First jog in 2yrs

movdqa

G.O.A.T.
That's excellent if you haven't been running. The key to distance is to run more slowly than you can. If you plan to run distance often, then get the right clothes, and, especially shoes.
 

Ronaldo

Talk Tennis Guru
I had no idea if I could get very far and gas out

Started out strong but last half mile was grueling . My legs just felt dead

Only did 2 miles at maybe 9 to 9 1/2 pace but I did Finish in my slow way

I plan to jog every 2 weeks
And try aqua jogging,
 

Soul

Semi-Pro
It's awful. I've become a slave to my exercise watch. To complete an exercise goal I often times find myself jogging around the house. It works but my feet are now often sore.
 

movdqa

G.O.A.T.
I don't run at all.
I ran three miles yesterday. Why did I run three miles yesterday? Because the weather was awful so I couldn't run five outside.

I've been gradually getting back into running, tennis and strength-training. I look and feel a lot better and it's nice to have the additional capacity whether it's cardiovascular, strength or endurance. It all starts with the first step and the gains can come fairly quickly - they're small but noticeable.
 

Raul_SJ

Legend
I ran three miles yesterday. Why did I run three miles yesterday? Because the weather was awful so I couldn't run five outside.

I've been gradually getting back into running, tennis and strength-training. I look and feel a lot better and it's nice to have the additional capacity whether it's cardiovascular, strength or endurance. It all starts with the first step and the gains can come fairly quickly - they're small but noticeable.
Years ago I took up jogging and I was able to jog at steady 10 minute mile pace. 3 miles distance. Did it every day for months.
Heart Rate was comfortable at the end of the jog (able to hold conversation). HR about 130 bpm at the end of jog...It did take me a couple months to work up to a comfortable HR. In the beginning the HR was 160+ bpm and very uncomfortable.

Many years later I want to come back to jogging. But now diagnosed with moderate knee osteoarthritis. Got the okay from Ortho. "There is nothing seriously wrong with X-rays. You might be able to run a marathon. Just listen to your body."... The other issue is that cardiovascular fitness declines with age.

Now I find that when I get on the treadmill at even 15 minute mile pace. my HR is at 160+ after about a 3/4 mile. If I try 10 minute mile pace, I can not even make it 1/4 mile. Asked my Cardiologist/Primary Care Doctor why cardiovascular fitness was so poor. Long story short, after echo and treadmill stress test, he said there is nothing seriously wrong with my heart. It is an aging/fitness issue. Gave me the okay to jog. No restriction on exercise.

My short term goal is to jog 1 mile at 10 minute pace... One issue is how much, if any, do stiff knees affect the heart rate? In other words, can osteo-arthritic knees cause the heart rate to spike even at slow 15 minute mile pace?
 

movdqa

G.O.A.T.
Years ago I took up jogging and I was able to jog at steady 10 minute mile pace. 3 miles distance. Did it every day for months.
Heart Rate was comfortable at the end of the jog (able to hold conversation). HR about 130 bpm at the end of jog...It did take me a couple months to work up to a comfortable HR. In the beginning the HR was 160+ bpm and very uncomfortable.

Many years later I want to come back to jogging. But now diagnosed with moderate knee osteoarthritis. Got the okay from Ortho. "There is nothing seriously wrong with X-rays. You might be able to run a marathon. Just listen to your body."... The other issue is that cardiovascular fitness declines with age.

Now I find that when I get on the treadmill at even 15 minute mile pace. my HR is at 160+ after about a 3/4 mile. If I try 10 minute mile pace, I can not even make it 1/4 mile. Asked my Cardiologist/Primary Care Doctor why cardiovascular fitness was so poor. Long story short, after echo and treadmill stress test, he said there is nothing seriously wrong with my heart. It is an aging/fitness issue. Gave me the okay to jog. No restriction on exercise.

My short term goal is to jog 1 mile at 10 minute pace... One issue is how much, if any, do stiff knees affect the heart rate? In other words, can osteo-arthritic knees cause the heart rate to spike even at slow 15 minute mile pace?
I'm recovering from cancer and was in pretty bad shape after the second course of chemo. My fitness center manager told me that I, if anyone, had an excuse not to go back to training. But training is part of who I am.

Last August, I had a fast heartrate - 220 BPM, and I couldn't get it down. I tried sitting, drinking water and then going to see the fitness center manager. She couldn't get a pulse or blood pressure reading. So she called EMTs and they took me to the hospital. I would have died without treatment. They were able to get my heartrate back to normal but gave me a heart medication. I spoke to a cardiologist and we determined that it was due to dehydration. I can't tell when I'm thirsty - side-effect of the cancer treatment. So I checked my heartrate manually ten times a day and got annoyed and bought a watch with a heartrate monitor. When I run on the treadmill, I have my phone on the display and it shows me my heartrate so I can modify training effort with the heartrate and so I can stay out of trouble.

I can set alarms on the watch as well. The watch software gives me a lot of data on training including heartrate graphs, speed, elevation, temperature and pace.

On knee issues: get good shoes, track the miles on them and change them every 300-400 miles. I recommend core workouts to decrease the stress on the knees. As always, the lighter you are, the less pounding your knees take.
 
I’ve had issues with knee tendinitis whenever I attempt to take up jogging/running, forcing me to resort to uphill treadmill work for cardio.
 

Raul_SJ

Legend
I'm recovering from cancer and was in pretty bad shape after the second course of chemo. My fitness center manager told me that I, if anyone, had an excuse not to go back to training. But training is part of who I am.

Last August, I had a fast heartrate - 220 BPM, and I couldn't get it down. I tried sitting, drinking water and then going to see the fitness center manager. She couldn't get a pulse or blood pressure reading. So she called EMTs and they took me to the hospital. I would have died without treatment. They were able to get my heartrate back to normal but gave me a heart medication. I spoke to a cardiologist and we determined that it was due to dehydration. I can't tell when I'm thirsty - side-effect of the cancer treatment. So I checked my heartrate manually ten times a day and got annoyed and bought a watch with a heartrate monitor. When I run on the treadmill, I have my phone on the display and it shows me my heartrate so I can modify training effort with the heartrate and so I can stay out of trouble.

I can set alarms on the watch as well. The watch software gives me a lot of data on training including heartrate graphs, speed, elevation, temperature and pace.

On knee issues: get good shoes, track the miles on them and change them every 300-400 miles. I recommend core workouts to decrease the stress on the knees. As always, the lighter you are, the less pounding your knees take.
Yes, it makes sense that medication side effects can cause high HR... My resting HR is normal at 68 and not on any medications of note and hydrated.
If it is the case that aging is the cause of poor cardiio vascular fitness, I suppose I just need to keep exercising and hope that cardiovascular fitness eventually improves. Just as it did when I was younger.

I thought maybe the stiff knees can cause the unusually high HR during jogging, but that does not sound likely... I also try to jog uphill, which places less stress on the knees.
 
Resting heart rate gets lower if you train. It also gets lower when you age.

In other words, heart rate alone is not enough to tell your fitness.
 

movdqa

G.O.A.T.
My resting heartrate was in the 70s. It's now in the 60s with the occasional trip to the 50s. Goal is to get it into the 50s all the time.

The elliptical may be a good alternative if you have knee problems.
 
One issue is how much, if any, do stiff knees affect the heart rate? In other words, can osteo-arthritic knees cause the heart rate to spike even at slow 15 minute mile pace?
I can see an indirect effect: if you are not running with an efficient gait in order to avoid stressing your knees, you'll probably be stressing some other part of your body that isn't optimized for that task. Hence you will be working harder [as well as possibly injuring something else].

How about instead of targeting a time, target a distance with a comfortable pace?
 

Raul_SJ

Legend
Resting heart rate gets lower if you train. It also gets lower when you age.

In other words, heart rate alone is not enough to tell your fitness.
Had never heard that resting HR lowers with age. Thought it was just the opposite...
My Doctor did tell me that cardiovascular fitness declines with age, which I took to mean that resting HR increases with age.
:unsure:

https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/resting-heart-rate-can-reflect-current-future-health-201606179806

Many factors influence your resting heart rate. Genes play a role. Aging tends to speed it up.
 
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Harry_Wild

G.O.A.T.
I only run on indoor treadmills now! It much safer for me then outside where are ruts, uneven pavement and loose gravel, wind, etc... to contend with. I try for time first follow by pace then distance.
 

movdqa

G.O.A.T.
I only run on indoor treadmills now! It much safer for me then outside where are ruts, uneven pavement and loose gravel, wind, etc... to contend with. I try for time first follow by pace then distance.
I agree that the treadmill is safer but it’s just so boring. It is nice if you want to do interval work.
 

Ronaldo

Talk Tennis Guru
I only run on indoor treadmills now! It much safer for me then outside where are ruts, uneven pavement and loose gravel, wind, etc... to contend with. I try for time first follow by pace then distance.
Stepping on exposed tree roots while running trails
 
I only run on indoor treadmills now! It much safer for me then outside where are ruts, uneven pavement and loose gravel, wind, etc... to contend with. I try for time first follow by pace then distance.
However, the upside to those obstacles is that they improve your balance, making you more likely to avoid falls which cripple so many.
 

movdqa

G.O.A.T.
I've never fallen on a treadmill but I have tripped but regained my balance. I run on treadmills at up to 9.5 MPH which is somewhat dangerous because it's hard to push the buttons at that speed. Don't run when your tired and don't do stupid things on a treadmill or on the trail. I've also seen my fair share of phones drop on the treadmill bed and go shooting out the back.
 

dgold44

G.O.A.T.
Just the fact that you can do 2 miles is great; keep it up and the time will drop by itself without you worrying about it. Just don't overdo it and injure yourself trying to reduce your time.
I have been doing much dangerous grappling and I hope I don’t get injured
Last class we did heel hooks which is the most dangerous submission there is
 
Not much information here. Not young.

Recovering - I missed tennis for a year and a half when I tore my rotator cuff and had surgery. I also had right knee arthritis to consider but that is not too bad now after my last year of tennis since the recovery.

When recovering from the shoulder surgery, jogging would not be my choice. Wanting low impact, I used a stationary bike with a brake on the wheel (old Schwinn). I would pedal for 12 minutes increasing the brake a quarter turn every few minutes. At around 12 minutes, I would increase the brake to a level that would raise my heart rate to 130 beats per minute and did that for another 3 minutes. The control from the brake looked as if I could control my heart rate for other cardio routines. I wanted to get my heart rate up during the months that I was sitting around recovering from the shoulder surgery. The recovery plan called for 6 months of progressive shoulder stretching, then 3 months of light strength exercises, then slowly getting back to tennis. But unfortunately, when I could have become more active, I got my first kidney stone and it took 2 months of issues to resolve that. Total time away from tennis wound up 1 1/2 years.

The above was not a good exercise plan. But the bike was low impact for my knee and with a blood oxygen monitor/pulse monitor the bike brake was good for controlling my heart rate.
 
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movdqa

G.O.A.T.
Just did another 2 miles

Will try 3 next time

My time is slow like 9 min a mile lol
Very slow
Slow down to 10 minutes a mile - it should be pretty easy. Then gradually speed up. It's easy to increase distance by decreasing speed. But I think that playing tennis encourages you to run faster, not farther.
 

LeeD

Bionic Poster
Swim?
Not well. Maybe 2 laps in a big pool, then I'm pooped.
I did have to swim in on a closeout day at Sunset Beach, told my board went out the channel, and swam out past Kammies and past Rocky Point to retrieve my cherished 8'6" x 20" semi gun. I was pooped upon making it in at almost Ehukai Beach Park, almost 2 miles SW.
 

movdqa

G.O.A.T.
One benefit to running on a track or treadmill is that you can focus on performance instead of worrying about your surroundings. You can work on doing intervals which is probably a better way to improve your overall performance over time. You need to do distance as well but I think that alternating intervals and speed work will get you there faster.
 
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