First round of string trials

theSHAMOO

New User
Been playing tennis for 13 years, competed at state level in high school, took many years off in college. I am now looking into playing in several local/USTA leagues. Never gave a second thought to strings other than what my coach recommended until I started reading these forums. I was probably better off that way :unsure:

Anyways, I am buying a dropweight stringer and will be looking for a 'go-to' string, or maybe just going down the rabbit hole of endless strings. I like to play aggressive groundstrokes and rush the net whenever possible so I want to find a polyester string that also provides some touch/feel. Comfort is also a factor, several strings I have tried will leave me with days of elbow pain on mishits (S7T).

If any is interested in hearing feedback from my experience with these strings, let me know and I will be glad to update this thread as I go along, though I don't expect to move very quickly.

String family photo below:
 

eah123

Semi-Pro
First, welcome to the TTW. Second, congrats on deciding to buy a stringer and learning how to string. It will give you more control of the process and allow you to restring more frequently, whenever you need to, instead of depending on the availability of a professional stringer. Third, it looks like you are interested in only polys. I think that's perfectly fine, since you are probably young and have a healthy arm. Fourth, I recommend highly that you stick with 1 brand and string type until you really get a good feel for how it plays. Don't move to another string until you are sure that you "need" something else. This will allow you to focus on your tennis play rather than your equipment, which should be the ultimate goal.

Something like Isospeed Baseline 16 or Solinco Hyper G 16L would be a perfect place to start. Buy a reel, string it up at 50 pounds, move up +/- 5 pounds the next time to see how it goes. If you decide later that you don't like the string, it will be easy to sell the partial reel, especially if you track approximately how much string you have used from the reel, without taking much of a loss.
 

beltsman

Legend
Been playing tennis for 13 years, competed at state level in high school, took many years off in college. I am now looking into playing in several local/USTA leagues. Never gave a second thought to strings other than what my coach recommended until I started reading these forums. I was probably better off that way :unsure:

Anyways, I am buying a dropweight stringer and will be looking for a 'go-to' string, or maybe just going down the rabbit hole of endless strings. I like to play aggressive groundstrokes and rush the net whenever possible so I want to find a polyester string that also provides some touch/feel. Comfort is also a factor, several strings I have tried will leave me with days of elbow pain on mishits (S7T).

If any is interested in hearing feedback from my experience with these strings, let me know and I will be glad to update this thread as I go along, though I don't expect to move very quickly.

String family photo below:
Following
 

SteveI

Legend
Welcome.. to Talk Tennis. Your life will never be the same again. Once you open Pandora's box there is no looking back. Try to stay away from the going down the rabbit hole of the 1,000s of string combinations. Tourna Big Hitter Silver 7 can be firm to play with but holds tennis great. Don't overlook Natty Gut / Poly... Enjoy the ride and stringing your own sticks.
 
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theSHAMOO

New User
Hey guys, going to do my first string job in the next couple of days. Any of these strings significantly easier than others for a first string job?
 

fuzz nation

G.O.A.T.
Hey guys, going to do my first string job in the next couple of days. Any of these strings significantly easier than others for a first string job?
Agree with the syn. gut recommendation for getting familiar with the stringing process. I've pretty much adopted the rule of thumb from the guy who helped me get started out with stringing my own. His take on this was that after a half dozen string jobs, we generally turn the corner and get more used to the in's and out's of it. The first go 'round might take 2.5 hours, but after a half dozen stringings you'll probably be down to about 45 mins or less.

Syn. gut is easy to work with because it has a little backbone compared with many multi's. Not too tricky to sneak syn. gut through a partially blocked grommet - a little chap stick on the end of the string you're threading can work wonders there.

Mis-hits or not, arm/wrist pain is a serious issue and even young, healthy sluggers are NOT immune to injury. Poly strings with make any racquet rougher on the arm. If you're getting these unfortunate "signals" in the wake of playing with some of these polys, I'd say try a couple different layouts of syn. gut to see how it performs for you. I use it in my own frames all the time and after stringing for many locals of all levels for over 15 years now, I still think that syn. gut can be an ideal option for a lot of us.

Stringing at home makes it really easy to keep relatively fresh beds of syn. gut in your racquets, but if you're going to keep dipping your toe in the pond of poly, I'd say stick with lighter gauges to get some of that poly performance without risking the punishment that can come with heavier versions of those strings.

Although I'm generally a little bit leery of setting anybody up with some poly so that they can try it, the one layout I've had great success with is a hybrid of Isospeed Baseline 1.20mm mains and a 16 ga. syn. gut cross. This combo has been trouble-free for all of the stronger kids and adults on my list of "clients" who have used it through recent years.
 

theSHAMOO

New User
Agree with the syn. gut recommendation for getting familiar with the stringing process. I've pretty much adopted the rule of thumb from the guy who helped me get started out with stringing my own. His take on this was that after a half dozen string jobs, we generally turn the corner and get more used to the in's and out's of it. The first go 'round might take 2.5 hours, but after a half dozen stringings you'll probably be down to about 45 mins or less.

Syn. gut is easy to work with because it has a little backbone compared with many multi's. Not too tricky to sneak syn. gut through a partially blocked grommet - a little chap stick on the end of the string you're threading can work wonders there.

Mis-hits or not, arm/wrist pain is a serious issue and even young, healthy sluggers are NOT immune to injury. Poly strings with make any racquet rougher on the arm. If you're getting these unfortunate "signals" in the wake of playing with some of these polys, I'd say try a couple different layouts of syn. gut to see how it performs for you. I use it in my own frames all the time and after stringing for many locals of all levels for over 15 years now, I still think that syn. gut can be an ideal option for a lot of us.

Stringing at home makes it really easy to keep relatively fresh beds of syn. gut in your racquets, but if you're going to keep dipping your toe in the pond of poly, I'd say stick with lighter gauges to get some of that poly performance without risking the punishment that can come with heavier versions of those strings.

Although I'm generally a little bit leery of setting anybody up with some poly so that they can try it, the one layout I've had great success with is a hybrid of Isospeed Baseline 1.20mm mains and a 16 ga. syn. gut cross. This combo has been trouble-free for all of the stronger kids and adults on my list of "clients" who have used it through recent years.
The suggestions to use syngut are great... in hindsight :-D

I strung my first racquet up last night and it must have taken ballpark 3 hours. Most of the extra time was due to unleashing a set of poly into a rats nest, running short on the mains due to lazy measurements (had to start over), and accidentally dropping the weight by removing the wrong clamp (had to start over again). Regardless, I got through it and learned a ton. I'm sure next job will be half the time. I should be able to post my thoughts on Solinco Outlast in the coming days! Hopefully the playability is not too adversely affected from the amateur string job.
 

SteveI

Legend
Agree with the syn. gut recommendation for getting familiar with the stringing process. I've pretty much adopted the rule of thumb from the guy who helped me get started out with stringing my own. His take on this was that after a half dozen string jobs, we generally turn the corner and get more used to the in's and out's of it. The first go 'round might take 2.5 hours, but after a half dozen stringings you'll probably be down to about 45 mins or less.

Syn. gut is easy to work with because it has a little backbone compared with many multi's. Not too tricky to sneak syn. gut through a partially blocked grommet - a little chap stick on the end of the string you're threading can work wonders there.

Mis-hits or not, arm/wrist pain is a serious issue and even young, healthy sluggers are NOT immune to injury. Poly strings with make any racquet rougher on the arm. If you're getting these unfortunate "signals" in the wake of playing with some of these polys, I'd say try a couple different layouts of syn. gut to see how it performs for you. I use it in my own frames all the time and after stringing for many locals of all levels for over 15 years now, I still think that syn. gut can be an ideal option for a lot of us.

Stringing at home makes it really easy to keep relatively fresh beds of syn. gut in your racquets, but if you're going to keep dipping your toe in the pond of poly, I'd say stick with lighter gauges to get some of that poly performance without risking the punishment that can come with heavier versions of those strings.

Although I'm generally a little bit leery of setting anybody up with some poly so that they can try it, the one layout I've had great success with is a hybrid of Isospeed Baseline 1.20mm mains and a 16 ga. syn. gut cross. This combo has been trouble-free for all of the stronger kids and adults on my list of "clients" who have used it through recent years.

I use this setup... all the time. Isospeed Baseline.. etc and syn gut. Either way. Depending on player. Syn. Gut in mains. Cheap Champions Choice. Poly in mains.. nice set-up and safe for entry level poly user.. and super cheap. I used it my own frames at times also.
 

socallefty

Legend
Some advice on using polys in terms of tensions and playing time.

If you play with poly longer than 15 hours, that’s what is causing your injury - not your racquet. Poly goes dead fast and I bet that when you play with fresh strings, your discomfort is negligible.

I am in my mid-fifties playing every day usually about 4 singles matches, 2 doubles, 1 hitting drill session and 1 lesson per week for about 15 hours (900 mins) against 4.5s and low 5.0s. There’s no particular problem or toll on my body because I change my poly strings and shoes frequently to safeguard against injuries. If I play with a stiff poly like ALU Power for even 8 hours, my wrist will hurt and I will cut it out immediately - soft poly lasts about 12-15 hours of singles and a bit longer if it is a mix of singles/doubles.

It is rare to hear of elbow/wrist injuries if players use poly for less than 15 hours and string below 50 lbs (poly plays great in the forties) irrespective of the racquet. People play with poly too long, get injured and then blame whatever racquet they play with. Of course, a stiffer racquet will transmit more impact shock and you have to be diligent about cutting out poly even quicker or stringing lower if you use one.
 

Mircat

New User
Used Hyper-G and Lynx Tour from the ones you mentioned. I used Lynx Tour for the first time last night and absolutely love it. Great price too. It may be a keeper.
 

AceyMan

Semi-Pro
Try the Lynx Tour with a 15L syngut in the crosses.

It's the mass of the stringbed as much as how good it pockets. It 'whomps' really well, for me, at least.

If you don't tear up crosses with spin you may really be surprised how good this plays in the right frame.
 

fuzz nation

G.O.A.T.
The suggestions to use syngut are great... in hindsight :-D

I strung my first racquet up last night and it must have taken ballpark 3 hours. Most of the extra time was due to unleashing a set of poly into a rats nest, running short on the mains due to lazy measurements (had to start over), and accidentally dropping the weight by removing the wrong clamp (had to start over again). Regardless, I got through it and learned a ton. I'm sure next job will be half the time. I should be able to post my thoughts on Solinco Outlast in the coming days! Hopefully the playability is not too adversely affected from the amateur string job.
Nice - you've broken the seal and there's no looking back!! After the first half dozen adventures, you'll see a lot fewer snafu's like what you ran into with this first one. Consistency will set in and you'll be cooking up string beds just the way you want them to turn out.
 

theSHAMOO

New User
A few updates and a few questions.

I hit with Solinco Outlast the past two nights. I didn't play particularly well, and also found the strings to cosistently let off a high frequency pinging sound on impact (I use a dampener). I am curious if anyone who uses outlast can testify that this is a normal quality of the string, or if it a quality due to being my first string job?

Also, I started stringing my backup racquet last night and after tensioning 6 mains on each side, something came up that was going to prohibit me from finishing the string job. I undid my work and took the strings out of the racquet. Will there be any poor playing qualities to the strings now that I will be retensioning them in my racquet? I have a match this weekend so I'm really hoping I can be confident in one of these 2 string jobs :-D
 

LOBALOT

Hall of Fame
A few updates and a few questions.

I hit with Solinco Outlast the past two nights. I didn't play particularly well, and also found the strings to cosistently let off a high frequency pinging sound on impact (I use a dampener). I am curious if anyone who uses outlast can testify that this is a normal quality of the string, or if it a quality due to being my first string job?

Also, I started stringing my backup racquet last night and after tensioning 6 mains on each side, something came up that was going to prohibit me from finishing the string job. I undid my work and took the strings out of the racquet. Will there be any poor playing qualities to the strings now that I will be retensioning them in my racquet? I have a match this weekend so I'm really hoping I can be confident in one of these 2 string jobs :-D
Yes, it will not perform the same as it is kind of like pre-stretching the strings. Again, I would probably practice first to avoid this type of thing so that if you mess up stringing a $3 set of synthetic gut you can just undo it and redo it again as practice vs. having to redo something you actually hope to use.

When I started I actually grabbed an old racquet that I did not plan to use and restrung it and restrung it and restrung it etc. until I felt I had stringing somewhat down and then moved to stringing racquets I actually cared about with string I actually needed to perform.
 

theSHAMOO

New User
Played a match with Head Lynx Tour 16. I actually felt very confident in my string job. I strung the racquet (PS97) @ 52#. The first thing I noticed was the weight. I've read peoples discussion on weight of Lynx Tour on the forums, but I didn't think that I would be that sensitive to that sort of detail... boy was I wrong. This string is heavy. Other than weight, the string performed incredible. It felt very control oriented, good spin and low power. In 16 gauge, I do not consider this string to be a long term option. Througout the length of the match the extra weight seemed to be the cause of some arm fatigue. No distinct elbow issues, just overall discomfort and fatigue as the match neared 2.5hrs. Arm fatigue resulted in a decline in my serving. I may have more updates on this string as I will probably continue to play with it for the next couple weeks.
 

theSHAMOO

New User
This week I've demo'd a Vcore 95 and the racquet shop gave me permission to string it up with my own strings. I put on SPPP and have been able to hit with it a few times, as well as having one match. Not sure whether the credit should go to the VC95 or the strings, but I had much more fun playing with these strings than the lynx tour 1.30. The lynx tour just became very heavy and stiff as matches/sessions drew on over 2 hours. With the VC/sppp, I swung as big as I wanted on serves during every session, even for a 3 set match, and had no arm discomfort. This is more important to me than any other playability aspect.

On another note, I bought a couple sets up Topspin cyber flash 17, OGSM 17, and Forten Sweet 16. I am pretty interested in trying a few poly/syngut hybrids.

I am confused on what to expect when adding syngut as a cross to a poly. With multis as a cross, I have heard that the stringbed softens up and gets some extra power. Does syngut add similar characteristics to the stringbed?
 

ryushen21

Legend
@theSHAMOO you are officially down the rabbit hole bud. It never ends.

As far as what others have said, continue practicing with syn gut and make sure to practice your knots. Everyone has their preference but I'd advise picking one and sticking to it.

You had some pretty good strings up there in your pic. Lynx Tour is excellent in a full bed but I just strung it up with Element crosses and it seems even better. Don't overlook the poly/poly hybrids.
 
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