play. I’ll probably play high 3.5-low 4.0 tennis for most of my days due to work and infrequency of matches/training. There are TONS of sticks, both current and old, that will allow me to play my game. If I feel like dusting off the I.rads for a match here, or the 6.0 95, there, or something new if I can give it a try will not really matter a whole lot for the once a week hitting session with buddies or local league season. I think I’ve embraced that part of the fun of tennis for me is tweaking equipment here or there.

Now, if you’re a serious tournament player or something I can definitely see the value in settling on one stick and committing. But at the rec level it can be a lot of fun to switch up.
 

Grieeegoorr

Rookie
Try the new Prestige Mid if you truly want to commit to one frame. I have no problem with you bringing a 12 pack stuffed full of different racquets to the court though, as @JOSHL intimated welcome to the club.
 

Slowtwitcher

Professional
Just looked it up. Specs very similar to the Phantom 93p!!!
I really like the 93p and play well with it in your range of SW (4pt HL).

I'm just afraid that as I grow older it'll be harder and harder to play with a mid-size racquet.
 

joohan

Hall of Fame
I assumed he didn't feel this way because he started a thread asking which racquet to commit to, but maybe I've misread the situation and what he actually wanted was to be told to just keep doing what he's doing
You never know around here (not sure if fortunately, or unfortunately). The funniest thing is that, ultimately, someone suggests trying out a completely new frame. Gotta love TT...
 

socallefty

Professional
You post a lot about trying different strings, tensions, customization etc. on top of playing with five different racquets. You also have posted that you struggle with some of the pushers you play and you are not a string breaker. I’m guessing that you are not interested in becoming an advanced player and are more interested in experimenting with different equipment - if so, does it matter if a bunch of people on the internet make a recommendation on what you should play with. Play with whatever you feel like and keep experimenting - good foundation to become a scientist later in life.

I also see that you are a Djokovic fan - just stick with the Speed Pro as that’s his paint job. Or, you can be a hardcore fan and go buy one of his pro stocks. That’s the next step in your evolution as a tennis gearhead - buying retail is so boring when you can buy pro stockS:)
 

PD1978

Rookie
I've been through this dilemma and the best advice I can give is to keep reading talk tennis reviews and buying racquets without demoing until one day you stumbled upon your holy grail. I'm almost there.
Ha!!! You said it.
 

Winners or Errors

Hall of Fame
My challenge is always the serve at my age. I agree with those who suggest that whatever racquet helps you hold serve the best should win.
 
The 1st step in committing to a racket is to quit reading all these posts where people spout off all the virtues of the racket they chose. Of course it has virtues. It was the best for that person, not necessarily you. But as long as you keep reading how great this or that racket is, you'll have a hard time staying with a single frame.
 

pico

Semi-Pro
Tho
Pick one which you think its short comings can be easily rectified with the right string.
This is great advice. It is why I have been experimenting with strings too. It really is a marriage between good technique, racquet and strings eh!
 

Chezbeeno

Professional
Really I would just recommend committing as quickly as possible so you can start really getting used to whatever you end up with. My best racquet purchases have been ones where I picked a frame based on what I wanted specs-wise, didn't demo, just bought the racquets and committed to getting familiar with them.
 

Dragy

Hall of Fame
My challenge is always the serve at my age. I agree with those who suggest that whatever racquet helps you hold serve the best should win.
Correction: which racquet helps you hold serve into second+ hour of playing. There’s a chance RF97 isn’t cooperating no more at 4-5 in the second to secure the decider.

I suppose Speed Pro will produce best results because it’s the most forgiving of the list, still decent modern tweener.
 

Chezbeeno

Professional
Agree with the above^^^^. I feel like it makes sense to go with a racquet that is still gonna work for you when you're at your worst, in the most adverse of conditions. I used the RF97 for a while, and there was nothing like it when I was dialed in and playing aggressively, but it wasn't great when I was tired or playing defensively. I switched to the Blades eventually and I couldn't bludgeon the ball from the back of the court as effectively, but my neutral and defensive game was elevated a lot, and the overall result was hugely positive.
 

geubes

Rookie
Different take. Are you sure you play best with the specs you have gravitated towards? All of those rackets are similar in style with slight variances. Might be you are hoping for a frame to overcome a deficiency in what is a larger setup change you need to make (lower/higher weights, balance, beam thickness).

Fortunately I kinda know what works for me, so any racket in that range I can play my best tennis with. I can still play with rackets outside of that range, but the racket starts to influence my game the more it's outside my spec.

So might it be worth trying something lighter or more tweener? Something more towards the average of the spectrum?
 

kailash

Professional
Currently, in my bag I have these:
Prince Phantom 93p
Rf97
head speed pro
Head gravity pro
Technifibre tf40

I hit groundstrokes well with all. My serve is prob best with the rf97. I return best with the 93p. I really dont know how to commit to one since there are other variables too like their strings and tension. Any advice?
Which one you win with the most in matches? I would choose that, and keep the next best (feel wise) in the bag for hitting with sometimes. The rest in closet.
 

dgoran

Hall of Fame
Advice? Yes, don't pick one...just have fun trying things... unless you are making a living playing tennis IMHO is more fun to try different racquets then to stick to one...
 

Anton

Legend
Currently, in my bag I have these:
Prince Phantom 93p
Rf97
head speed pro
Head gravity pro
Technifibre tf40

I hit groundstrokes well with all. My serve is prob best with the rf97. I return best with the 93p. I really dont know how to commit to one since there are other variables too like their strings and tension. Any advice?
If you are between RF97 and 93P then you are right on Head Pro Tour 2.0 (with a touch of lead)

RF97 can be a bit of all or nothing sledge and 93P can feel just a tad small sometimes in the spin-spin-spin game. PT2.0 is a great middle ground, plus it's superb impact feel and timeless looks give it the edge over other "player" class frames.
 
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